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Career Opportunity

Residential Counselors

(Youth Service Workers)

 

Job#: 2017-10

If you are interested in making a positive impact on the lives of Virginia’s youth, then we want you to become part of our Team!  Rural Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facility located in Jarratt, Virginia seeks positive role models to work directly with adolescent boys and girls in a psychiatric residential treatment program.  The Youth Service Worker is responsible for role-modeling healthy behavior, teaching life skills, administering a trauma informed behavioral support program, and leading youth in and participating in social, cultural, and recreational activities.  This position supervises youth in the residential unit and on off-campus activities and appointments.

Must possess the availability to work weekends, evenings, holidays, and nights.  Supreme flexibility required. 

Seeking candidates with Bachelor’s Degrees in Psychology, Sociology or other Human Services field.   Experience will be considered in lieu of a degree.

Compensation package includes 401(k) retirement plan & employer sponsored health, dental, vision & life insurance.  JBHS is a Drug Free Workplace.  Successful applicants must pass a pre-employment drug screen and criminal background screening.  EOE.  Positions opened until filled.

E-mail cover letter and resume to:

Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services
Attn: Chris Thompson
Job # 2017-10
E-mail:careers@jacksonfeild.org

2017 Christmas Concert

Pictured: Tammy Hand, Wendy Keener, Darryl Keener, Patty Richardson, Dr. Julie Hawley, Patti Watson, Kathy Baird

GASBURG ~ The Pleasant Hill Christian Church located at 175 Ankum Road in Gasburg, Virginia cordially invites you to celebrate God’s greatest Gift of His Son, Jesus Christ, with “A Festival of Christmas Music” on Sunday, December 3, at 7:00 pm.  The Christmas Celebration will feature songs for everyone!  From Silent Night to Beautiful Star of Bethlehem, this concert is sure to usher you into the Christmas season.

The festive evening of Christmas music will be presented by Patti Watson, Kathy Baird, Wendy Keener, Darryl Keener, Patty Richardson, Tammy Hand, Dr. Julie Baird Hawley, and the Pleasant Hill Christian Church Youth and Adult Choirs.  The concert will benefit children and families of domestic violence in Brunswick, Sussex and Greensville counties.

Patti Watson is a member of Philadelphia United Methodist Church while, Kathy Baird, Patty Richardson, Wendy Keener, Darryl Keener, Dr. Julie Hawley and Tammy Hand are members of Pleasant Hill Christian Church. Together they will present medleys of familiar Christmas carols as well as songs of the season. Following the concert, you are also invited to a reception that will be held in the PHCC Family Life Center.

There is no admission fee or ticket required for the concert, however, a special love offering will be collected during the program for the Family Violence and Sexual Assault Prevention Program which is a non-profit organization that is specially designed to help victims of domestic violence and/or sexual assault.  The Family Violence Sexual Assault Unit has been serving the citizens of the City of Emporia, Greensville, Sussex and Brunswick Counties for 29 years. The unit is available to assist victims 24 hours a day, seven days a week and is manned by a small group of staff and volunteers.

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 2017 the Unit served 689 victims: 334 from Emporia, 185 from Greensville County, 128 from Brunswick County and 32 from Sussex County. 190 of the victims were under the age of 17, 97 were aged 18-24, 286 were aged 25-39, 100 were aged 40-59 and 16 were 60 and older. Helping people who are hurting and in need this Christmas season is what this event is all about. For more information regarding the concert please call the church office at (434) 577-2463.

Make Shopping Small Your Holiday Tradition

Locally-Owned Businesses Support Communities More than Large Chains

BY Acting SBA Regional Administrator Carl Knoblock

Saturday, November 25, 2017 is Small Business Saturday® – a day to celebrate and support small businesses for all they contribute to our local communities. Did you know that since 1995, small businesses generated 64 percent of new jobs, and paid 44 percent of the total United States private payroll? When we shop small –spending our money at locally-owned small businesses within our neighborhoods and towns – we help create two out of three net new local jobs.

Across the nation we are already seeing advertisements and news stories about which major chain is opening their doors on Black Friday, or even pushing employees to work on Thanksgiving Day! What you might not hear about, but should, are the mom and pop shops, the corner bakeries, and other locally-owned businesses that are competing with these national and international conglomerates. This holiday season, let’s recommit to keeping more of our hard-earned money local by supporting our neighborhood champions, America’s small businesses.

When you shop local, you’re putting your money right back into your town and neighborhood. Compared to chain stores, locally-owned businesses recycle a much larger share of their revenue back into the local economy, enriching the whole community, which means more money for local police and fire departments as well as schools and other community supported infrastructure and services. Do the math: Small businesses donate 250% more than larger businesses to non-profits and community causes. And, for every $100 you spend at a locally-owned business, roughly $68 stays in your local economy compared to only $43 from the big guys.

This Small Business Saturday®, visit your Main Street merchants to find unique, handmade gifts, and unsurpassed service that you won’t find at a big-box retailer. Afterward, dine at a locally-owned restaurant, an industry employing 14 million Americans and generating $709.2 billion in sales - equal to 4 percent of the nation’s gross domestic product. Many small restaurants are also more eco-friendly by serving local products.

To continue the entrepreneurial spirit of small businesses, the U.S. Small Business Administration Richmond District Office will do a series of “Where Are We” articles. These articles will showcase small businesses throughout the state of Virginia. Please subscribe to the Richmond District Office Govdelivery to receive articles. Remember to shop and dine small on Saturday, November 25. And, while you’re out shopping, make sure to tell us about it on social media using #SmallBizSat and #ShopSmall to amplify your support. 

For more information on local Small Business Saturday events in your area, check out: www.sba.gov/saturday

Virginia Home-Schoolers Top 40,000 for First Time

By Will Thomas, VCU Capital News Service

Alycia Wright, a Short Pump resident, used to have her own classroom where each day she taught dozens of middle-school students. That all changed after Wright had her fourth child and decided to begin home-schooling her children.

“We tried it for a year, loved the freedom and we have not stopped,” she said.

A licensed middle school teacher for 12 years with a master’s degree, Wright initially made the switch to home schooling as a financial decision: It meant saving on private-school tuition for her two daughters. After experiencing a year in the home-schooling community, Wright was more than happy to continue home-schooling her children.

Wright’s children are among more than 1,000 home-schoolers in Henrico County, where the number of students being taught at home has risen 130 percent since 2006.

Home schooling involves more than just parents teaching students. Wright praises professionals from the community who are willing to teach her children and other home-schoolers.

“Our science teacher is a veterinarian,” Wright said. “The history teacher is actually the curator of the Virginia Historical Society.”

Last year, the number of home-schoolers in Virginia eclipsed 40,000 students for the first time – an increase of 50 percent in the past decade, according to newly released statistics from the Virginia Department of Education. The agency has been collecting and reporting data on the home education population since 1994.

If home-schoolers constituted a school division, it would be the seventh-largest district in the state.

“It’s become more commonplace, it used to be regarded as somewhat fringe,” said Karen Skelton, president of the Organization of Virginia Homeschoolers. The nonprofit group, which began in 1993, provides advice and other assistance to home-schooling families.

Skelton lives in Annandale in Northern Virginia. Both of her children are home-schooled graduates.

Skelton said that every month, she hears from families frustrated with their local schools. She believes this is a major reason why more Virginians are turning to home education.

“Customizing one's education to fit the learning style – to me, that has been the biggest (reason for the) increase,” Skelton said.

She said home schooling has grown in popularity nationwide with parents becoming more involved in their children’s education. “You learn together as a family, and you do more hands on things. People come to it with an idea of, ‘This could be a real positive experience and a new lifestyle.”

Another reason for the increase in home schooling is that parents want to provide hands-on help to their children who may have learning disabilities, said Yvonne Bunn, director of legislative affairs for the Home Educators Association of Virginia. That group was formed in 1983 – the first home education organization in Virginia.

Bunn said parents often approach her with questions about home schooling. “They ask me, ‘All right – give me the facts. Tell me what the outcomes are, and I want to make a choice that’s the best thing for my family.’”

Parents are especially concerned about their children’s academic success. Bunn tells them that home schooling produces excellent results.

“We have some of the highest levels of standardized achievement tests scores. Our kids are going to college; they are getting into universities with scholarships,” Bunn said.

Editor's Note: Homeschooling in Emporia-Greensville is down 38% from 2011.

Scams on the Rise, Dominion Energy Helping Customers Fight Back

  • Scams reports from customers rose 49 percent over last year
  • Customer education and awareness are best tactics to beat scammers
  • Dominion Energy offers tips to recognize scams and stay safe

RICHMOND, Va. – Utility scams are on the rise again in Virginia and across the country. Reports of scammers calling Dominion Energy customers threatening disconnection in exchange for immediate payment has increased by 49 percent since last year.

“Customers report that the caller ID on their phone says ‘Dominion’ when they are actually being contacted by a scammer,” said Marc Gaudette, director-Corporate Security, Safety & Healthat Dominion Energy. “They are told the power to their home or business will be cut within minutes if payment (usually via a pre-paid debit card or credit card) is not provided immediately. Customers are given a fake number to call for payment, and the recording is a copy of Dominion Energy’s own phone greeting.”

Dominion Energy reminds customers that it doesn’t do business this way.

“We never threaten customers with immediate disconnection when they are behind on their bills,” said Charlene Whitfield, vice-president-Customer Service at Dominion Energy. “We contact customers by phone or in writing multiple times to work out a payment plan before disconnection occurs. The payment plan never requires payment within an hour or less.”

Dominion Energy is working with local and federal law enforcement as well as other energy companies and utilities to monitor these scams. The best defense against scams is education and awareness. This year alone, nationwide scams awareness and education has resulted in the shutdown of more than 500 bogus phone numbers.

Dominion Energy does not:

  • Use aggressive threats to disconnect service (usually within an hour or less)
  • Insist on immediate payment, over the phone
  • Request a pre-paid card to be used for payment over the phone

But customers can protect themselves and their community by remembering:

  • Never purchase a pre-paid card to avoid shut off— we will not insist on just one type of payment. You can pay in-person at a designated payment center (locations listed here) or through your online account. All payment options available are listed here.
  • Verify what you’re being told about your account.Hang up and call us at 866-DOM-HELP to confirm whether or not a payment is due, not any other number.
  • Collect information from the scammer, such as phone numbers or names, to help us and law enforcement track and spread the word to customers. 

For more information about protecting yourself against scams, visit https://www.dominionenergy.com/scams.

Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center Announces September & October 2017 Employees of the Month

Emporia, VA – Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center (SVRMC) is pleased to announce the September and October 2017 Employees of the Month: Robin Duncan and Jakai Barnes. These employees are nominated for demonstrating excellence in one of ten Standards of Behavior. As Employees of the Month, they each received a certificate of recognition, balloons, cookies to share with co-workers and a cash prize.

 

September

Nominated for demonstrating excellence in Sense of Ownership, September’s Employee of the Month, Robin Duncan, RN works in SVRMC’s Emergency Department. Ms. Duncan’s nomination included the following statement:  “Robin takes responsibility for all tasks assigned to her and ensures they are completed accurately and thoroughly.   She often takes charge of difficult situations without any hesitation, making sure that she does so in the best interest of the patient and the facility.   She is actively involved in the community and promotes SVRMC in a positive manner.  We are lucky to have Robin on our team.”

 

October

Nominated for the All-Star Award, highlighting several Standards of Behavior: Responsiveness, Attitude, and Commitment to Co-Workers, October’s Employee of the Month, Jakai Barnes, works in SVRMC’s Patient Access Department. Ms. Barnes’ nomination included the following statement:  “In addition to Jakai’s daily role as Insurance Verification Clerk, she steps in as PBX Operator, ED registrar, Outpatient Registrar, and Centralized Scheduler, as necessary.  She has the ability to wear many hats and takes pride in her work. She has a strong commitment to her co-workers as she is always willing to adjust her schedule for the needs of the department while maintaining a smile and a positive attitude.  She is an asset not only to the department, but also to SVRMC. “

Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center (SVRMC) is an 80-bed, acute-care facility located at 727 N. Main Street in Emporia, VA. With a medical staff of more than 70 physicians representing over 25 specialties, SVRMC serves nearly 50,000 residents in Emporia and the surrounding communities. The medical center is conveniently located near Interstate 95, Hwy 58 and Hwy 301. For more information about SVRMC and the services it provides, please visit SVRMC.com.

Virginia’s Growth Alliance to Award up to $90,000.00 in Business Startup and Expansion Grants

Entrepreneurs, new business startups and existing business owners are invited to participate in Virginia Growth Alliance’s 2018 Regional Business Competition, “Growing Entrepreneurs Together” (G.E.T.).

The G.E.T. business competition is designed to cultivate local economic development by inspiring and supporting local entrepreneurs and existing businesses with a desire to expand in the VGA towns of Clarksville, South Hill, and the city of Emporia.

The competition will give rise to many budding entrepreneurs and expanding businesses that have been prepared through a free 6 week bootcamp-style workshop series provided by the experts at the Longwood Small Business Development Center (LSBDC). These workshops will be instrumental in guiding participants through studying the feasibility of their proposed business, exploring business models, and developing successful business plans.

Multiple winners will be awarded prizes that range from $5k to $30k. Additionally, winners could receive other benefits that include access to a low-interest revolving loan funds, building lease rebates, local and regional business mentoring, and other local incentives to be announced.

“Although up to $30k is available for each award, we anticipate the majority of the awards to be around the $5-10k range”, explained competition organizer, Tina Morgan. “We are really excited to see what big ideas come in for the competition, and based on hat our residents and visitors are saying, we’re particularly hoping to see entries for Food Trucks, Restaurants, Brewery’s, Bakery’s, Retail, and maybe even Tasting Rooms.”

Applicants aren't limited to these communities; the VGA is hoping to see entries come in from across the country by entrepreneurs who desire to take advantage of local incentives to build in one of these named locations. “Small businesses are the lifeline of our communities around the Commonwealth. They provide jobs, they provide talent, and a sense of place.” said Jeff Reed, Executive Director of Virginia’s Growth Alliance.

“Entrepreneurship is a key component of our economic strategy, and we want to foster the development of these individuals and their ideas, particularly here in rural Virginia” Planning is underway for this exciting project and those interested are invited to join one of three upcoming (free) Lunch and Learn information sessions to be held in each of the named locations, beginning with Emporia on November 17th. Register for this session and find details about other upcoming information sessions, competition guidelines, and application by visiting www.thinkbiggervga.com and following the Get Cash links. The VGA is interested in knowing what types of businesses you’d like to see open in these areas, so you are invited to weigh in with your opinion at www.thinkbiggervga.com (click on Survey). By completing the survey, you will be entered into a drawing for a $100.00 Visa Gift Card.
For additional information or questions, contact Tina Morgan, Competition Organizer at the following email: tina@vagrowth.com or phone 434-200-8066. This initiative is made possible through seed funding from the DHCD, educational resources by the LSBDC, support and mentorship from state and local officials, additional funding resources by the SPDC, and planning and administration by the VGA. VGA includes the counties of Amelia, Brunswick, Buckingham, Charlotte, Cumberland, Greensville, Lunenburg, Mecklenburg, Nottoway, and Prince Edward, and the city of Emporia.

William W. “Billy” Dickens

William W. “Billy” Dickens, 74, passed away Friday, November 10, 2017. He was born April 26, 1943, a son of the late Warren and Marie Dickens and was also preceded in death by a daughter, Billie Jo Dickens.

He is survived by his son, William S. “Shelley” Dickens and fiance’ Jeanna; three grandchildren, William J. “Joey” Dickens (Alexis), Taylor R. Dickens (Joshua) and Christian B. Dickens; two great-grandchildren, Joshua A. Moore, Jr. “L.J.” and Bruce S. Moore; two sisters, Gayle D. Gilliland (Deb) and Myrtice D. Pinelli (Tony) and a brother, Joseph Alston “Joe” Dickens (Tina); and a devoted former daughter-in-law, Tammy H. Dickens (Johnnie).

Billy was and is still our hero and remains the strongest man we ever knew. The family would like to express their appreciation to the doctors and nurses of the ICU and CLC at McGuire VA Medical Center for their compassionate care and concern for Billy and his family.

The family will receive friends 6-8 p.m. Wednesday, November 15 at Owen Funeral Home, 303 S. Halifax Rd, Jarratt, Virginia where the funeral service will be held 11 a.m. Thursday, November 16.

Interment with military honors will follow 3 p.m. at Virginia Veterans Cemetery at Amelia, 10300 Pridesville Rd, Amelia, Virginia.

Online condolences may be shared with the family at www.owenfh.com.

SVCC Student On a Supreme Path

During his sophomore year at Buckingham County High School, Ty’Leik Chambers made a decision that focused the course of his life and set him on an education and career path that he hopes will culminate with a seat on the U.S. Supreme Court. Although Ty’Leik was a strong student, he did not feel challenged. “I wanted to do something hard,” he says. So, Ty’Leik decided to apply for admission into the Governor’s School of Southside Virginia(GSSV).

The Virginia Governor’s School Program began in 1973 to help address the needs of academically motivated young people like Ty’Leik who thrive in a demanding, interdisciplinary environment.

 GSSV, one of 19 academic-year schools within the Governor’s School program, is sponsored by the Virginia Department of Education in partnership with ten participating school divisions. Southside Virginia Community College hosts the school at its two main campuses. Students from Brunswick, Greensville, Mecklenburg (Park View High School), and Nottoway counties attend classes at SVCC’s Christanna Campus in Alberta. Ty’Leik and his classmates from Buckingham County High School along with their peers from Amelia, Charlotte, Cumberland, Lunenburg, Mecklenburg (Bluestone), and Prince Edward counties attend classes at SVCC’s John H. Daniel Campus in Keysville.

Laurie Michaelson, GSSV Director says, “We have wonderful students at GSSV, and Ty’Leik is a great example of our student body. He is intelligent, grounded, service minded, and motivated to learn.”

Ty’Leik credits his family for encouraging him. “My mom always promoted education. She encouraged me to apply to Governor’s School. She was my inspiration and was very supportive.”

His older sister was also instrumental. “Instead of reading just stories, she would read to me out of her text books. I still remember some of the facts she read.”

Now in his senior year, Ty’Leik reflects on his education journey so far, “It’s been way better than I expected. I have friends from other counties who are people like me, people who really value the education and opportunities they have and do not waste it.”

One of his teachers, Leslie Poling, says, “Ty'Leik is a wonderful student. He is equally adept at being a leader and a worker bee. He also knows when to take each role. I had him in chemistry last year and research this year. He is hard working, a high achiever, and able to work well with anyone.”

Research is a key component of the GSSV curriculum. All students are a required participate in the development and execution of an original, two-year research project. Ty’Leik’s project focuses on a safety issue. “If someone is cooking on a grill, it can start a fire if it is too close to the house.” With two other students, he is investigating a way to determine if the type of paint used on a building’s exterior impacts its risk of catching on fire. Ty’Leik and his group will present their findings at a research symposium to be held on SVCC’s Daniel Campus.

The opportunity to conduct and present original research makes an impressive entry on students’ college applications, and Ty’Leik has ambitious plans for his future. “After graduation, I would like to attend the University of Virginia with a double major in pre-law and American studies, or at least a minor in American Studies. After graduation from UVA, I’d like to go to Harvard Law School.” He also has his ideal career path plotted. “I’d like to become a district attorney, then a judge, and then a justice on the Supreme Court.”

He explains, “I grew up hearing stories of great African Americans who influenced and shaped the direction of our country.” Ty’Leik hopes to follow in the footsteps of some of these great Americans.

Ty’Leik is eager to take up that mantle of leadership and help steer the nation toward a brighter future. To students who may be considering applying to GSSV, he offers this advice: “Yes. It can be a challenge. But it can be overcome. Classes are hard but the relationships with the teachers and the knowledge they provide makes it possible. GSSV is a wise and smart decision.”

For information about GGSV, visit gssv.southside.edu

SVCC Student On a Supreme Path

During his sophomore year at Buckingham County High School, Ty’Leik Chambers made a decision that focused the course of his life and set him on an education and career path that he hopes will culminate with a seat on the U.S. Supreme Court. Although Ty’Leik was a strong student, he did not feel challenged. “I wanted to do something hard,” he says. So, Ty’Leik decided to apply for admission into the Governor’s School of Southside Virginia(GSSV).

The Virginia Governor’s School Program began in 1973 to help address the needs of academically motivated young people like Ty’Leik who thrive in a demanding, interdisciplinary environment.

 GSSV, one of 19 academic-year schools within the Governor’s School program, is sponsored by the Virginia Department of Education in partnership with ten participating school divisions. Southside Virginia Community College hosts the school at its two main campuses. Students from Brunswick, Greensville, Mecklenburg (Park View High School), and Nottoway counties attend classes at SVCC’s Christanna Campus in Alberta. Ty’Leik and his classmates from Buckingham County High School along with their peers from Amelia, Charlotte, Cumberland, Lunenburg, Mecklenburg (Bluestone), and Prince Edward counties attend classes at SVCC’s John H. Daniel Campus in Keysville.

Laurie Michaelson, GSSV Director says, “We have wonderful students at GSSV, and Ty’Leik is a great example of our student body. He is intelligent, grounded, service minded, and motivated to learn.”

Ty’Leik credits his family for encouraging him. “My mom always promoted education. She encouraged me to apply to Governor’s School. She was my inspiration and was very supportive.”

His older sister was also instrumental. “Instead of reading just stories, she would read to me out of her text books. I still remember some of the facts she read.”

Now in his senior year, Ty’Leik reflects on his education journey so far, “It’s been way better than I expected. I have friends from other counties who are people like me, people who really value the education and opportunities they have and do not waste it.”

One of his teachers, Leslie Poling, says, “Ty'Leik is a wonderful student. He is equally adept at being a leader and a worker bee. He also knows when to take each role. I had him in chemistry last year and research this year. He is hard working, a high achiever, and able to work well with anyone.”

Research is a key component of the GSSV curriculum. All students are a required participate in the development and execution of an original, two-year research project. Ty’Leik’s project focuses on a safety issue. “If someone is cooking on a grill, it can start a fire if it is too close to the house.” With two other students, he is investigating a way to determine if the type of paint used on a building’s exterior impacts its risk of catching on fire. Ty’Leik and his group will present their findings at a research symposium to be held on SVCC’s Daniel Campus.

The opportunity to conduct and present original research makes an impressive entry on students’ college applications, and Ty’Leik has ambitious plans for his future. “After graduation, I would like to attend the University of Virginia with a double major in pre-law and American studies, or at least a minor in American Studies. After graduation from UVA, I’d like to go to Harvard Law School.” He also has his ideal career path plotted. “I’d like to become a district attorney, then a judge, and then a justice on the Supreme Court.”

He explains, “I grew up hearing stories of great African Americans who influenced and shaped the direction of our country.” Ty’Leik hopes to follow in the footsteps of some of these great Americans.

Ty’Leik is eager to take up that mantle of leadership and help steer the nation toward a brighter future. To students who may be considering applying to GSSV, he offers this advice: “Yes. It can be a challenge. But it can be overcome. Classes are hard but the relationships with the teachers and the knowledge they provide makes it possible. GSSV is a wise and smart decision.”

For information about GGSV, visit gssv.southside.edu

How to Start College with an Advantage

By Dr. Al Roberts

Dual enrollment programs operate as collaborative partnerships between high schools and colleges. They offer students who meet prerequisite requirements an opportunity to jumpstart collegiate and professional careers by earning college credits while still in high school.

Dual enrollment differs from other accelerated learning options in significant ways. For example, in Advanced Placement (AP) programs, students receive high school credit for passing approved courses, but the conferring of college credit is conditional. It depends on a student’s choice to take a qualifying exam (20–30% do not) and then on the score ultimately received. In dual enrollment programs, students take actual college courses from appropriately credentialed teachers. Credits earned through dual enrollment appear on the student’s permanent college transcript.

The National Student Clearinghouse Research Center and the Community College Research Center at Columbia University recently examined dual enrollment programs. Their study, published in September 2017, reported that students who work on college courses concurrently with high school completion were more likely than their peers to graduate from high school, attend college, and earn a college credential. The study also found that students with as little as one term’s participation also accrued benefits. Among students from Virginia, educational attainment for dually enrolled students surpassed national averages.

The ability of dual enrollment to reduce the total cost of degree or credential attainment is perhaps the best-known advantage of dual enrollment, but programs also confer other benefits. For students who are the first in their families to attend college and for those from groups that are traditionally underserved by institutions of higher education, dual enrollment courses offer a preliminary look at what college work will require. Participating helps these young adults develop the confidence they need to persist and achieve their goals. For students focused on technical and professional credentials, dual enrollment options help them acquire the knowledge and develop the skills necessary to be competitive in the workforce.

At Southside Virginia Community College, our dual enrollment program seeks to expand a tradition of higher education across our region. Approximately 70% of SVCC’s dual enrollment students pursue either an Associate of Arts and Sciences (AA&S) degree, which will transfer to most of Virginia’s four-year colleges and universities, or a Career Studies Certificate (CSC) in a technical or professional area. These areas include welding, automotive diagnosis and tune-up, high-performance technology, advanced manufacturing, computer-related fields, and nurse aide. About 30% of our dual enrollment students take classes to accumulate a few college credits or to skip introductory-level classes. During the most recently completed academic year, graduating dually enrolled seniors earned 252 Associates Degrees, 35 General Education Certificates, and 230 Career Studies Certificates.

For more information about dual enrollment opportunities at SVCC, contact Katherine Clatterbuck, Dual Enrollment Coordinator (434-736-2080 or katherine.clatterbuck@southside.edu).

Dr. Al Roberts is president of Southside Virginia Community College, an institution of higher learning that provides a wide variety of education opportunities to a diverse student population within a service area that spans ten counties and the city of Emporia. He can be reached via email at al.roberts@southside.edu.

ALICE SMITH BIVENS

Alice Smith Bivens, age 81, of Emporia, VA, died Monday, November 13, 2017, at Dunlop House Assisted Living and Memory Center, Colonial Heights, VA.

Mrs. Bivens, was born in Greensville County, VA the daughter of the late Pender Lee Smith, Sr. and Virginia Harrell Smith; she was pre-deceased by two sons, Mike Lee and Joe Bivens.   She was a devoted mother and homemaker.

Surviving are: Her husband Billy Joe Bivens; two daughters, Pat B. Clary and her husband Wilson of Emporia, VA and Amy Pollard Lifsey of Roanoke Rapids, NC; A brother Alfred Smith and his wife Christine of Emporia, VA; 4 grandchildren, Heather Lifsey Barnes of Lucama, NC, Katie Clary Richardson of Gasburg, VA, Kelly Clary of Emporia, VA, Kendall Clary of Sutherland, VA; three great grandchildren, Ryan Barnes and Ben Barnes both of Lucama, NC and Kenzie Clary of Emporia, VA.

Graveside services will be held in Greensville Memorial Cemetery, Emporia, VA, Wednesday, November 15, 2017, at 2:00PM, with Rev, Rick Ragan officiating.

Memorial donations may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association, 6350 Center St., Suite 102, Norfolk, Va. 23502.

Online condolences may be sent to the family at: www.echolsfuneralhome.com

Fund Children’s Health Program, Va. Officials Tell Congress

By Alan Rodriguez Espinoza, VCU Capital News Service

RICHMOND – Medical coverage for more than 60,000 children and 1,000 pregnant women in Virginia lies in the hands of Congress, which has yet to reach a decision on how to fund the Children’s Health Insurance Program.

CHIP is an extension of Medicaid that provides government-funded health insurance to children and pregnant women from families who earn too much to qualify for Medicaid but not enough to afford private health insurance.

Congress missed the Sept. 30 deadline to reauthorize federal funding for CHIP.

The problem is “one of benign neglect,” Karen Remley, CEO of the American Academy of Pediatrics, said in a press release. “As efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act dominated the agenda in the Senate, needed attention to CHIP was lost.”

In a letter to the Virginia congressional delegation, Gov. Terry McAuliffe said “partisan infighting and dysfunction” in Congress have jeopardized the state’s CHIP-funded program, called Family Access to Medical Insurance Security. McAuliffe and other Democrats blame Republicans for the problem.

McAuliffe estimated that 66,000 children and 1,100 pregnant women in Virginia depend on FAMIS to receive medical services such as immunizations, checkups and even surgeries and cancer treatments.

Virginia’s Department of Medical Assistance Services estimates that nearly 1,200 of those children live in Richmond.

In response to McAuliffe, U.S. Rep. Scott Taylor, a Republican from Virginia Beach, said that “scaring families via press release is not helpful.”

“It is completely disingenuous to insinuate that I or any other member of the Virginia congressional delegation are ignoring reauthorization of this important program,” Taylor stated in a press release of his own. “In fact, the present delay is a result of a request by the minority party to further negotiations on offsets.”

U.S. senators including Virginia Democrats Mark Warner and Tim Kaine have expressed bipartisan support for the Keep Kids’ Insurance Dependable and Secure Act, or the KIDS Act of 2017. If ratified, it would extend federal funding for CHIP through the 2022 fiscal year.

“Sen. Warner recognizes it is essential that CHIP is reauthorized,” said Jonathan Uriarte, his deputy press secretary. “And the KIDS Act is an imperfect but needed compromise to continue funding these necessary health care services for children.”

But the KIDS Act does not specify where funding for CHIP would come from.

On Friday, the House voted 242-174 to reauthorize CHIP under the Championing Healthy Kids Act. Democrats opposed the bill because it would cut more than $10 billion from public health and prevention programs funded by the Affordable Care Act and because it would raise Medicare fees for higher-income recipients.

Rep. Pete Olson, R-Texas, said on the House floor that the Healthy Kids Act would extend CHIP “without adding to our country’s deficit.” On the other hand, Rep. Donald McEachin, a Democrat from Richmond, said the bill is “loaded with poison pills that would undermine the Affordable Care Act, Medicare and Medicaid.”

According to the Department of Medical Assistance Services, CHIP in Virginia cost more than $304 million in fiscal year 2017, with most of the money coming from the federal government. McAuliffe said Virginia is expected to exhaust the federal funds by the end of January.

“Unless something changes, DMAS will be forced to send letters on Dec. 1, 2017, notifying families of the impending loss of coverage,” McAuliffe stated. “Enrollment will be frozen Jan. 1, 2018, and by Jan. 31, Virginia will have insufficient federal funds to continue the program.”

The House and Senate must agree on a bill before it can be sent to President Donald Trump for his signature.

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