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Hello Kitty Truck rolls into Richmond on Saturday

By Amelia Heymann, Capital News Service

RICHMOND – Hello Kitty fans, rejoice. On Saturday, the Hello Kitty Cafe Truck, described as “a mobile vehicle of cuteness,” will make its first visit to Richmond.

The truck will be at Short Pump Town Center, 11800 W. Broad St., from 10 a.m. until 8 p.m. The vehicle will be near the mall’s main entrance by Crate & Barrel and Pottery Barn.

The Hello Kitty Cafe Truck has been traveling nationwide since its debut at the 2014 Hello Kitty Con, a convention for fans of the iconic character produced by the Japanese company Sanrio. The truck has made stops in major cities from Washington, D.C., to Los Angeles.

The mobile cafe will be selling sweets and other items, including macarons, mini cakes and bow-shaped water bottles. According to Yelp reviews, treats cost around $15. Besides food, you can purchase souvenirs such as a Hello Kitty Cafe Truck T-shirts and mugs.

Because of the success of the truck, Sanrio opened the Hello Kitty Pop-Up Container in Irvine, California, last July. The pop-up store, which will be there only for a year, was founded to spread “a message of happiness, friendship, and fun through yummy goodies and beverages featuring Hello Kitty and other Sanrio friends.”

For updates about the truck’s visit to Richmond and other cities, you can follow the venture’s postings on Facebook, Twitterand Instagram.

Pender Lee Smith, Jr.

Pender Lee Smith, Jr., 84, of Emporia, Virginia died on Wednesday, March 22, 2017. Pender was born on April 2, 1932 in the Brink area of Greensville County and was a life-long resident.

Farming was in his blood, and never was he happier than when he was on a tractor or combine on his farm. He was also a partner in PL Smith and Sons Peanut Warehouse. Pender was loved by many and had friends near and far. He had a winning smile and never met a stranger. Pender had a warm laugh and quick wit. He loved the outdoors and was an avid fisherman, hunter, bird watcher, gardener, and loved to do woodwork in his shop on the farm.

Pender was married to the love of his life, Jo Anne Hancock for 62 years. Together Pender and Jo could be found spending time with friends and family; often going out to eat, dancing, or just visiting.

Pender was active in church, civic, and community organizations. He was a Christian and was a member of the Forest Hill Baptist Church. There he served as a Trustee, Deacon, and was on numerous committees over his 60 year membership. Pender was a charter member of the Brink Ruritan Club where he was a past president and secretary. Pender was on the Greensville County Farm Bureau Board of Directors and served as treasurer. He was also a member of the Virginia Farm Bureau Peanut Advisory Committee. For many years Pender served on the Greensville County Farm Committee.

Pender was preceded in death by his parents, Pender Lee Smith and Virginia Harrell Smith, and his beloved son, David Smith. He is survived by his wife, Jo Anne Hancock Smith; sister, Alice Smith Bivins (Billy Joe); brother, Alfred Smith (Christine), sisters-in-law, Alma Lanier of Roanoke Rapids and Hazel Welch of Pinehurst; special niece, Angela Fanney (Rick) of Smithfield; and many other much loved nieces, nephews, and great nieces and nephews.

A funeral service will be held on Saturday, March 25, 2017 at Forest Hill Baptist Church, Skippers, VA. at 2:00 pm followed by interment in the church cemetery. Memorial donations may be made to the cemetery fund at Forest Hill Baptist Church, c/o Michael Ferguson, 5070 Brink Road, Emporia, VA 23847. Condolences may be sent to www.Echolsfuneralhome.com

STUDENT IS PROUD OF HER GED® ACCOMPLISHMENT

Due to unfortunate circumstances, Julie Boyd of Blackstone, was unable to complete high school. 

“I've talked about getting my GED ever since. I am 21 years old and it took me two weeks to obtain it. I couldn't be more proud of myself,” she said.

She noted that the person that inspired her to move forward with her education is her recently deceased brother. 

“He was my 18 year old brother, his name was Joshua Baughan. He died in a car accident December 21, 2016. He was my best friend, my rock. He pushed me every day to do better for myself. When he passed away, it showed me life was too short to take the small things for granted,” she said. 

She also added that he lived his life to the fullest and accomplished everything he started.   

“He inspired me on so many levels. I did this, not just for me, but for him as well. I will work hard and succeed in everything I do, because he is always with me. This achievement means so much to me. But it's only a start,” she said.

Boyd also has a fiancé’ who has also played a huge roll in her life.

“He supports me in everything I do, and he has stood by my side faithfully for three years. I am very thankful to have him in my life. I love all of my family and friends. I wouldn't be where I am today without them,” she said.

 She plans to continue her education in the nursing field or forensic science.   

Her advice to others, you can do anything you put your mind to if you believe in yourself.

“Never give up. Knowledge is power. With power you can do great things in life. I am grateful for the support of my family. They never gave up on me,” she said.

Southside Virginia Community College offers Adult Basic Education and GED® preparation.  For information, call 434-949-1090.  The schedule of classes is below.

Brunswick

SVCC

Christanna Campus

SVCC

Christanna Campus

 

 

Monday-Thursday

 

Monday & Wednesday

 

 

9:00 am – 12:00 noon

 

5:30 pm – 8:30 pm

 

 

Brown

 

A. Lewis

Mecklenburg

Boydton Library

 

Chase City Estes Ctr

 

Clarksville YMCA

 

South Hill LCAKC

 

South Hill Bank Building

South Hill Bank Building

 

Tuesday & Thursday

 

Tuesday & Thursday

 

Monday & Tuesday

 

Monday & Wednesday

 

Monday & Wednesday

 

Tuesday & Thursday

 

5:00 pm - 8:00 pm

 

9:00 am - 12:00 noon

 

5:30 pm - 8:00 pm

 

9:00 am - 12:00 pm

 

5:30 pm - 8:30 pm

 

5:30 pm - 8:30 pm

 

Cherry

 

Wilson

 

Kindley

 

McCarthy

 

Scott

 

F. Lewis

 Halifax

SVHEC

South Boston

SVHEC

South Boston

 

 

Monday - Thursday

 

Tuesday & Thursday

 

 

9:00 am – 12:00 noon

 

5:30 pm – 8:30 pm

 

 

Stafford/Clarke

 

Clarke

Online

Sunday - Saturday

Anytime

McCarthy

Virginia raises a toast to George Washington’s whiskey

By Megan Corsano, Capital News Service

RICHMOND – George Washington is recognized as the father of our country, but with a bill signed into law by Gov. Terry McAuliffe, Washington also will be recognized under another title – distiller of Virginia’s official liquor.

SB 1261, sponsored by Sen. Adam Ebbin of Alexandria, adds a “state spirit” to the list of the commonwealth’s official emblems and designations and crowns George Washington’s rye whiskey with the title.

The bill, which McAuliffe signed last week, highlights George Washington’s contributions to the culture of Virginia as “a native son of Virginia born on February 22, 1732, in Pope’s Creek”; “the first American president, commander of the Continental Army, and president of the Constitutional Convention”; and “a model statesman ... universally acknowledged as the father of our nation.”

According to the bill, Washington was also a “gentleman planter” who began distilling rye whiskey on his property at Mount Vernon in early 1797 at the suggestion of James Anderson, his farm manager.

Today, the staff at Mount Vernon continues to distill the whiskey for sale at the property’s gift shop.

In a speech on the floor of the Virginia Senate on Feb. 22, Washington’s 285th birthday, Ebbin explained the historical pairing of Washington’s political career and booze.

According to Ebbin’s speech, when Washington first ran for the House of Burgesses in Frederick County in 1755, he lost by a landslide, receiving only 40 of the 581 votes. Ebbin attributed this loss to his failure to provide “bumbo” – a common practice at the time to provide alcohol to voters.

Three years later, Washington tried once more to win over voters and won, but switched his campaigning technique.

“During that election, he supplied 28 gallons of rum, 50 gallons of rum punch, 34 gallons of wine, 46 gallons of beer and 2 gallons of cider (an impressive 160 gallons of liquor) to 391 voters,” Ebbin said during his commemoration speech. “That’s more than a quart and a half per voter. Washington had clearly learned his lesson, because a key to victory was ‘swilling the planters with bumbo.’”

After retiring from politics, Washington began distilling whiskey at his Mount Vernon property. In the year of Washington’s death – 1799 – the distillery produced nearly 11,000 gallons of whiskey.

The Mount Vernon distillery was reconstructed at the original location that Washington used and produces small batches of distilled spirit for sale on site, including the rye whiskey that now holds the state title. The distillery attempts to produce the whiskey through the same techniques that Washington would have used at the time.

Besides declaring the official state spirit, McAuliffe also signed a bill designating the TV show “Song of the Mountains” as Virginia’s official state television series.

SB 1332, sponsored by Sen. Charles Carrico of Galax, noted that “Song of the Mountains” is the first nationwide television program featuring the bluegrass music of Appalachia.

The show was founded in 2003 as a monthly stage concert series hosted by the Lincoln Theatre in Marion, Virginia. “Song of the Mountains” is broadcast on more than 150 PBS stations in about 30 states.

The program “continues to consistently present to the nation the unique musical and cultural heritage of not only the Southwest region of the state but the entire Commonwealth,” the bill stated.

Middle School Forensics Competition

On Friday, March 17th, Brunswick Academy’s fifth, sixth, and seventh grade Middle School Forensics Team participated in the AVA Forensics Competition at Kenston Forest School. This exceptional group of students left the competition with third place in fifth grade, second place in sixth grade, and first place in seventh grade. Overall, the Middle School Forensics Team placed second in the competition. The students who participated and their rankings are as follows:

Fifth Grade

5th grade photo - Front (l to r) - Charlie Pope, Natalie Hall*, Bryn Montgomery*, Lane Whitehead, Madalynn Writtenberry. Back(l to r) Savannah Nunnally*, Chris Parrish, Denver Wright, and Berkeley Jones*.

Girls’ Prose – Madalynn Writtenberry, Boys’ Prose – Chris Parrish, Girls’ Poetry – Lane Whitehead, Boys’ Poetry – Charlie Pope, Girls’ Monologue – Bryn Montgomery – 3rd Place, Boys’ Monologue – Berkeley Jones – 2nd Place, Serious Speech – Savannah Nunnally – 3rd Place, Humorous Speech – Denver Wright, Spelling – Natalie Hall – 1st Place

Sixth Grade

6th grade photo - Front (l to r) - Cullen Corum, Rahilly Abernathy*, Allie Short*, Ashton Phillips*. Back (l to r) - Cassidy Smith*, Meredith Greene*, Katie Lambert, Matthew Gullivan*,  and Davis Whitehead*.

Girls’ Prose – Allie Short – 1st Place, Boys’ Prose – Ashton Phillips – 1st Place, Girls’ Poetry – Rahilly Abernathy – 2nd Place, Boys’ Poetry – Matthew Gullivan – 1st Place, Girls’ Monologue – Meredith Greene – 1st Place, Boys’ Monologue – Davis Whitehead – 3rd Place, Serious Speech – Cassidy Smith – 2nd Place, Humorous Speech – Katie Lambert, Spelling – Cullen Corum

Seventh Grade

7th grade photo - Front (l to r) - Alora Decorte, Harrison Harper*, Vincent Edmunds*, Lydia Smith*, Bryson Poarch*.  Back (l to r) - Shana Love*, Alyssa Rivas*, Emily Roberts*, and Brett Allen*.

Girls’ Prose – Lydia Smith – 1st Place, Boys’ Prose – Vincent Edmunds – 2nd Place, Girls’ Poetry – Alyssa Rivas – 3rd Place, Boys’ Poetry – Brett Allen – 2nd Place, Girls’ Monologue – Shana Love – 1st Place, Boys’ Monologue – Harrison Harper – 2nd Place, Serious Speech – Alora DeCorte, Humorous Speech – Emily Roberts – 1st Place, Spelling – Bryson Poarch – 1st Place

*denotes placed in their category

The Good News about Shoulder, Knee and Hip Joints

Community Out-Reach Education

South Hill – Joints can be damaged by arthritis and other diseases or injuries.  Arthritis, or simply years of use may cause the joint to wear away.  This can cause pain, stiffness, and swelling.  Your doctor may suggest a joint replacement to improve your quality of life.  When something goes wrong with the shoulder, hip and knee joints, what are the options for treatment?  Can joint injections help?  What can joint protection exercise/therapy do for you?

If you are seeking answers to questions like these you should attend June’s C.O.R.E. (Community Out-Reach Education) Program at VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital’s Rehab & Exercise Therapy Center to learn more about shoulder, knee and hip joints.

This FREE program will be on Thursday, March 23rd at 11:00 a.m. in the CMH Rehab and Exercise Therapy Center located at 750 Lombardy Street in South Hill.

Patti Turczany, PT, LAT, MS, CDT/MLD will be the speaker for the program.  Patti received her Bachelor’s degree from Southern Connecticut State University, a Master’s degree in Education with a concentration in Athletics from Fort Hayes State University in Kansas and a Master of Science degree from the University of Indianapolis Krannert School of Physical Therapy.  She holds an oncology certification, complete complex decongestive therapy certification in lymph drainage and has pediatric specialty.  She is McKenzie trained in treatment of spine therapy, has manual skills training in therapy, orthopedic training and is a certified licensed athletic trainer.

Other joint information classes for 2017 will be held from 11:00AM – 12:00PM at the CMH Rehab and Exercise Therapy Center on the following dates:  May 11, August 10, October 12. 

Reservations are not required for this program; however, they are recommended.  For more information or to register to attend, please call (434) 774-2506.

Photo:

Patti Turczany, PT, LAT, MS, CDT/MLD

Walk seeks to raise awareness about eating disorders

 

By Amelia Heymann, Capital News Service

RICHMOND – Bayan Atari, a public relations major at Virginia Commonwealth University, has spent nine months in treatment for an invisible ailment. Two of her friends have died from the disorder. Atari is one of 30 million Americans struggling with an eating disorder.

Despite the prevalence and severity of the condition, Atari and others have had trouble getting help. That’s because many people have misconceptions about eating disorders, experts say.

“If you’re not underweight, they might not take you seriously. At my sickest, I was still at a normal weight, and that was enough to be like, ‘Well, you’re not dying, you have an electrolyte imbalance, but you’re not dead,’” Atari said. “Even in the medical system, I’ve known people whose kidneys were failing, but because they were overweight or normal weight, they were not given the care they needed.”

Efforts are underway to bring attention to eating disorders.

On Saturday, the National Eating Disorders Association will hold its first NEDA Walk in Richmond in hopes of raising awareness about the problem. The walk will begin at 10 a.m. at the VCU Commons Plaza.

Kristen Tully, the organizer of the walk, expects 200 to 300 people to participate.

Tully decided to organize the walk because she herself is in recovery. When she was in the throes of her eating disorder, Richmond didn’t have an eating disorder clinic or other resources to help.

However, in the last five years, more resources have popped up. One is Stay Strong Virginia, which has compiled lists and maps of treatment programs and support groups for people with eating disorders. Stay Strong Virginia helped Tully organize Saturday’s walk.

Another resource is Veritas Collaborative, a treatment center for eating disorderson Broad Street. Veritas is a sponsor of the NEDA Walk.

It’s important to get someone with an eating disorder into treatment because the illness can be fatal. Someone dies from their eating disorder every 62 minutes, according to the Eating Disorders Coalition.

The main kinds of eating disorders are:

  • Anorexia, or restricted eating. This can lead to severe dehydration, which sometimes results in kidney failure.
  • Bulimia, or binging and purging. This can cause inflammation and possible rupture of the esophagus from repeated vomiting.
  • Binge eating, or eating to excess. This can cause high blood pressure, diabetes and other health problems.

Meredith Kerley, a therapist who specializes in eating disorders, said getting treatment is important, but recovery involves more than that.

“I always say the work really begins when someone leaves treatment,” Kerley said. “Treatment is a kind of way to break the pattern and get one’s body into a healthy place. Once they leave that bubble, there’s the pressure of doing all these things whether or not someone tells them to. It’s far from cured when someone leaves treatment.”

Tully agreed. She said recovery is never linear. “It’s hills and valleys, and recovery isn’t easy. It’s the hardest thing you will ever do.”

Not everyone with an eating disorder is lucky enough to get treatment. Only one-third of people suffering from anorexia receive treatment – and only 6 percent of those suffering bulimia.

Part of this may be due to the stigma of an eating disorder. According to a 2010 study, 12 percent of people surveyed believed eating disorders are related to vanity. Kerley said that notion is patently false.

“There’s always emotion underlying it (the eating disorder),” Kerley said. “It’s not about the food, and it’s not the vanity, but that’s how it manifests.”

For Atari, the trigger was personal issues rather than her body image.

“I was miserable,” Atari said. That is when she turned to using bulimia. “The terrible part is that it works. You need to cope with something, and it works, and I couldn’t see anything else working as well.”

Eating disorders are often accompanied by other mental illnesses, such as depression and anxiety.

“Sometimes, eating disorders do develop as a way to cope with anxiety or depression,” Kerley said. “Other times, malnutrition can certainly affect the brain and cause depression.” She said it can be hard to tell which mental illness comes first.

It also can be impossible to tell who has an eating disorder and who doesn’t. Kerley has had 20 to 30 patients over the years, ranging in age from 12 to 50. Many have been of normal weight, and the patients include men.

“There’s kind of a stigma it’s an adolescent girl’s issue, but I see the whole range, and again, it is males and females,” Kerley said.

More about Saturday’s NEDA Walk

You can register for the walk on the NEDA website. Online registration ends Friday, but that’s to guarantee getting a T-shirt. People also can register in person at 9:30 a.m. Saturday at the VCU Commons Plaza, 907 Floyd Ave., Richmond. If you can’t walk, you can sponsor a walker or make a donation on the NEDA website.

New laws target puppy mills and allow lifetime pet licenses

By Ashley Luck, Capital News Service

RICHMOND – Virginia soon will have three new laws that will impact its furry residents and their owners. Gov. Terry McAuliffe has signed bills that will bar pet stores from buying dogs from unscrupulous sellers, allow local governments to offer lifetime pet licenses and change the legal description of a “dangerous dog.”

McAuliffe signed the legislation last week. The bills will take effect July 1.

SB 852, introduced by Sen. William Stanley, R-Franklin, is aimed at brokers and breeders who sell dogs to pet shops. The new statute says the seller must have a valid license from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Moreover, pet stores may not procure a dog “from a person who has received citations for one critical violation or three or more noncritical violations from the USDA in the two years prior to receiving the dog,” according to a summary of the bill by the Legislative Information System.

Violating the law will be a Class 1 misdemeanor for each dog sold or offered for sale. That is punishable by up to a year in jail and a $2,500 fine.

Tabitha Treloar, director of communications at the Richmond SPCA, said the organization is grateful for the new law.

“SB 852 closed loopholes in a section of code that became law in 2015, making it clear that pet stores may not acquire pets either directly or indirectly from puppy mills,” Treloar said. “While adopting from a reputable shelter or humane society will always be the best way to get a new companion, this is a law that helps to protect Virginia customers, and we are grateful to Sen. Stanley for carrying this bill and to Gov. McAuliffe for signing it into law.”

McAuliffe also signed HB 1477, sponsored by Del. Robert Orrock, R-Caroline County. It will allow local governments to provide lifetime licenses for cats and dogs for a maximum fee of $50. (The cost of an annual pet license will remain at up to $10.)

The lifetime license will be valid if the animal’s owner continues to reside in the locality and keeps up the animal’s rabies vaccinations. If an animal’s tag is lost, destroyed or stolen, the legislation sets a $1 fee for getting a duplicate tag.

The bill also states that local ordinances can require an animal to have an identifying microchip.

Pet owners must get a license for any dog or cat that is 4 months or older. Guide dogs or service dogs that serve disabled people are exempt.

McAuliffe also signed HB 2381, sponsored by Del. Matthew Farris, R-Rustburg. It modifies the legal description of a “dangerous dog.” It’s a designation with big ramifications: If a dog is officially labeled as dangerous, it is listed in an online registry, and the owner must get insurance and pay a $150 annual fee.

Farris wanted to give a dog the benefit of the doubt if it bites a person or another animal. The bill will give animal control officers the option of determining whether a dog should be considered dangerous just because it inflicts a nip, scratch or minor injury on someone, or on another pet.

Matthew Gray, Virginia state director of the Humane Society of the United States, applauded McAuliffe for signing the bills but was disappointed that other legislation failed during the General Assembly’s 2017 session.

“We are grateful that these bills have been signed by Gov. McAuliffe, who has traditionally supported our agenda,” Gray said. “But the House of Delegates defeated nine of 11 bills that would have expanded protections for animals, including bills to protect dogs from living their lives at the end of a chainand to prevent indiscriminate euthanasia in animal shelters. That’s a dismal failure and a profound illustration of the challenge animal welfare advocates face in Virginia.”

In Honor of National Healthcare Decisions Day, Local Non-profit Convenes Important Conversations

Crater Community Hospice Hosts Screenings of PBS "Being Mortal" and Coffee Chat on Estate Planning

Petersburg, March 20, 2017 --- Crater Community Hospice will offer three events as part of the organization's recognition of National Healthcare Decisions Day (NHDD). This annual event aims to help people across the U.S. understand the value of advance healthcare planning. For 2017, NHDD will be a week-long event, from April 16 to 22.

Two free screenings of the PBS program "Being Mortal," paired with panel discussions with local experts will be held on April 4th and April 12th, one in Petersburg and one in Chesterfield. 

A free Coffee Chat with Mike Perdue on "Avoiding Family Conflict in Estate Planning" will take place at Crater Community Hospice in Petersburg on April 6th.  

Each event will be part of a national dialog that asks "Have you and your family had the tough conversations and planned ahead?" Certificates of Attendance are available.

Tuesday, April 4, 2017: Being Mortal - Screening and Panel Discussion

9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. (Registration begins at 9:00 am with program to begin at 9:20)

Bethia United Methodist Church

10700 Winterpock Road Chesterfield, VA 23832

Sponsored by Crater Community Hospice and the Office of the Chesterfield County Senior Advocate

Free, please rsvp by March 31, 2017

Thursday, April 6, 2017: Coffee Chat on Avoiding Family Conflict in Estate Planning

8:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.

Crater Community Hospice

3916 S. Crater Road, Petersburg, VA 23805

Free, please rsvp by April 4, 2017

Wednesday, April 12, 2017: Being Mortal - Screening and Panel Discussion

2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. (Registration begins at 2:00 pm with program to begin at 2:20)

Southside Regional Medical Center

200 Medical Park Blvd, Petersburg, VA 23805

A/B Classroom on the first floor

Free, please rsvp by April 10, 2017

"Being Mortal" delves into the hopes of patients and families facing terminal illness. The film investigates the practice of caring for the dying and explores the relationships between patients and their doctors. It follows a surgeon, Dr. Atul Gawande, as he shares stories from the people and families he encounters. When Dr. Gawande's own father gets cancer, his search for answers about how to best care for the dying becomes a personal quest. After the screening, attendees can participate in a guided conversation on concrete steps to identify and communicate wishes about end-of-life goals and preferences. The free screenings of "Being Mortal" are made possible by a grant from The John and Wauna Harman Foundation in partnership with the Hospice Foundation of America.

Every month Crater Community Hospice hosts a free coffee chat providing an educational presentation and networking opportunities. This month, local attorney Mike Purdue of Paul/Perdue Attorneys presents "Avoiding Family Conflict in Estate Planning." Mr. Purdue will discuss planning strategies to help maintain family harmony. He will cover an overview of specific aspects of pre-planning including estates, wills, trusts, and advance directives.

For more information, or to RSVP contact Patti Cox  at pox@cratercommunityhospice.org or (804) 526-4300.

 

Public Notice

Call to Democratic Party Caucus

Virginia 75th House of Delegates District

1. Call. Pursuant to the Democratic Party Plan of Virginia ("the Party Plan"), the 75th House     District Nominating Committee ("the Committee") hereby calls an Unassembled Caucus for the sole purpose of choosing a Democratic nominee for the 75th House of Delegates District ("the 75th District").

2. Caucus Rules, Forms, and Information. Caucus Rules, along with other pertinent forms and information about the nominating process, may be obtained from Kyle Williamson, Chair of the 75th House District Democratic Nominating Committee any time at drkylewilliamson@yahoo.com or (434) 532-2672

3. General Participation Requirements. Each participant in the Caucus must be a qualified voter in the 75th District at the time of their participation. No participant in the Caucus may intend to support any candidate who is opposed to the Democratic nominee in that Special Election.

4. Voting Opportunities. Participants in the Caucus may vote only in person and at the following location (Note: Each voter may arrive during the time listed below, cast his or her vote, and leave.):

Saturday, April 29, 2017
11:00 am – 2:00pm
Edward W. Wyatt Middle School
206 Slagles Lake Rd. Emporia, VA  23847

5. Candidate Requirements. Each candidate for nomination must meet all applicable requirements of state law, the Party Plan, and the Caucus Rules. Each candidate for Nomination must submit a completed Declaration of Candidacy form to the Chair of the Committee no later than April 13, 2017 at 5 p.m. ET. Each form must bear the original signature of the candidate, and must be accompanied by a filing fee of $1,500.00 made payable to the Brunswick County Democratic Committee. If only one qualified candidate files by the deadline, that person will be the nominee of the Democratic Party and the Caucus will be cancelled.

For questions about the Caucus, to request any accommodation necessary to ensure full participation, or to file a Declaration of Candidacy, please contact Kyle Williamson, Chair of the 75th House District Democratic Nominating Committee, any time at drkylewilliamson@yahoo.com or (434) 532-2672

Authorized by the 75th House Democratic Nominating Committee and

Paid for by the Brunswick County Democratic Committee

Tags: 

Job Fair Returning to SOUTHSIDE VIRGINIA EDUCATION CENTER

Job Fair is returning to Southside Virginia Education Center on Thursday, April 27, 2017.  The event is sponsored by Southside Virginia Community College, Crater Regional Workforce and Lakes Media:  WPTM 102.3, WWDW 107.7, WTRG 97.9, WSMY 14000 “All Sports” 995 JAMS, WDLZ 98.3 

The event is free and open to the public and will be held at SVEC at 1300 Greensville Country Circle, Emporia, VA from 2 to 4:30 p.m.  Those with proof of WorkKeys CRC can gain entrance at 1:45 p.m.  Be sure to dress to impress, bring copies of your resume, a photo ID and copy of WorkKeys Career Readiness Certificate (CRC). 

Job Fair Prep workshops will be held prior to the event at the Center.  These are:  Resume Writing, Job Search/Applying for Jobs on April 11 from 1 to 4 p.m.; Interview Skills on April 19 from 1 to 4 p.m. and Soft Skills on April 20from 1 to 4 p.m.  Pre-registration is required at htts:/southside.augusoft.net

For employers interested in registering, contact Angela McClintock at angela.mcclintock@southside.edu or 434-949-1026

Farmville District United Methodist Women Support Jackson-Feild

Members of the Farmville District United Methodist Women; Jackson-Feild is the FDUMW 2017 mission recipient.

Each year at the Farmville District United Methodist Women’s annual prayer breakfast, a mission recipient is selected.  Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services (JFBHS) was thrilled to be chosen as the 2017 recipient.

JFBHS Vice President Tod Balsbaugh spoke to the 171 women present about Jackson-Feild and its programs, services and needs. Members were asked to bring games, arts & craft supplies, knitted items, sports equipment and school supplies. One member’s husband built two corn hole boards for which she made the bean bags.  Additionally, an offering was collected with the funds going to Jackson-Feild.

After the meeting held in South Hill, a number of attendees approached Balsbaugh with offers to help in the future.

JFBHS thanks the members of the Farmville District United Methodist Women for all they’ve done to help the children.

Community Easter Drama To Be Performed At Main Street Baptist Church

Main Street Baptist Church located at 440 South Main Street, Emporia, VA will be presenting a Community Easter Drama entitled “No Greater Love” on April 6, 7, and 8 at 8:00 p.m. The doors will open at 7:30 p.m. FREE tickets are available at the church office on Monday, Wednesday and Thursdays from 10:00 to 2:00. Tickets are also available by calling 434-535-7268. Tickets requested by calling will be held before each performance at the Will Call Desk. Large group attendees requesting tickets are asked to call the above number so that seating arrangements can be made prior to performance.

The Easter Production Committee notes that it takes many people to put on a production of this size. Main Street Baptist Church, Main Street United Methodist Church, Independence United Methodist Church, Franklin Christian Church, Roanoke Rapids Christian Fellowship and First Christian Church of Emporia have lent their support to this drama. “From actors, to costumes, to sets and behind the scenes, it truly takes a community to get it all done,” say the production committee members. This year’s drama includes 30 actors ranging in age from 8 to 87, many playing multiple roles. Mr. Kevin Barnes, a member of Main Street Baptist Church, will play the role of Jesus Christ. Mr. Tom Spivey will be returning as the Narrator.

To further expand on the life and death of Jesus Christ Our Lord and Savior during this Easter Season, the dramatic presentation will feature seven new scenes. Those scenes include: Gabriel Visiting Mary, Jesus Calling His Disciples Into Service, Jesus and The Woman at the Well, Miracles Performed, a Conversation Between Pilate and His Wife and Jesus Speaking to His Disciples Before Ascending Into Heaven. The Easter Story would not be complete without focusing on these biblical events.

 The Main Street Baptist Church Easter Drama Committee encourages everyone to come experience and reflect on the true meaning of Easter.

Panther Prep Advising Day Returns to SVCC

Panther Prep Day is coming back to Southside Virgnia Community College.  Everyone is invited to a huge event happening at five locations of the college on Thursday, April 6, 2017.   Panther Prep Advising Day will be held from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. for all current students, those interested in becoming a student or learning more about the college.  The general public is welcome and encouraged to attend.

The event is being held at the Christanna Campus, Alberta, John H. Daniel Campus, Keysville, Southern Virginia Higher Education Center, South Boston, Southside Virginia Education Center in Emporia and Lake Country Advanced Knowledge Center, South Hill.

SVCC will show its Panther Pride on this day with fun, food, door prizes, help with registering for Fall and Summer classes, applying for financial aid and advisors getting students on the right path to success.  There will also be information about the college, entertainment, and college tours.

RSVP to http://www.southside.edu/pantherprepor call Leslie Perkins at 434 736 2022.

Virginia Housing Development Authority Homeownership Workshop Offered in Emporia

VHDA’s Home Ownership Education Workshop will be offered Monday, April 10th and Tuesday, April 11th from 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. at the Greensville/Emporia Extension Office located at 105 Oak Street, Emporia. Participants must attend both sessions in order to receive a certificate of completion.

The workshop is free and being coordinated by Virginia Cooperative Extension’s Greensville/Emporia Office and the Emporia- Greensville Financial Literacy Coalition. It is aimed at first-time homebuyers who are financially ready to become homeowners. The workshop covers the educational requirement for a VHDA mortgage and it may also count as first-time home buyer education for other loan programs.

Topics to be covered in this six-hour workshop include: Personal Finances, Credit and Credit Issues, Working with a Realtor, Role of the Lender, Loan Closing and the Home Inspection. Space is limited and registration is required. Please contact the Greensville/Emporia Extension Office at 434-348-4233 by Monday, April 3rd to register. You may also register online at www.vhda.com. A minimum of 5 participants must be registered for class to be conducted.

If you are a person with a disability and require assistance or accommodation to participate in this program, please call the Greensville/Emporia Extension Office at 434-348-4233 between the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. at least five days prior to this event. TDD number is 800-828-1120.

Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. An equal opportunity/affirmative action employer.

HALIFAX STREET (ROUTE 610) BRIDGE REPLACEMENT PROJECT BEGINS

Construction underway

EMPORIA– A project to demolish, remove and replace the existing Halifax Street Bridge on Route 610 is under construction. Contract crews for the Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) will demolish then replace the bridge and rebuild the approach roadway to tie into the new bridge. The new bridge will be 36 feet long and 32 feet wide. All construction work is dependent upon weather conditions. 

Halifax Street (Route 610/3807) is closed to thru traffic in both the northbound and southbound directions. Motorists are advised to follow the signed detours in place. 

S.T. Wooten Corporation was awarded the $660,000 contract for the new bridge replacement on November 8, 2016. The project will continue over the next 5 months, with completion scheduled for June 2017.

Businesses and homeowners will always have access at all times. To learn more, please visit http://www.virginiadot.org/projects/hamptonroads/halifax_st_bridge.asp.

Motorists are encouraged to visit www.va511.org, call 511, listen to Highway Advisory Radio (HAR) 1680 AM or call the Traffic Information Line at 757-361-3016 for current traffic and travel information. 

Library wants Yearbooks

The Meherrin Regional Library System is seeking donations of local school yearbooks to include in a yearbook digitization project. Working with the Library of Virginia, MRLS is looking to the public to donate yearbooks especially from the years 1977 and before. Local public and private schools of Brunswick and Greensville counties may be included in the project. Donations are needed before October 26th and may be dropped off at the Brunswick County Library, Lawrenceville or the Richardson Memorial Library, Emporia. The books will be used for digitization and then added to the library’s permanent reference collection. For more information or questions call 434-848-2418 ext. 301 or 434-634-2539.

VDOT URGES MOTORISTS TO OBEY ROUTE 301 BRIDGE TRAFFIC AND DETOUR SIGNS

Virginia State Police to begin enforcement for reckless driving.

GREENSVILLE COUNTY – Safety is the biggest priority for the Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT), and the Hampton Roads District is urging motorists to obey all traffic and detour signs posted around the Route 301 Southbound Bridge Replacement Project in Greensville County.  Recently, drivers have been observed traveling the wrong way over the Route 301 Northbound Bridge to avoid the construction detour, resulting in several near-collisions.

Beginning today, January 4, 2016, Virginia State Police will step up enforcement near the bridge and issue reckless driving citations to motorists exhibiting dangerous driving patterns.  Drivers traveling southbound will use I-95 as the detour around the bridge closure.

The Route 301 Bridge Replacement Project is currently on schedule for completion in summer 2017.  The old bridge has been demolished, and crews are currently working on building the new bridge approaches.   For more information, please visit VDOT’s project website:

http://www.virginiadot.org/projects/hamptonroads/rte_301_bridge.asp

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