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Seven Day Forecast for Emporia, Virginia
 

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Saturday September  21,2019 8am to 1pm

Come to the intersection of 58 and Purdy Rd turn at Sadler Truck Stop and follow  signs. Lots of stuff to sell must go this week! Lawn and garden household items, some Antique Furniture, small refrigerator and Treadmill

Meherrin Regional Library System is seeking a Public Services Librarian for the W. E. Richardson, Jr. Memorial Library, Emporia, VA. For details visit the Employment page at www.meherrinlib.org.

Don't let Emporia News Shut Down...

There is a real danger that Emporia News will come to an end in the near future. I need the support of the community to continue this operation. I am not, at least in my mind asking for a lot. I just want some content and enough sponsors and donations to be able to continue to provide this site to the community without worring about how I am going to pay basic expensenses like internet access, mobile phone access (which is the backup for the internet), backup hosting, custom email and the many other things that go into bringing this site to you.

Please keep the content coming. Send anything that you want your neighbors to know: Wedding, Engagement and Birth Announcements; School Announcements; Retirement Announcements; etc. This is the first summer that I have skipped fresh pages during the week for lack of content. I generally will take Friday and Saturday evenings off, unless an obituary or other inportant story comes in, but have never taken off during the week before this summer, except after the first hernia surgery.

PBS is in the middle of another Fund Drive, which led me to think of a conversation I had with one of my readers a few weeks ago. She asked me how I made a living since all she ever saw me do was Community Service (we were talking about the Summer feeding program that my Church participated in for the third summer in a row). I related to her that like PBS I depended on donations and Coporatate Sponsorships. She got a real hoot out of the thought that, as she put it, "little 'ole Emporia had a public broadcasting outlet."<

This reader was impressed with all that I did with this site, but mainly, like several others, liked the fact that the Obituaries were published promptly (although she felt that it was a bit morbid wanting timely Obituaries). Whether you read for timely Obituaries, which is not morbid, or you like the VCU Capitol News Service, or just like to wake up to some light community news with your coffee, this site is there for you every day that there is fresh content for me to publish.

I envision Emporia News as the story of our Community. And, yes, Obituaries are a part of that stroy. I would also like to see birth announcements, engagement announcements and wedding announcements. If you have a child or grandchild graduate from college or get into a difficult-to-get-into college or Service Academy, send me that information, too. Our community is rich in stories, and Emporia News reaches the world. While funding is important to keeping this site up and running, so is content.

Speaking of funding, if all of the regular readers of Emporia News were do donate as little as $10, this message would only be on the page for a short time. I have to admit that it pains me to ask, and I have done my best to avoid it. I am currently posting on a borrowed laptop as the last one I purchased for the site has already bitten the dust and needs to be replaced.

If your are regular customers at any local businesses that you feel would benefit from sponsoring or advertising on Emporia News, the rates for both are very affordable, encorage them to contact me at news@emporianews.com.

If every reader of Empria News donated as little as $10, this "Fund Drive" Message would not be here for long. If you feel so led, you may make a donation of any amount. You may also make a recurring donation with a subscription.

If you would like to contribute content or let me know that an event needs coverage, email me at news@emporianews.com.

Thank You

Jay Osburn, Editor/Publisher - EmporiaNews.com

P.S - Checking Obituaries is not morbid - you never know when someone who touched your life, but that you may not have known well enough to get a phone call about, may have passed...

Population Is Expected to Shrink in Rural Virginia

By Emma North, Capital News Service

RICHMOND — “More and more people are relocating to Highland County, Virginia, everyday!” the county’s website says.

Online, local officials offer resources and encouragement for people to relocate to Highland County, the most sparsely populated in Virginia. A brochure urges readers to consider Highland’s “elevated lifestyle.”

But Highland County faces an uphill battle in attracting new residents. Demographers at the University of Virginia predict that the county’s population, now about 2,260, will drop 17% over the next two decades.

Of the state’s 133 cities and counties, U.Va.’s Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service projects that 53 will lose population by 2040. Most of those shrinking localities are in south, southwest and western Virginia.

“These areas are losing population every time the population is counted,” said Augie Wallmeyer, author of the book “Extremes of Virginia.”

“With a few minor exceptions, they just don’t have what it takes to retain people or attract new people.”

Many of the localities projected to lose population offer tranquility, clean air and beautiful views, but they lack job opportunities. Some also lack high-speed internet access that businesses need.

Wallmeyer said rural areas may lack sufficient health care and educational opportunities as well.

The state has implemented programs such as GO Virginia to encourage the growth of high-paying jobs throughout the commonwealth. Community colleges also are offering more job training programs. But Wallmeyer said there has been a lack of coordination among efforts to address problems in rural counties.

“Without coordination, you may find, for example, that GO Virginia might find a way to attract jobs to a county. But if the educational opportunities are very limited or if there is no good health care nearby or a terrible drug abuse problem or no amenities like Starbucks and that sort of thing, the effort fails,” Wallmeyer said.

The available workforce in rural counties becomes even smaller after factoring in age.

In an analysis of the data, Shonel Sen, a research and policy analyst for the Weldon Cooper Center’s Demographics Research Group, said that by next year, more than 30% of the residents in rural counties like Highland are expected to be over 65. That is double the statewide proportion of people over 65.

By 2040, people over 65 would make up more than 35% of the population of Highland and Lancaster counties, according to the center’s projections.

Having so many residents at retirement age subtracts from the available workforce. An aging population also creates a greater demand for health care, which many rural areas are struggling to provide.

The population trends affect not just the economy but also politics, Wallmeyer said. As rural counties shrink, so does their legislative representation. This makes it difficult to make their issues a priority at the state level.

“It bodes ill for people in those areas who think the political system can fix their problems,” Wallmeyer said.

The Demographics Research Group predicts that while parts of Virginia face drastic population losses, other parts will grapple with dramatic population gains. Overall, the state population will grow 14%, to almost 10 million, by 2040, the projections show.

Sen pointed out the “significant rural-urban divide” in Virginia. She noted that currently, 70% of the state’s residents live in the three largest metropolitan areas (Northern Virginia, Hampton Roads and the Richmond area) and only 12% live in non-metro areas.

By 2040, the demographers predict, Loudoun County would grow 55%, to almost 670,000 residents — adding the equivalent of the current population of Richmond. Loudoun would rise from being the state’s fourth most populous locality to the second, behind only Fairfax County.

The data also project high growth in other localities in Northern Virginia (such as Prince William and Stafford counties) and between Richmond and Williamsburg (New Kent and James City counties).

At the same time, the number of residents likely will decrease in rural areas. For instance, the center predicts that Buchanan County will lose almost a third of its population, going from more than 21,000 residents to about 14,500. The group’s data suggest that the populations of Danville and Martinsville, as well as Accomack and Grayson counties, will decline by more than one-fifth.

William T. “Bill” Bradley Jr.

November 12, 1947-September 19, 1947

Graveside Services

11 a.m. Saturday, September 21

Greensville Memorial Cemetery
1250 Skippers Road
Emporia, Virginia 23847

William T. “Bill” Bradley, Jr., 71, passed away Thursday, September 19,2019. He was preceded in death by his former wife and life partner, Elisabet “Lisa” Bradley.

Mr. Bradley is survived by his daughter, Linda B. Watkins and husband, David; three grandchildren, Brian K. Sexton, Jr. of Duluth, Minnesota, Travis Watkins and Krista Watkins.

A graveside funeral service will be held 11 a.m. Saturday, September 21 at Greensville Memorial Cemetery.

The family will receive friends at his daughter’s home.

Online condolences may be shared with the family at www.owenfh.com.

September Update From Congressman McEachin

This summer, we were happy to host a “Mobile McEachin” in Emporia. This is where a staffer travels to the locality to provide easier and more efficient service for constituents. We were excited to meet folks from Emporia and be able to offer help. Until we are there again, if you need assistance with a federal agency, please contact my office at mceachin.house.gov.  We are also happy to hear your opinions on issues of the day.

On September 28th, from 10 am to noon at Capital One, West Creek Commons, 15000 Capital One Drive, Richmond, 23238, I will be hosting, with Congresswoman Spanberger a Service Academy Day for students interested in attending one of the five service academies – US Coast Guard Academy, US Air Force Academy, US Merchant Marine Academy, US Naval Academy at Annapolis and US Military Academy at West Point. This is a great opportunity to learn about the academies and the application process. Our academies train leaders of the next generation.

Unfortunately, I had to cancel my August town hall in Emporia because of dangerous threatening weather. I was very disappointed not to have the chance to dialogue with folks, but safety is paramount. I plan to be back soon.

-Congressman A. Donald McEachin represents Virginia’s 4th Congressional District

Voter Registration Is Up More in Democratic Strongholds

By Kelly Booth, Capital News Service

RICHMOND — Over the past four years, voter registration has grown faster in Virginia localities that tend to vote Democratic than in localities that usually go Republican. That could spell trouble for the GOP heading into November’s elections.

Between August 2015 and August 2019, voter registration increased 9% in the state’s Democratic strongholds but only 6% in Republican strongholds, according to an analysis of data from the Virginia Department of Elections.

Democratic Party officials say they are pleased about the trend in a year when Virginians are electing state legislators but not a governor or U.S. senator.

“We always say slower turnout with Virginia’s off-year election and fully recognize that this is an off-off year election with no statewide race,” said Kathryn Gilley, communications director for the House Democratic Caucus. “That being said, the fact that there is so much new voter registration ... Virginians are really aware of the importance of this year.”

But Jeff Ryer, press secretary for the Virginia Senate Republican Caucus, said an increase in registered voters in Democratic areas doesn’t necessarily mean Democrats will win at the polls. He said something similar happened in Florida in 2016 and 2018, with news stories and opinion surveys predicting victories for Democrats.

“Not only did they (Democrats) not prevail, but they lost both,” Ryer said. “One of the things I really like to point out to people is Republicans do much better at the polls than in the polls.”

Gilley said Democrats are still energized from the 2016 presidential election, in which Hillary Clinton carried Virginia but lost in the Electoral College to Donald Trump.

“Trump’s election has really highlighted the importance of state legislatures,” Gilley said.

Pro-Trump vs. Pro-Clinton localities

Statewide in 2016, 50% of Virginia voters cast their ballots for Clinton and 44% for Trump. (The remaining votes went to the Libertarian and other minor-party candidates.)

Trump carried 93 cities and counties in Virginia, mostly in the less populated southern and western parts of the state where population has been flat or declining. Clinton carried 40 localities, largely in Northern Virginia, the Richmond area and Hampton Roads — areas that are more densely populated and generally are growing in population.

Last week, the Virginia Department of Elections posted data on how many people were registered to vote in each locality as of August. Capital News Service compared those numbers with the corresponding data for August 2015, when Virginia was preparing for a similar election in which only legislative and local offices were up for grabs.

During the four-year period, voter registration increased 6.4%, to 2.68 million, in the 93 localities that voted for Trump. But the number of voters jumped 8.6%, to 2.91 million, in the 40 localities that backed Clinton.

The difference was even bigger in the communities that went heavily for one candidate or another:

·         Seventy-six localities cast at least 55% of their votes for Trump. In those cities and counties combined, voter registration went up 5.8% over the past four years.

·         Thirty localities cast at least 55% of their votes for Clinton. Taken as a whole, those areas have seen an 8.7% jump in registered voters since 2015.

For example, voter registration is up 16% in Richmond and 11% in Alexandria — cities that cast at least three-fourths of their votes for Clinton.

In contrast, voter registration declined slightly in most of the localities that cast at least three-fourths of their votes for Trump. For instance, the number of registered voters is down 5% in Buchanan County and 7% in Dickenson County.

Not every locality reflected the trend. Voter registration increased 15% or more in the Republican strongholds of New Kent, Louisa and Goochland counties, and it dropped in Greensville County and the cities of Williamsburg and Franklin, which tend to vote for Democrats.

 

But overall, the number of registered voters went up more in Democratic localities than Republican ones.

Will redrawn districts help Democrats?

Stephen Farnsworth, director of the Center for Leadership and Media Studies at the University of Mary Washington, noted that voter registration increased after 11 Virginia House districts were redrawn this year. That happened after the courts found that the districts had been racially gerrymandered. The redrawn districts generally are more favorable to Democrats.

“When lines are drawn more favorably for one party or the other, that increases the quality of the candidates who are willing to run, increases the amount of money that donors are willing to spend, and those two things can increase voter interest,” said Farnsworth, a professor of political science and international affairs.

“Expect higher turnout in some of those newly drawn districts because they’re more competitive than they used to be.”

All seats in the General Assembly are up for election on Nov. 5. Currently, Republicans hold a 21-19 majority in the Virginia Senate and a 51-49 edge in the House of Delegates.

Ryer noted that the Senate has had the same districts drawn by the Democrats since 2011.

“The Senate is operating under a Democratic gerrymander,” Ryer said. “Yet, despite the fact that the Democrats drew the lines, Republicans have been in the majority since those lines went into effect.”

Democrats are hoping to flip both chambers so that they control not only state government’s executive branch, with Ralph Northam’s election as governor in 2017, but also the legislative branch.

“If Democrats can pick up a few seats in either chamber, the legislature will shift. And if they pick up a couple of seats in both chambers, then Democrats will control the governor’s office as well as both chambers of the legislature — and we haven’t seen that in Virginia in 20 years,” Farnsworth said.

With control of the General Assembly at stake, Virginia’s legislative elections have attracted national attention.

“People really look to Virginia as an indicator for how the rest of the nation will vote, especially since we have become a purple (state) trending blue,” Gilley said.

“A lot of campaign operations and different groups almost use Virginia as like a test area for different tactics and strategies … National groups look at Virginia because we’ve got off-year elections, so they’ll implement strategies here to see if they want to use them in the regular-year election.”

Gilley said voters also were motivated by how close some elections have been in Virginia. In 2017, the race between Republican incumbent David Yancey and Democratic challenger Shelly Simonds in the 94th House District in Newport News ended in a tie. The election was decided by a lottery: Yancey’s name was pulled from a bowl, allowing Republicans to maintain control of the House.

Gilley said that election “really highlighted how important every single vote is.”

Episcopal Churches Help Jackson-Feild’s Children

Members of St. John’s Episcopal Church in Hopewell and Martin’s Brandon in Disputanta recently participated in a combined effort to collect items for the youth at Jackson-Feild.

Carol Hopkins of St. John’s coordinated the project that resulted in a donation of 163 items ranging from school supplies to bikes, sporting goods, board games, puzzles, and art supplies. Hopkins and her husband, Ed, delivered the items to the Jackson-Feild campus where they were enthusiastically welcomed with open arms by residents and staff alike, and were immediately pressed into service.

Since 1855, churches, individuals, and businesses have provided hope and help for more than 15,000 children by providing cash donations and in-kind gifts.

Perhaps you or your group would like to conduct a donation drive!  Please visit www.jacksonfeild.org and click on the “Ways to Give” tab.  You will find the current Wish List posted there.  For more information, you may also contact Tod Balsbaugh at 804-354-6929 or tbalsbaugh@jacksonfeild.org.

The staff and residents at Jackson-Feild gratefully thank the members of St. John’s and Martin’s Brandon for their kindness and generosity.

 

 

 

WARNER RAISES QUESTIONS ABOUT CYBERSECURITY PRACTICES AMID BREACHES INVOLVING SENSITIVE BIOMETRIC DATA

~ Requests answers from U.S. Customs and Border Protection and Suprema HQ Inc. ~

 

WASHINGTON – Today, U.S. Sen. Mark R. Warner (D-VA), Vice Chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee and former tech entrepreneur, wrote to U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and South Korean company Suprema HQ, following separate but alarming incidents that impacted both entities and exposed Americans’ personal, permanently identifiable data. In a letter to CBP, Sen. Warner inquired about the information security practices of CBP contractors, in light of a June cyberattack that resulted in the theft of tens of thousands of facial images belonging to U.S. travelers. In a separate letter, Sen. Warner requested more information from Suprema HQ, the company that owns web-based biometric lock system, Biostar 2, which experienced a cyber incident in August, resulting in the exposure of permanently identifiable biometric data belonging to at least one million people worldwide.
 
“While all of the stolen information was sensitive and required protection, facial image data is especially sensitive, since such permanent personal information cannot be replaced like a password or a license plate number,” wrote Sen. Warner to Acting CBP Commissioner Mark Morgan.  “It is absolutely critical that federal agencies and industry improve their track records, especially when handling and processing biometric data. Americans deserve to have their sensitive information secured, regardless of whether it is being handled by a first or a third-party.”
 
In June, CBP announced the theft of at least 100,000 traveler ID photos from a CBP subcontractor that had improperly transferred copies of these photos from CBP servers to its own company database. In addition to facial images, the cyberattack resulted in the theft of several gigabytes of data, including license plate photos, confidential agreements, hardware blueprints for security systems, and budget spreadsheets.
 
In the letter to CBP, Sen. Warner expressed alarm regarding the failure of federal agencies to ensure that Americans’ sensitive information is safe in the hands of contractors. He also asked CBP to provide timely answers to a series of questions regarding the information security practices of CBP contractors and subcontractors. Among these questions, Sen. Warner requested details on CBP’s third-party contractual requirements concerning database encryption, biometric data management, vulnerability management, logging data retention, and identity and access management, among other security measures.
 
Similarly, in his letter to Suprema HQ, Sen. Warner raised concerns about the Biostar 2 incident, which exposed permanently identifiable biometric data, including user photos.
 
“Unlike passwords, email addresses and phone numbers, biometric information in voices, fingerprints, and eyes are unique data that are impossible to reset. Biometric data can be used effectively for unauthorized surveillance and access to secure facilities, to steal identities, and is even valuable in developing deepfake technologies,” wrote Sen. Warner to Suprema HQ CEO James Lee. “It is my understanding that your customers use your biometric security system to provide access to secure facilities, and that the product has also been integrated into Nedap’s AEOS access control systems, which are used by at least 5,700 organizations in 83 countries, including banks and foreign law enforcement entities.  Given the sensitivity of this information, it is absolutely critical that companies like yours exercise exceptional due care when collecting and securing biometric information, and when contracting with customers that collect permanent personal information.”
 
The Biostar 2 breach resulted in the online exposure of more than one million fingerprint records, in addition to user images, personal details, usernames and passwords, and employee security clearances. The breach also revealed that large portions of the Biostar 2 database were unprotected and unencrypted. In the letter, Sen. Warner asked Suprema HQ to list which U.S. businesses are served by the company. He also requested more information on the company’s practices regarding server security, biometric data storage security, and database encryption.
 
Sen. Warner has been a champion for cybersecurity throughout his career, and has been an outspoken critic of poor cybersecurity practices that compromise Americans’ personal information. In May, Sen. Warner introduced bold legislation to hold credit reporting agencies accountable for data breaches. He also introduced legislation earlier this year to empower state and local government to counter cyberattacks, and to increase cybersecurity among public companies.

Toni Morrison documentary screens at ICA

Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am post-screening discussion Film Curator Enjoli Moon and Poet Nikki Giovanni lead discussion

By Aliviah Jones, Capital News Service

RICHMOND – Poet, scholar and activist Nikki Giovanni feels the loss everyday of her best friend Toni Morrison.

Giovanni stood on stage at the Institute for Contemporary Art at Virginia Commonwealth University Wednesday and candidly told the audience how her friendship began with Nobel Prize winning author Toni Morrison, who died in early August at age 88.

“I picked up “The Bluest Eye” and I read it and I thought ‘Oh my God this is brilliant, I have to meet this woman,’” Giovanni said.

Then she did what most people don’t do when they finish an inspiring book. Giovanni walked across New York from her apartment ato Random House where Morrison was working. After Giovanni patiently waited, Morrison agreed to meet with her. They had a cup of coffee across the street, beginning a 40-year long friendship.

Giovanni led a post-discussion of the documentary “Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am” that screened to a packed auditorium in the ICA.

The film detailed what the black experience was like for Morrison as she journeyed through her upbringing in Lorain, Ohio, education at Howard University and then Cornell University, on to a critically-lauded literary career authoring 11 novels. Morrison was the first African American female editor at Penguin Random House and the first African American woman to win the Nobel Prize in literature, in 1993. 

The film peered into Morrison’s life through first-hand interviews with Morrison and other notable literary figures such as Hilton Als, Fran Lebowitz and Sonia Sanchez.

ICA film curator Enjoli Moon, who also founded the Afrikana Film Festival taking place in Richmond this weekend, said the museum was already interested in screening the film. When Morrison died in August, hosting the event transitioned into an honor. 

“I’m excited to be able to present this film, something that I think will help to elevate her legacy,” said Moon.

The two-hour documentary directed by Timothy Greenfield-Sanders was released in June.
The theme of sisterhood weaves throughout the film, highlighting moments shared between Morrison and Oprah Winfrey and with civil rights activist Angela Davis. Morrison convinced Davis to write an autobiography shortly after she was found not guilty of murder. 

Giovanni misses the sisterhood; she misses long talks on the phone with Morrison.

She said Morrison’s success will live on through her literature, and hopes that one day Morrison’s life is made into a biopic.

 “Reading Toni Morrison is like reading the New Testament over and over,” Giovanni said. “You start to look at everything very, very differently.” 

Morrison’s commentary in the film elicited laughter and tears from the audience. She discussed her experience working in an industry dominated by white men. She also said she was critized for writing about slavery and being African American. 

The film kicked off the second season of ICA Cinema, which screens films by independent filmmakers at 7 p.m. on the second Wednesday of the month.

“Some Warm Thoughts”

With the temperature being very hot
And the humidity extra high
To find some pleasant entertainment
One really has to try.
 
Now every day is an adventure
So I turn to center stage
I try and do all the things I can
For people of my age.
 
I fixed breakfast on the sidewalk
With my tow eggs over light
Then I fried the strips of bacon
Until it was crispy to the bite.
 
Well the eggs ended they ended up scrambled
When I  tried to make them flip
I shoud have first fixed up the bacon
So the grease would have made them slide.
 
The likes are not impossible
With the heat we’ve had of late
Yet the city didn’t appreciate
The mess I did create.
 
Yes this venture was a wipeout
Outside cooking on my knees
Yet if the temperature continues to rise
I’ll be trying a grilled cheese!
 
                         - Roy E. Schepp

Virginia Legal Aid Society Creates New Project to Combat Domestic Violence

Virginia Legal Aid Society has created a six-person Domestic Violence Project dedicated to meeting the civil legal needs of domestic violence victims in Central, Southside and Western Tidewater Virginia.

“In our last strategic planning process in 2017, we learned that domestic violence is especially common in the 26 cities and counties that we serve in Central, Southside and Western Tidewater, Virginia. These cities and counties issue 47% more protective orders than the statewide average by population” said David Neumeyer, Executive Director of VLAS. “Victims particularly need an attorney when asking for a permanent protective order because abusers who control the family money often show up with an attorney, and victims cannot afford one. We have been working for the last eighteen months to create this unit, and are excited that we now have the team in place.

”VLAS expects to help more than 1,300 domestic violence victims and their family members with the help of a two-year grant from the Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services. VLAS staff will help many of these victims obtain permanent protective orders against their abusers. The project also covers a full range of civil legal services, as long as the client is a domestic violence victim. Victims who need help, for example, obtaining a divorce, defending themselves in an eviction proceeding, receiving government benefits for which they are entitled or many other services can receive help.

VLAS’s Domestic Violence Project team consists of six positions, four of which are new. They include four attorneys, one in each of VLAS’s four offices; a Community Outreach Coordinator; and a paralegal. The attorneys and their offices are:

  • Pamela DeCamp, Managing Attorney for the Domestic Violence Project and also Managing Attorney of VLAS’s Farmville office.
  • Lindsay Horne (Lynchburg)
  • Dana Sanford (Suffolk)
  • Michael Simmons (Danville)

Mary Buchanan is the project’s Community Outreach Coordinator. In that role, she will work with VLAS’s partners to encourage client referrals and also help educate the public directly through public presentations and informational brochures and videos. Susan Crawley, the new paralegal, will work with domestic violence victims and assist project attorneys.

“We are grateful to DCJS for its confidence in this effort. The grant will allow VLAS to play a pivotal role in helping hundreds of victims receive protection from their abusers and work toward rebuilding their lives” said DeCamp said.

Over the past year, VLAS signed agreements with 18 agencies that work with domestic violence victims. VLAS will accept client referrals from these partners, build relationships with new partners, and help domestic violence clients who apply directly through VLAS’s LawLine (1-866-LEGLAID, or 1-866-534-5243).

Spotlight on Jobs by the Virginia Employment Commission

Job Fair for Waverly Health & Rehabilitation on September 17, 2019 from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at Virginia Employment Commission, 1300 Greensville County Circle, Suite C, Room 105, Emporia, VA 23847

Certified Nursing Assistant:  Will assist residents with ADLs including baths, dressing, and meals. Perform patient assessments. Assist nurses with vital signs, weights, and measurements. Provides nail care and daily grooming. Properly document daily activities and restorative functions.   Job Order #1740049

Licensed Practical Nurse:  Will administer medications according to physician orders. Perform patient assessments. Directs CNAs and other staff to complete daily ADLs, vital signs, baths, and other assignments. Perform wound care, dressing changes, and skin assessments. Properly document daily activities, physician orders, changes, and other administrative duties. Collaborate with physicians for best course of treatment for residents with change of condition.  Job Order #1740062

Information Technology Technician: Performs responsible skilled work performing a variety of computer and information technology tasks: does related work as required. Requires the exertion of up to 10 pounds of force occasionally and negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to move objects; work requires reaching, fingering, grasping, and repetitive motions: vocal communication is required for expressing or exchanging ideas by means of the spoken word; hearing is required to perceive information at normal spoken work levels, etc.  Job Order #1757853

Commercial Service Tire Technician:  Repair and replace tires. Move or lift heavy objects. Adhere to safety procedures. Use knowledge of metric system. Use oral or written communication techniques. Fabricate, assemble, or disassemble manufactured products by hand, etc.  Job Order #1743629

Sr. Secondary Math Teacher:  Organize class and instruct secondary grade students in upper-level Mathematics subjects with seniority. Assess students’ needs and provide appropriate academic instruction. Establish and enforce educational rules and procedures to maintain order in the classroom for optimum results. Plan and conduct academic activities for a balanced program of instruction, demonstration, and work time. Observe and evaluate students’ progress. Assist in the curriculum and instructional development by compilation and report of various educational data, such as test results, students feed-back, and collaboration experiences with colleague teachers. Participate in professional and educational meetings to continue developing the instructional method.  Job Order #1744583

THESE AND ALL JOBS WITH THE VIRGINIA EMPLOYMENT COMMISSION CAN BE FOUND ONLINE AT

www.vawc.virginia.gov

The Virginia Employment Commission is An Equal Opportunity Employer/Program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities.

La Comision de Empleo de Virginia es un empleador/programa con igualdad de portunidades.  Los auxiliaries y servicios estan disponibles a dedido para personas con discapacidades

How About A Pawpaw?

Pawpaw fruit is often called the “Poor Man’s Banana” because its taste is a cross between a banana and a mango with a hint of pineapple.

A little-known fruit with amazing flavor

Perhaps you’ve never heard of a pawpaw, let alone eaten one. But the sweet, creamy tropical fruit was once a common staple for Native Americans and colonial settlers in the Commonwealth—and a rumored favorite for two former United States presidents.

Both George Washington and Thomas Jefferson are said to have been passionate about pawpaws, which they planted and cultivated at Mount Vernon and Monticello. The pawpaw is the largest edible fruit native to North America. It was first documented in 1540 by a Portuguese explorer on an expedition to the New World who noticed Native Americans eating the fruit.

Pawpaw looks similar to a mango, and its flesh has a custardy texture that is not only sweet and delicious to eat as is, but also is a common ingredient in mouth-watering jams, jellies, pies, tarts, smoothies and ice cream. No wonder Washington and Jefferson are said to have enjoyed a good pawpaw in their day.

Despite its popularity then, pawpaw somehow became a fruit of the past, but not anymore. The once-obscure plant is growing in popularity again. Pawpaw grows in approximately 26 states, mainly in the eastern region of the country, and it is believed to have been spread throughout the region by Native American tribes. Even today, pawpaw can still be found at Mount Vernon and Monticello.

If you’re interested in learning more about pawpaws, growing them or just sampling the juicy delicacy that tastes like a cross between a banana and mango with a hint of pineapple, then you won’t want to miss the Pawpaw Production and Marketing Workshop on Sept. 6 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Virginia State University’s Randolph Farm Pavilion at 4415 River Road, Petersburg, VA. Admission is $20. Pre-registration is required.

A limited number of exhibition spaces are available at the workshop on a first-come, first-served basis. The exhibition fee is $50 and includes two six-foot tables and two chairs. Table skirting and access to electricity will not be provided. One complimentary registration is provided per exhibit space. Exhibition setup will begin at 7 a.m.

To register for the workshop or to reserve exhibition space, visit http://www.ext.vsu.edu/pawpaw. Boxed lunches will be provided for participants and exhibitors.

The keynote speaker for the workshop is Neal Peterson, nationally-known pawpaw plant breeder, who will present on basic pawpaw production. Peterson will be joined by several farmers who will share their experiences growing and marketing pawpaw. Participants will also be able to sample locally grown varieties of pawpaw.

Pawpaw doesn’t just taste good, the fruit is also nutritious and high in vitamin C, magnesium, iron, copper, manganese and several essential amino acids. As an added bonus they also have significant amounts of riboflavin, niacin, calcium, phosphorus, and zinc, all of which contribute to a healthy body.

“Pawpaw was an important fruit during colonial times, and is now growing in popularity more for its taste and nutritional value,” said Dr. Reza Rafie, a horticulture professor and an Extension specialist for the Virginia Cooperative Extension at Virginia State University. “Pawpaw is easy to grow, and has good potential for local markets.”

If you have any questions about this event or are a person with a disability and desire any assistive devices, services or other accommodations to participate in this activity, please contact Mollie Klein at mklein@vsu.edu/804-524-5960/TDD (800) 828-1120 during business hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. to discuss accommodations five days prior to the event.

Extension is a joint program of Virginia Tech, Virginia State University, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and state and local governments. Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. An equal opportunity/ affirmative action employer. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. Edwin J. Jones, Director, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; M. Ray McKinnie, Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State University, Petersburg.

 
 
Pawpaw could be called a "wonderfruit" because it is high
in vitamin C, magnesium, iron, copper and manganese
and also is a good source of potassium and
several essential amino acids.

 

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SVCC’s Johnny Paws Is One of Many College Mascots

Fall is the time to meet the mascots at some of your favorite colleges such as  Mike the Tiger of Louisiana State, HokieBird of Virginia Tech, the Trojan of Virginia State, Smokey of the University of Tennessee, and of course, Johnny Paws of Southside Virginia Community College.  Paws was born on January 1, 2013, and named by a student who won a contest and in honor of then SVCC President John Cavan.  Since then, many have ‘played’ Johnny so here is the story of just one former SVCC mascot. 

Suppose you chose a college to explore careers and ended up becoming the college mascot, too.  This was the journey of Jared Hurak of Farmville, Virginia who reminds those starting college this fall to make friends and participate in the activities like he did at SVCC.

“Do not hesitate to be friendly with people!  Yes, we all go to college to get a degree, but if the opportunity presents itself, do not pass it up.  College is a social environment as well as professional one so make some friends,” he advises.

A self-described hyperactive person, Hurak  said with time between classes,  he volunteered to help Student Activities Coordinator Le’Tina Giles with events.  Hearing about a need for someone to don the Johnny Paws costume for Panther Prep Day,  Hurak and a friend filled out the paperwork with plans to share the responsibilities of being the big cat at the all-day event.  A week before the date, he learned his friend had not completed the paperwork and he would be the lone Panther.

“I had not planned to be Johnny Paws the entire day and internal panic ensued.  I proceeded and am glad I did,” he notes.

He remembers, “My first time as Johnny Paws I had no idea what I was doing. I had received some pointers from one of the people who had been Johnny Paws before me, but that did not help with how nervous the prospect of being in a mascot suit in front of strangers and friends alike made me. Looking back on it, I was overthinking things and was fretting over my social skills not being good enough to be a college mascot. Once I was actually in the mascot suit, I was not nervous anymore.”

He continued, “ It dawned on me that no matter how nervous I was, it would not show and certainly would not help me. Therefore, I proceeded to put some of the pointers I received into practice and was astonished at their effectiveness. I mostly greeted people, made exaggerated movements, and posed for pictures, but these simple things made so many people smile and laugh that it made me happy that I went through with it.”

The only downside of being the mascot is how hot the suit is in warmer weather, he noted.  Otherwise, being Johnny was a great experience. 

“SVCC helped me develop my communication skills immensely. Fresh out of high school, I was somewhat shy and always afraid to talk to new people;  yet, thanks to the faculty and my fellow students at SVCC I became far friendlier and more conversational than I ever have been,” said Hurak.

He also was a member of  the Gaming Club and participated in other activities.  He stresses to new and old students to make friends and spend time with them but finish your schoolwork first. 

Hurak does not see college mascot in his future.  He plans to continue his studies at a four-year university and hopes for a career along the lines of preventing wildlife extinction, especially among large mammals.  I guess that includes panthers!!

Your Ticket to Adventure – September Is Library Card Sign-Up Month

This September the Meherrin Regional Library is joining the American Library Association (ALA) and libraries nationwide for Library Card Sign-Up Month, a time to remind parents, caregivers, and students that a library card is the first step towards academic achievement and lifelong learning.

Since 1987, Library Card Sign-Up Month has been held each September to mark the beginning of the school year. Throughout the month, the ALA and libraries unite in a national effort to ensure that every child signs up for their own library card.

A library card opens a world of infinite possibilities through resources and services that give students the tools to succeed in school and beyond. Reading plays an important role in the education and development of children. Studies show that children who read at home and who use the library perform better in school and are more likely to continue to use the library as a source of lifetime learning.

Your local library offers free and fun educational resources and activities that bring families and communities together. For younger children, early literacy resources and interactive story times encourage school readiness. For students, teens, and adults, the library provides access to technology, digital resources, and entertainment materials.

This year, Disney and Pixar’s “Toy Story 4” characters are serving as Honorary Chairs of Library Card Sign-Up Month. Their mission is to promote the value of a library card and bring attention to the many ways libraries transform lives and communities. To celebrate, the Library will show the original “Toy Story” movie on Saturday, September 14th at 10:30 AM. Feel free to bring a snack and your favorite toy! The Library will also offer patrons the chance to enter a Book Bundle Giveaway when signing up for a card, renewing an expired card, replacing a lost card, or showing their card when they check out.

For more information on how to sign up for a library card, visit www.meherrinlib.org, stop by the Brunswick County Library in Lawrenceville or the Richardson Memorial Library in Emporia, or call 434-848-2418 (Brunswick) or 434-634-2539 (Emporia).

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