Current Weather Conditions

 
Seven Day Forecast for Emporia, Virginia
 

Community Calendar Sponsored By...

 

Southside Virginia Community College wants you!!  There is still time to register for classes and  apply for Financial Aid for the upcoming semester starting August 20.  Come by to see us...  Go to SVCC's Christanna Campus in Alberta or the John H. Daniel Campus in Keysville or a location  in Emporia, Blackstone, Chase City, South Boston,  or South HIll for individual help or visit SVCC online at Southside.edu.  Now is the time, SVCC is the place!!!!!

Lewis D. Allen

Lewis D. Allen, 87, of Emporia, passed away Sunday, August 19, 2018. He was preceded in death by his wife, Barbara Vincent Allen; his son, Larry Allen; daughter, Wanda Lankford and brother, Benton Allen.

Mr. Allen is survived by four sons, J. W. Allen and wife, Patricia, Randy Allen, Stanley Allen and wife, Cindy, and Barry Allen; seven grandchildren, Ashley Burns and husband, Adam, Jessica Hevener and husband, Michael, Kathleen Crowder and husband, Dwayne, Ryan Allen, Brianna Allen, David Allen and Lee Hunter; five great-grandchildren and a half-brother, James Allen and wife, Pam.

The family will receive friends 6-8 p.m. Friday, August 24 at Owen Funeral Home, 303 S. Halifax Rd, Jarratt, Virginia. The funeral service will be held 11 a.m. Saturday, August 25 at Calvary Baptist Church. Interment will follow at Greensville Memorial Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers, the family suggests memorial contributions be made to Calvary Baptist Church, 310 N. Main St., Emporia, Virginia 23847.

Online condolences may be shared with the family at www.owenfh.com.

Spotlight on Jobs by the Virginia Employment Commission

Meat Cutter: Locally owned business seeking a professionally minded individual who is will to grow in a family oriented business as a butcher/meat cutter.  Prospective employee must meet the following qualifications:  Be able to lift at least 40 pounds and cut, trim, and prepare consumer-sized portions of meat per customers request.  Employer will train but prefers 12 months experience working in a similar environment.  Applicants must be registered with the Virginia Employment Commission and be pre screened before meeting with the employer.  Job Order# 1405036

Shift Supervisor: The Shift Supervisor is responsible for leading a wood products production team to work injury-free/incident free in a continuous manufacturing environment consistent with management philosophy and framework. Job Order# 1408377

CDL-A Regional Truck Driving: Averitt Express is currently offering professional CDL-A truck driver jobs in our regional driver division. Drive primarily Southern, Southwest, and Midwest lanes with occasional runs to the Northeast. Regional CDL-A truck driver jobs feature weekly home time, 100% no-touch freight, Pre Pass Plus, and a spouse rider program. JO# 1406813

MILLWRIGHT-CLASS II: Troubleshoot, install, align, dismantle, repair and maintain industrial machinery and mechanical equipment for improved reliability and up-time. Help meet or exceed production efficiency and quality goals through a quality maintenance program. JO# 1405195

Customer Service Representative: Answers incoming customer calls regarding billing issues, product problems, service questions and general client concerns.  Responsible for maintaining a high level of professionalism with clients and working to establish a positive rapport with every caller. Update customer information in the customer service database during and after each call.  Work with the management team to stay updated on product knowledge and be informed of any changes in company policies.  JO# 1398983

THESE AND ALL JOBS WITH THE VIRGINIA EMPLOYMENT COMMISSION CAN BE FOUND ONLINE AT

www.vawc.virginia.gov

VCU Health CMH Team Member of the Month July 2018

(Left to Right) W. Scott Burnette, CEO, VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital presented Bertha Evans, Environmental Services Supervisor, the VCU Health CMH STAR Service Team Member of the Month Award for July.  There to congratulate Bertha was Todd Howell, Vice President of Professional Services.

Bertha has been employed at VCU Health CMH for 17 years.  Her dedication and work ethic are just two of the qualities that make her a wonderful asset to VCU Health CMH.  The nomination form submitted on her behalf stated, “Bertha consistently exceeds expectations.  She is a wonderful example of whom a supervisor should be in that she never asks of her team anything she wouldn’t do herself.  She always has a warm and approachable manner.  Bertha recently went above and beyond to find a patients phone that had been lost in a linen pile.  Bertha along with her team member Linda Wilkins took on the challenge and found the phone while having a positive attitude. There isn’t a time that she has not stepped up to resolve an issue, especially for patients.”

In addition to the award certificate, Bertha received a STAR Service lapel pin, letter of commendation from Administration, a $40 gift certificate, and a parking place of her choice for the month.

Bertha resides in South Hill, VA.

Isaiah Stephens Competes in Hershey National Junior Olympic Championships

Lazers’ Track member, Isaiah Stephens competed in the 2018 USA Track & Field Hershey National Jr. Olympics Championship at North Carolina AT& T State University in Greensboro, NC. Stephens competed in the javelin and discus field events for 13-14 boys age group.  He is ranked #20 in the discus and ranked #28 in the javelin in the USA.

Isaiah and his mother, La-Tina Smith would like to thank everyone for their support.  They give special thanks and blessings to his Coach Les Young.

In Virginia town, African-American elders hold mixed views on confederate statue

The Confederate statue in Leesburg, Virginia, does not represent a certain Confederate figure, but rather a generic Confederate soldier. (Capital News Service photo).

By ALEXANDRIA CAROLAN, Capital News Service

LEESBURG, Virginia -- Gertrude Evans, 70, was born into the Jim Crow South and lived through the rocky integration of Leesburg when firemen filled a swimming pool with cement and garbage rather than permit its integration.

More than a half-century later, she turned to art as therapy to work through that traumatic period when she wasn’t allowed to sit on the red stools at Little John’s drugstore or watch a movie at the neighborhood Tally Ho theater.

The white nationalist rally in Charlottesville last year brought “everything to the surface,” she told Capital News Service recently. “…  I mean you see (racism), you see it.”

For the first time, she said, she’s been thinking too about the Confederate statue in front of the Leesburg courthouse. She doesn’t believe it should be moved but, still, “it’s the first thing you see” downtown.

“It causes conversation — good.” But “take it down and put it in Ball’s Bluff (Battlefield), you’ll never see it again,” she said. History will be forgotten.

Leesburg’s statue, like so many others around the country, became the subject of renewed concern following the 2015 murder of nine black church members by a white supremacist who posed on social media with a Confederate flag. One member of the Loudoun County Board of Supervisors has recommended the statue be moved to Ball’s Bluff Battlefield two and a half miles away where the Confederacy defeated the Union.

Virginia law prevents the county from moving or relocating the monument. In September 2017, the Loudoun County Board of Supervisors decided not to ask the state for authority to move the statue, but it asked the county’s heritage commission to make recommendations this summer regarding the statue and its surroundings.

Capital News Service recently interviewed community members in Leesburg as part of a series exploring the views of African-American and white residents in five southern cities where Confederate statues stand on public land in front of courthouses.

Teams of reporters traveled to Anderson, South Carolina; Easton, Maryland; Elizabeth City, North Carolina; Franklin, Tennessee; and Leesburg, Virginia. They also interviewed leaders of the Maryland Division of the Sons of Confederate Veterans.

Most residents, black and white, were wary of taking dramatic steps, such as removing the statues, that would inflame tensions within their communities and could make it more difficult for future generations to understand the Civil War and segregationist Jim Crow eras. Most residents also said they preferred adding more context to Civil War memorials than removing them all together.

Derek Summers Jr., 36, and the founder of Loudoun County’s Citizens’ Committee against Domestic Violence, said he feels the Confederate statue’s gun pointing at him when he drives or walks past it on North King Street nearly every day.

“It’s like letting you know that in the hearts and mind of some of these folk here, the fight’s not over,” said Summers, seated on a bench next to the statue.

David Dixon, 59, owner of Jackson’s Barber Shop a few blocks down the road, has passed the statue on his commute to Leesburg for 24 years. He said the monument doesn’t bother him.

“My personality and the way I am, I really don’t care,” he said. “ … I look more toward the future than the past.”

Marquez Mitchell has passed the Leesburg statue when he visits Jackson’s for a haircut every few weeks. Confederate monuments “represent hatred and slavery, even though on paper they said we were free,” the Harpers Ferry resident said.

As a child, 41-year-old Chris Johnson would go to concerts near the courtyard of the statue. Johnson, a lifelong Leesburg resident, said the statue doesn’t bother him, but “what it stands for” does.

“They don’t need to destroy it necessarily, because there are people who find value in it. But I think for the greater good it is something that should be moved,” Johnson said.

Jim Roberts who leads a walking tour to commemorate African-American history here, leaves the statue off his itinerary. As a child, Roberts played near the statue and never paid much attention to it. He believes the newcomers are offended by it, not so much the old-timers.

“I can’t waste time thinking about what happened 150 years ago because it’s over and done with,” he said.

Horace Nelson Lassiter, 84, a barber at Robinson’s Barber shop which opened in 1962 said the statue “doesn’t bother me. I don’t care what is already done,” he said.

Lassiter was one of the first black police officers in the Loudoun County Deputy Sheriff’s Department in the 1960’s, and took the position “to show black people that they could get a job.”

“There’s still racism (in Leesburg). It hasn’t changed ... It’s not the younger people, it’s the older people in my age group,” Lassiter said.

Lassiter’s wife, Mary Louise Lassiter, 81, a prominent activist in Loudoun County and former local NAACP chapter president wants the statue to stay and for visitors to understand the pain slaves went through on courthouse grounds.

“When they’re told, hopefully they’ll understand the torture of all of those people who were put in those stocks.”

Formerly A Slave Market, Now a Favorite Lunch Spot

The square where the statue sits operated as a slave market throughout of the Civil War. Today the statue is surrounded by restaurants, coffee shops, a bar and the original courthouse. Government employees often lunch feet away from where whipping posts, cages and auction blocks once stood.

While the slave auctions in Leesburg were much smaller than those in other Virginia towns, the courthouse was the epicenter of the city’s slavery institution. In 1856, the court ordered that whippings move off courthouse property, according to newspaper advertisements at the time.

Three lynchings of black men accused of crimes also took place in Leesburg, in 1880, 1889 and 1902, according to the “Lynching in Virginia” history project at George Mason University.

Six years later, in 1908, the United Daughters of the Confederacy’s Leesburg chapter paid to have the statue erected to commemorate soldiers who had died in the war. Like most

Confederate statues across the South, the Leesburg statue’s unveiling came during “a terrible period of disenfranchisement — the Jim Crow period where enforced segregation and disenfranchisement really started to bleed,” said Jim Hall, author of the “Last Lynching in Northern Virginia.”

The president of the Leesburg chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy declined to comment, but the national organization has said it does not support racism, white supremacy or the white nationalists who rallied in Charlottesville, and that it opposes their use of Confederate symbols.  Many of its members say the Civil War was not about preserving slavery, a view historians dispute.

“The statues that celebrate the Confederacy were put up when African-Americans were demanding to be treated like human beings,” Loudoun County Board of Supervisors Chair said Phyllis Randall, the only member of the board to vote in favor of asking the state for authority over the statue.

Known as "Loudoun's silent sentinel," the bronze figure built by famed sculptor Frederick William Sievers is a soldier with his gun cocked and his eyes fixed forward. It stands higher than both the Korean War monument to the right of the courthouse entrance and the Revolutionary War monument to the left.

In 2005, the local United Daughters of the Confederacy chapter organized the cleaning and rededication of the statue.

It was cleaned with ground up walnut shells to help dissolve the mint green oxidation covering it.

Statue Oversees Businesses District

The generic soldier has an unobstructed view of the Downtown Saloon, a biker bar established in the 1960’s and decorated in bras and Confederate symbols. The menus have images of the courthouse and statue on them. The bar sells T-shirts with art of the statue. Sometimes, motorcycle riding members of the Mechanized Cavalry of the Sons of Confederate Veterans visit and park outside.

A sticker on the mirror behind the bar says “Dixie Rider,” overlayed on top of a Confederate flag.

Scott Warner, in a black T-shirt with a Confederate flag on the left pocket, said of the statue: “Any soldier who dies for what he believes in needs to be honored.” The statue’s fate has “become a political issue and it shouldn’t be,” he said. “It’s our history.”

Not many people paid attention to the statue “until Charlottesville,” said 46-year-old Jim Boyce, seated in the restaurant. “You can’t get rid of everything,” he said. “If you get rid of everything, the history isn’t here.”

Margaret Brown, a member of the Black History Committee at the local Thomas Balch Library, protested against the statue last summer after the march in Charlottesville. She said the biker bar was an intimidating presence for protestors.

“There were some guys who were across the bar who were pretty aggressive with their motorcycles,” revving the engines and glaring at the protestors, she said.

Phillip Thompson, president of the Loudoun County NAACP, said the statue shouldn’t be located in a place for justice. “The courthouse is a seat of power and people were trying to send a message to black citizens,” he said.

Pastor Michelle Thomas, a member of the nine-person commission assessing the future of the statue, said the statue “has the microphone —  of hate and oppression and fear.”

Evans, though, has mixed feelings. The statue controversy has made her want to know more about the Civil War era.

“I know my ancestors were enslaved. But I don’t know how they were treated,” she said. “It just makes me think and wonder … I’m very interested in that whole era.”

CNS staff writers Ariel Guillory and Elisee Browchuk contributed to this report.

Raleigh R. Jones, Sr.

Raleigh R. Jones, Sr., 84, of Emporia, passed away Saturday, August 18, 2018. He was preceded in death by his wife, Katherine T. Jones and all five of his brothers. He was also preceded in death by his longtime devoted companion, Joyce Whitehead just earlier this year.

Mr. Jones is survived by two sons and their families, Raleigh Jones, Jr. and wife, Lillian and Patrick Jones and wife, Kathy; six grandchildren, twelve great-grandchildren; two great-great-grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews.

The family will receive friends 6-8 p.m. Monday, August 20 at Owen Funeral Home, 303 S. Halifax Rd., Jarratt, Virginia. The funeral service with full military honors will be held 11 a.m. Tuesday, August 21 at Emporia Cemetery. Online condolences may be shared with the family at www.owenfh.com.

Clarice Elizabeth (Betty) Padgett

Clarice Elizabeth (Betty) Padgett, 81, of Jarratt,  died Wednesday, August 15, 2018. She was the widow of the late Preston Arnold Padgett. She was also preceded in death by her parents, Calvin and Alma Gregory, a granddaughter, Blair Alexis Padgett, and a niece, Angie Gregory. She is survived by three daughters, Karen Padgett of Emporia,VA; Pat Padgett of Ridgeway,VA;and Shirley Slagle  and fiancé Gerald Lee and son Blake of emporia,VA; one son Michael Padgett and wife Sherry of Jarratt,VA; five grandchildren, John Banty and wife Brandy of Windsor, VA, Megan Davis and husband G.W. of Emporia Hunter Padgett of Chesapeake,VA, Brianna Padgett of Jarratt,VA, and Patton Carroll and wife Michelle of South Port N.C. and one great-grandson Jase Banty. The family will receive friends Friday August 17, 2018 at Owen Funeral Home in Jarratt,VA from 6:00 P.M.until 8:30 P.M.  where the funeral service will be held Saturday, August 18, 2108 at 11:00 A.M. with interment to follow at High Hills Memorial Cemetery.

"Just Wait"

Yes wait is known by Everyone
no matter what the age
it's not a profound movement
but really just a stage.
 
We all wait to see the doctor
and for our favorite T. V. show
It does rarely mean forever
yet for now we cannot go.
 
The world becomes a standstill
as we while away the time
to anticipate how things will be
is like watching a mime.
 
To wait puts everything on hold
all thoughts and hopes or dreams
yet some waiting helps improve
but that's just how it seems.
 
Waiting's played a stellar part
in our life throuought the years
sometimes it brought joy and excitement
thought other times brought tears.
 
Yes hurry up and wait ole friend
there is nothing else to do
just remember if I must wait in line
it's only right you do!
 
         Roy E. Schepp

Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center Announces Employee of the Quarter

Emporia, VA – Vickie Michael has been named the Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center (SVRMC) Employee of the Quarter. Ms. Michael, who works in SVRMC’s Laboratory, has been employed at SVRMC since May 1978.

Each quarter employees are nominated for demonstrating excellence in any or all of ten Standards of Behavior.  Ms. Michael’s nomination included the following statement:  “Vickie’s commitment to her co-workers and sense of ownership is demonstrated by her quality of work.  She has been instrumental to the Lab’s success with many Joint Commission surveys. Although her co-workers in the Lab know the importance of her role, many of SVRMC’s other staff members do not realize the hard work, long hours, and effort it takes to prepare for Lab Joint Commission surveys.  Vickie, along with her co-workers, is a vital part of ensuring that success.  We would like to take this opportunity to thank Vickie for everything she does all year to ensure SVRMC’s Laboratory Services meet those regulations for the safety of our patients.”

As SVRMC’s Employee of the Quarter, Ms. Michael received a certificate of recognition, balloons, cookies to share with her co-workers, a cash award, and a chance to be selected as SVRMC’s 2018 Employee of the Year.

VSU Small Farm Outreach Program To Hold Farmer-Buyer ‘Meet Up’

On Wednesday, August 22, farmers and buyers will have an opportunity to “meet up” at Virginia State University’s (VSU) Randolph Farm Pavilion, 4415 River Rd., Petersburg, Virginia. The event will take place begin at 9:00 a.m. and end at 3:00 p.m.

Farmers and buyers can participate in a networking session that can lead to sales relationships and open doors for follow-up. No contracts will be signed onsite. There will be a roundtable discussion in which some of the state’s top buyers will share what they’re looking for and answer questions. Representatives from United States Development Agency Rural Development will make a presentation, and there will be a Harmonized GAP Introduction workshop.

Farmers should come prepared with business cards, and a list of products and/or a price sheet. Buyers—including wholesalers, chefs, restaurant owners, grocers and food service directors—should bring business cards and a list of products they wish to source locally.

The event is free and open to the public. Lunch will be provided. Space is limited, so register early. To register, visit www.ext.vsu.edu/calendar, click on the event and then click on the registration link. 

If you need further information or are a person with a disability and desire any assistive devices, services or other accommodations to participate in this activity, please contact Michael Carter Jr. at (804) 633-9964 or micarter@vsu.edu, or call the Small Farm Outreach Program office at (804) 524-3292 / (800) 828-1120 (TDD) during business hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. to discuss accommodations no later than five days prior to the event.

The Small Farm Outreach Program, which is part of Cooperative Extension at Virginia State University, aims to encourage and assist limited-resource, socially disadvantaged and military veteran farmers and ranchers to own, maintain and operate farms and ranches independently, to participate in agricultural programs and improve their overall farm management skills. The SFOP provides outreach and assistance activities in production management, financial management, marketing, available USDA farm programs and other areas to increase farm profitability and promote sustainability. Currently, the program provides educational programming in approximately 64 Virginia counties, which have the highest concentrations of limited-resource, socially disadvantaged and veteran farmers in the state. For more information, visit The SFOP website.

Extension is a joint program of Virginia Tech, Virginia State University, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and state and local governments. Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. An equal opportunity/ affirmative action employer. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. Edwin J. Jones, Director, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; M. Ray McKinnie, Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State University, Petersburg.

Subscribe to Emporia News RSS

Emporia News

Stories on Emporianews.com are be searchable, using the box above. All new stories will be tagged with the date (format YYYY-M-D or 2013-1-1) and the names of persons, places, institutions, etc. mentioned in the article. This database feature will make it easier for those people wishing to find and re-read an article.  For anyone wishing to view previous day's pages, you may click on the "Previous Day's Pages" link in the menu at the top of the page, or search by date (YYYY-M-D format) using the box above.

Comment Policy:  When an article or poll is open for comments feel free to leave one.  Please remember to be respectful when you comment (no foul or hateful language, no racial slurs, etc) and keep our comments safe for work and children. .Comments are moderated and comments that contain explicit or hateful words will be deleted.  IP addresses are tracked for comments. 

EmporiaNews.com serves Emporia and Greensville County, Virginia and the surrounding area
and is provided as a community service by the Advertisers and Sponsors.
All material on EmporiaNews.com is copyright 2005-2018
EmporiaNews.com is powered by Drupal and based on the ThemeBrain Sirate Theme.

Submit Your Story!

Emporia News welcomes your submissions!  You may submit articles, announcements, school or sports information using the submission forms found here, or via e-mail on news@emporianews.com.  Currently, photos and advertisements will still be accepted only via e-mail, but if you have photos to go along with your submission, you will receive instructions via e-mail. If you have events to be listed on the Community Calendar, submit them here.

Contact us at news@emporianews.com
 
EmporiaNews.com is hosted as a community Service by Telpage.  Visit their website at www.telpage.net or call (434)634-5100 (NOTICE: Telpage cannot help you with questions about Emporia New nor does Teplage have any input the content of Emporia News.  Please use the e-mail address above if you have any questions, comments or concerns about the content on Emporia News.)