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Career Opportunity

Residential Counselors

(Youth Service Workers)

If you are interested in making a positive impact on the lives of Virginia’s youth, then we want you to become part of our Team!  Residential Treatment Facility located in Jarratt, Virginia seeks positive role models to work directly with adolescent boys and girls in a residential treatment program.  The Youth Service Worker is responsible for role-modeling healthy behavior and teaching life skills.  This is a full-time position.

Must possess the availability to work weekends, evenings, and holidays.  Flexibility is a must.  Seeking candidates with experience working in the department of corrections (adult or juvenile), or working with youth in the community or in a formal setting.   A Bachelors’ degree is preferred but NOT Required.  Starting pay ranges from $12.50 to $14.00/hr. depending upon experience and credentials.  Shift differential is provided for week-day evening shift and for first and second shifts on the weekend.

Compensation package includes 401(k) retirement plan & employer sponsored health, dental, vision & life insurance.  JBHS is a Drug Free Workplace.  Successful applicants must pass a pre-employment drug screen and criminal background screening.  EOE.  Positions open until filled.

E-mail cover letter and resume to:

Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services
Attn: Chris Thompson
Job # 2018-16
E-mail:careers@jacksonfeild.org

GREENSVILLE/EMPORIA DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES

LOCAL BOARD MEETING

The Greensville/Emporia Department of Social Services Administrative Board will meet on Thursday, October 18, 2017, at 3:30 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Greensville/Emporia Department of Social Services located at 1748 East Atlantic Street.  The public is welcome to attend.

October is National Domestic Violence Awarness Month

The Family Violence/Sexual Assault Unit program strives to empower and support survivors of domestic and sexual assault. The goal is to help them make choices that will enable them to live productive lives without fear and violence. The Family Violence/Sexual Assault Unit Child Advocacy Center provides support and services to children who frequently are exposed to the same abusive behavior giving them a voice because often abused children are left feeling they have no voice and that no one is listening when they do speak.

The Unit’s values include Safety, Prevention, Accountability, Diversity/Equality, Collaboration, Education, Empowerment/Autonomy and Leadership. The Family Violence and Sexual Assault Unit has combated the effects of domestic violence and sexual assault; ultimately empowering victims in becoming survivors.

WE INVITE YOU TO JOIN US AS WE RECOGNIZE

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AWARENESS MONTH!

PLEASE ATTEND/PARTICIPATE IN THE EVENTS LISTED BELOW!

October 5, 2018, 10AM, The Domestic Violence Awareness Walk

Meet at the Veteran’s Park, behind Emporia Post Office at 9:45 am, walk will begin at 10 am

 

October 18, 2018, 7 PM     The Candle Light Vigil

Main Street United Methodist Church

500 S Main Street

Emporia, VA 23847

 

October 31, 2018, 6 PM – 8 PM      Trunk or Treat       

***Goodwill Parking Lot***

Please Note the Change of Location 

Emporia, VA 23847

Please call 434 -348 - 0100 for additional information

Medicaid Expansion – What It Means For Emporia

Emporia, VA – Enrollment for new, low-cost health care coverage for eligible adults will commence in the Commonwealth of Virginia on Nov. 1.

Virginia Governor Ralph S. Northam, MD, has announced that as the date when the state will begin accepting applications for coverage that takes effect Jan. 1, 2019. The best source for information about this new coverage is available at www.coverva.org. On that website, people can access an eligibility screening tool to determine if they are likely to qualify for coverage. Website visitors can sign up to receive regular e-mail or text message updates about new coverage and the enrollment process.

People can also call 1-855-242-8282 for more information. The information phone line for people who are hearing impaired is 1-888-221-1590.

New coverage for adults is available for men and women ages 19-64 who aren’t eligible for Medicare, and who meet income eligibility guidelines, which vary depending on family size. For example, a single adult who earns less than $16,754 in annual income may be eligible. The income threshold for an adult in a two-person household is $22,715. It is $28,677 for an adult in a three-person household, and $34,638 for an adult in a four-person household.

Earlier this year, the Virginia General Assembly and Governor Northam’s Administration achieved a bipartisan compromise to increase coverage for hard-working, low-income adults in Virginia. This coverage, also known as Medicaid expansion, is available under the provisions of the U.S. Affordable Care Act. Virginia elected officials brokered a fiscally-responsible deal that recovers the Commonwealth’s tax dollars, produces millions in state budget savings that free up funds for other important needs, will improve public health and the economy by supporting job growth, and will benefit Virginia taxpayers.

This plan has public support, with polling showing more than 80 percent of Virginians in favor of a coverage compromise, backing from dozens of local and regional chambers of commerce across the Commonwealth, and from the business and health care community. Private hospitals from throughout Virginia are even contributing financial support to help defray any costs the state may incur associated with increasing coverage access.

“When both sides of the aisle came together earlier this year to pass Medicaid expansion, the Commonwealth set a realistic, aggressive timeline for implementation and I’m proud to report the remarkable progress we’re making on these goals in close coordination with our federal partners,” Governor Northam said in a statement announcing Nov. 1 as the date when Virginia will begin accepting applications for expanded health coverage. “I encourage all Virginians to get acquainted with the new eligibility rules and learn how they and their family members qualify for access to quality health coverage.”

Virginia is one of 33 states that have expanded coverage eligibility for low-income adults. The compromise plan in Virginia includes reform provisions on work and personal responsibility so that people who benefit from the program are invested in their own health and success.

Enabling more people to gain health care coverage also means that people will be able to access timely care in an appropriate setting for their needs, so they can recover soon and go about their lives as productive, contributing members of society.

Right now, many people without insurance delay needed medical care for too long. Eventually, they end up in a hospital emergency room when their condition is much worse, the cost of care is much greater, and their recovery time is much longer. That is not an ideal circumstance for the patient, the health care provider, or the economy because that person is removed from the workforce, and the unpaid cost of their care ultimately gets passed on to taxpayers and consumers in the form of higher insurance rates.

Speaking about the new coverage program, Virginia Health and Human Resources Secretary Dr. Dan Carey, MD, noted that “thousands of Virginia adults will soon benefit from a comprehensive package of health services, including coverage for visits to primary and specialty care doctors, hospital stays and prescription medications. Individuals with chronic diseases will have access to the sustained care that is essential to maintain their health.”

This new coverage, Secretary Carey added, will also help Virginians who need behavioral health and addiction treatment as the Commonwealth continues to focus on improving mental health treatment and combating the opioid epidemic.

“This new coverage will help individuals across the Commonwealth like our friends, our neighbors, our caregivers, and the people we meet daily in coffee shops and restaurants,” said Dr. Jennifer Lee, MD, Director of the Virginia Department of Medical Assistance Services. “It’s critically important that hard-working Virginians will have access to the health care they need to be productive in their jobs and to enjoy a high quality of life.

In Emporia and surrounding communities, as many as 3,300 local Virginians will be eligible to enroll in this new health care coverage. This year alone Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center (SVRMC) is on pace to exceed more than $4.3 Million in charity care.

Spencer Feldmann, MD with Southside Physicians Network (SPN) says, “Because of Medicaid Expansion, patients are more likely to get a primary care physician and get their medical needs met earlier before they become too acute.” All SPN physicians accept Medicaid. “In the long run the conversion to a more preventative medicine based approach is a win not only for the patient, but for the Emporia community.

The Nov. 1 start of the application period for coverage enrollment is days away. Virginia adults interested in learning more about this new health care coverage are encouraged to visit www.coverva.org. People can also call 1-855-242-8282 (or 1-888-221-1590 for hearing impaired people) for more information.

Need to change your name on your social security card?

By Jacqueline Weisgarber, Social Security Public Affairs Specialist in Richmond, Virginia

Are you changing your name? If so, let Social Security know so we can update your information, send you a corrected card, and make sure you get the benefits you’ve earned. 

To change your name on your card, you must show us documents proving your legal name change and identity. If you are a U.S. citizen, you also must show us a document proving your U.S. citizenship, if it is not already in our records. You must present original documents or copies certified by the agency that issued them. We can’t accept photocopies or notarized copies.

To prove your legal name change, you must show one of the following documents:

  • Marriage document;
  • Divorce decree;
  • Certificate of naturalization showing a new name; or
  • Court order for a name change.

To prove your identity, you must show an unexpired document showing your name, identifying information, and photograph, such as one of the following:

  • U.S. driver’s license;
  • State-issued non-driver’s identification card; or
  • U.S. passport.

If you don’t have one of those documents available, we may be able to accept your:

  • Employer identification card;
  • School identification card;
  • Health insurance card; or
  • U.S. military identification card.

To prove your U.S. citizenship, you must show one of the following documents:

  • U.S. birth certificate;
  • U.S. Consular Report of Birth Abroad;
  • U.S. passport (unexpired);
  • Certificate of Naturalization; or
  • Certificate of Citizenship.

Whatever your reason for your name change, Social Security is here to help you with the new… you! Fill out the form at www.socialsecurity.gov/forms/ss-5.pdf and follow the instructions to ensure your Social Security card is delivered in a timely manner. You can also locate your local field office at www.socialsecurity.gov/locator so you can apply for your updated card and show your required documents in person.

For complete instructions, visit www.socialsecurity.gov/ssnumber, which includes information for non-citizens. And remember, if you simply need to replace a lost Social Security card, but don’t need to change your name, you can — in most states — request your replacement card online using your my Social Security account at www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount.

“Just a Housewife”

I think there’s an illusion
in today’s status quo
whereby a college degree
depicts what you know.
 
You see I am a housewife
just simple and plain
I’ve no shingle to hang
embossed with my name.
 
My job though rewarding
starts early each day
I help two of my children
for school get away.
 
Then my next step is breakfast
for that husband of mine
yes he needs my assistance
to reach work on time.
 
Now that everyone’s gone
I can take a short break
then a cry from the nursery
means the babys awake.
 
A quick change is needed
and then some powder to dry
then I refill her bottle
and it’s sleepy time bye.
 
Now it’s off to the kid’s room
to make up their bed
then I out clothes in the washer
and do the dishes I dred.
 
Well it’s lunchtime already
and have the baby to feed
then I make out my list
for the groceries we need.
 
I then get out the stroller
for they say it is wise
to push the baby to market
for your exercise.
 
The shopping all finished
and put the baby to bed
yes and I made shacks for the children
with their favorite spred.
 
Now soon after I’ve vacuumed
and dusted once m ore
the children from school
come through the front door.
 
The sound of their voices
I knew the baby would wake
so outside I sent them
and put on the steak.
 
It was later than usual
when my husband arrived
yet thanks to the snacks
the children survived.
 
Now dinner is all finished
so the dishes I’ll stack
knowing tomorrow at seven
I’m sure to be back.
 
Yes I’m an occupation Housewife
though I’ll make it quite clear
I’m not just a housewife
but a Household Engineer!
 
                    Roy E. Schepp

SVCC Receives Donation from Abilene Motor Express

Abilene Motor Express recently donated a 53’ trailer to the Truck Driver Training School at Southside Virginia Community College. Abilene was founded in 1986 by the Jones family from Charlotte County.  Their successful business, with its home office in North Chesterfield, is well known and highly regarded all around the United States by the trucking industry.  

Duncan Quicke, Coordinator of SVCC’s Training School said, “Abilene has one of the best maintained and most immaculate fleets on the road today, but their sparkling image goes far beyond their pretty green and gold paint scheme. The Joneses are true ambassadors to the trucking profession, and they treat everyone in the industry like family. We are no exception at the Truck Driver Training School. They provide us with the necessary tools to train our students, and they are actively hiring our graduates. Abilene’s generosity helps us continue to run a quality program and prepare drivers for the trucking industry.” 

Current students of the Truck Driver Training School show off the new trailer.

SBA Small Business Lending Momentum Continues in FY18

~SBA FY18 total loan volume reaches more than $30 billion with more than 72,000 approved loans~

 

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Small Business Administration announced FY18 lending numbers showing that it guaranteed over $30 billion to small businesses that otherwise would not have had access to capital.

“We are providing tools, resources and access to capital for America’s 30 million small businesses, and our FY18 numbers bear that out,” SBA Administrator Linda McMahon said. “SBA’s 7(a) and 504 loan programs have never been more dynamic, easy to use and accessible—helping small businesses succeed and thrive.  Our loan programs in FY18 continue to show strong performance, and we believe the President’s tax cuts and deregulatory actions will help more small businesses grow and prosper in the coming year.”

In FY18 there were approximately 60,353 7(a) loans made, with a total dollar amount of $25.37 billion. The 7(a) program is SBA’s flagship program, which offers guarantees on loans to small businesses of up to $5 million on reasonable terms and conditions. 7(a) loans are commonly used for acquiring land, purchasing equipment, or working capital.

The SBA’s 504 loan program had another year of high performance for lending, with 5,874 loans made for a total dollar amount of over $4.75 billion. In FY18 SBA launched the 25-year Debenture, which offers an extra 60 months of financing at a fixed rate for small businesses. Since its introduction in April, over 1,000 debentures had been sold by the end of September.

“The 25-year Debenture is designed to help free up cash flow and offer fixed rates in a rising interest rate environment for 504 borrowers and we are pleased to see over $1 billion has been disbursed in less than six months,” Associate Administrator for SBA’s Office of Capital Access William Manger said.

In FY18 there was significant growth in the SBA’s smaller loans, including a record volume of dollars lent in the Microloan and Community Advantage Programs. Specifically, over 5,000 loans were approved for over $72 million in the Microloan program and over 1,000 loans for over $150 million in SBA’s Community Advantage program.

The SBA continued to innovate and improve processes by leveraging enhanced technologies. Lender Match is an SBA technology platform that gives entrepreneurs the ability to complete a quick online form, without registration or cost, and be connected with an approved SBA lender within 48 hours. To date, Lender Match has generated 3.6 million leads on behalf of small businesses to our lenders and over 160,000 unique borrowers have been contacted by lenders with financing options. 

Another technological innovation was the development of the SBA’s Franchise Directory, which was launched this year and has resulted in an over 50 percent increase in eligible franchise brands. There are currently 3,192 brands on the Franchise Directory. When the directory was first published in October 2017 there were only 2,034 brands.  In FY18, SBA has seen a year over year increase of over 21 percent in 7(a) and 504 dollars going to franchises.

For more information about SBA’s loan programs, financial assistance and other services, visit www.sba.gov.

 

Justin Owen of Skippers Completes SVCC PLW Program

Justin Owen of Skippers and a graduate of Greensville County High School, completed the Southside Virginia Community College Power Line Worker Training Program on September 19, 2018.

The 11-week program provides both classroom and hands-on training in safety, climbing techniques, electrical theory, aerial framing, rigging, Operation Utility Service Equipment and Commercial Driver’s License Training.

SVCC offers the Power Line Worker class in Blackstone Virginia at the Occupational/Technical Center in Pickett Park. For information, southside.edu.

Power Line Worker Students from the eighth class of the SVCC Training Program

Front L-R  Wayne Gates of Petersburg, Chase Simon of Meherrin, George Blackwell of Lunenburg, David Rios of Farmville, Justin Owen of Skippers, Brandon Chumley of Red Oak, Logan Branch of Gladstone, Alex Hite of Kenbridge, Nick Plutro of Carson, Alex Rothgeb of Clarksville, Justin Perez of King George, Brad Wike, Instructor

Back L-R:  Clyde Robertson, Instructor  Adam Ashmore of Disputanta, Charlie Herrin of Oakton, Luke Swanson of Winchester, Nate Trevillian of Monroe, Zac Cavezza of Suffolk, Cole Shornak of Chester, Brian Burch of Crewe, Ian Banker of New Ellenton, SC, Blake Spangler of Salem, and Nick Grigg (Student Instructor)

Building for a Promising Future

By Dr. Al Roberts

Established in 1970, Southside Virginia Community College is one of 23 colleges in the Virginia Community College System. From its humble beginnings, the college has grown to become the leading provider of quality academic and workforce services within the largest community college jurisdiction in our state. The college’s 4,200-square mile service region spans ten counties and also encompasses the city of Emporia.

Meeting the need for education services across such a broad area requires a wide range of diverse options. Consequently, the college serves students from two main campuses, five education centers, and other off-campus sites, as well as through online learning opportunities. The college’s Christanna campus in Alberta currently has six permanent buildings. The John H. Daniel Campus in Keysville has four permanent buildings, including its Learning Resource Center/Student Services building, a 32,700-sqare foot structure completed in 2014. All combined, the college maintains 220,000 square feet of building facilities, 88% of which is allocated for instructional and student use.

And SVCC continues to grow. The college is among the leaders in Virginia’s FastForward workforce credentialing program. Innovative services to help ensure student success continue to be deployed, and connections with area business and industry partners continue to expand.

The college is also growing physically. In September, construction began on a new, two-level Learning Resource Center on the Christanna Campus. The new facility will expand the college’s infrastructure in order to provide exceptional resources for mission-critical activities. When completed in January 2020, the 45,000-square-foot building will house the Christanna Campus library, and it will provide performance space, a food service area, student study and lounge areas, a workout room, and a welcome area. It will also feature a Career Center, a Veterans’ Center, a Credentialing Center, and an IT Training Laboratory. Student services, including financial aid, admissions and records, and IT support, will also be relocated to the new building.

The new Learning Resource Center will play a vital role in the lives of students for semesters and years to come. SVCC offers 23 degrees at the associate level, a host of shorter-term academic and workforce development programs, opportunities for dually enrolled high school students, adult basic education, and other transitional services for non-traditional students. In addition, a comprehensive team of academic advisors, tutors, student services professionals, and counselors are available to help students develop their academic strengths and tackle challenges.

At SVCC, we believe in the transformative power of education to positively impact individual students and the communities we serve. To learn more about how to build your educational future at SVCC, visit the college’s website at Southside.edu or call 434-949-1000. Our team of academic and workforce advisors can help you discover how to create your own promising future.

Dr. Al Roberts is president of Southside Virginia Community College, an institution of higher learning that provides a wide variety of education opportunities to a diverse student population within a service area that spans ten counties and the city of Emporia. He can be reached via email at al.roberts@southside.edu.

More Uses for $222,050

These are the suggestions that have arrived via e-mail and been made in person:

  • Sidewalks all the way to Wal-Mart and Food Lion.
  • Sidewalks along Commomwealth Blvd.
  • Sidewalks along ALL of Main Street
  • A Playground near the I-95/US 58 interchange.
  • Bolster JOB CREATION and ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT.
  • More funding for the Public Schools.
  • Five-day-per-week access to the General Registrar (Why should people not be able to register to vote Monday-Friday?).
  • Longer hours for the Treasurer, so that those working out of town can pay in person, even if only one night per week.
  • An ATM like kiosk for payments to the City (Water Bills, Taxes, etc).
  • Electronic Billing as opposed to just automatic bank draft for payments to the City (without any fees, other cities do it).
  • Creating Mulch/Compost from yard waste and allowing Citizens to use resulting product (an idea that might save money if the City could stop purchasing mulch).
     

This list will be updated and added to as more suggestions arrive.

In the meantime, visit this page for the e-mail addresses of your City Council Member. You can also drop a letter to The Clerk to City Council, PO Box 511, Emporia, Virginia 23847. The Clerk to City Council may be reached by phone at (434)634-7309 and City Administration may be reached at (434)634-3332.

Tags: 

What would you do with $222,050? ***UPDATED***

Editor's Note: According to the Commonwealth of Virginia Department of Housing and Community Development, Emporia is the most fiscally stressed locality in the Commonwealth. There is no city or county in the Commonwealth with a higher fiscal stress rating.

A former menmber of the Civic Center Foundation just informed EmporiaNews.com that that group raised the money and paid to remove the asbestos from the Auditorium. The fact that the asbestos has already been abated, at great expense to the Civic Center Foundation, is yet one more reasons to leave the building standing.

There have been several e-mails sent to the editor echoing the sentiments of this article.

THERE IS NO JUSTIFIABLE REASON FOR THE EMPORIA CITY COUNCIL TO WASTE THE AMOUNT OF MONEY BUGETED ($210,000), PLUS AN ADDITIONAL $12,050 TO "SAVE" PARTS OF THE BUILDING THAT HAVE BEEN DEEMED IMPORTANT BY THE VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF HISTORIC RESOURCES.

Once again, the Emporia City council has decided to waste your money tearing down a perfectly good building.

Please don’t get me wrong, it’s not a spectacular building it has no major architectural character, but it’s ours.  It’s a symbol of a time when our country could come together can put everyone to work.

The building in question is the auditorium on Main Street.  All that remains of the former school complex.  This particular building was built as a Works Progress Administration project in the midst of the great depression if.  The Auditorium is one of three WPA project within the city of Emporia, the others are in close proximity - the Post Office and the Armory.

I say again, it is not a spectacular building, but it is important history.  More importantly, it’s not eating anything nor is it drinking anything.  The city is expanding minimal funds in maintenance, and the building is not connected to any utilities except water and sewer; and those are most likely not being used.

One can imagine countless school assemblies, Christmas programs, concerts and the like being held in this auditorium.  In its more recent history it was the first home of the Meherrin River arts council.  Just like the Victorian school buildings that once stood beside it, this building is part of our history.

It was suggested to a member of City council that the school buildings and auditorium would make an excellent City Hall.  This was several years ago before the schools were torn down.  There was enough space in those buildings to house all of the offices of our city government, and have banquet halls that would rival those of golden leaf commons.  The police department could move into the existing City Hall, or it could have been used as a new library. 

That suggestion fell on deaf ears and two perfectly useful buildings were demolished.

We can listen the City Council share concerns about asbestos, but I saw no asbestos abatement when the schools were torn down.  We can listen to city council when they talk about how it’s a drain on our resources, but as mentioned above the building is connected to no utilities and receives only very minimal maintenance.

One can listen to the City Council until one is blue in the face and one will probably never know the real reason why that August body is so determined to demolish this building.

City council is budgeted more than $220,000 for the task of removing a perfectly useful building, which according to their own architectural review is in good condition and is costing us nothing. 

Just two weeks before the meeting at which City Council decided to waste this money, they entered into a lease/purchase agreement for three vehicles.  That agreement was for $154,000.  By not demolishing the auditorium, the interest payments on at least purchase arrangement could be saved and the city could pay cash outright for those three vehicles.

Much-needed police vehicles aside, $222,050 could pay for much needed expansion and upgrades at the library or even just pay for more computers and additional hours.

$222,050 would more than cover the $172,000 needed to replace our 911 call handling equipment.  The balance could be used to cover the 2% COLA raises for city employees, which total $10,955 according to the most current budget.

In the time that I’ve lived here water bills have more than tripled and sanitation fees have nearly quadrupled.  $222,050 would surely put a dent in the debt service that caused those bills to soar out of control, or the very least pay off whenever debt remains on that new garbage truck. $222,050 would go a very long way toward replacing the water meters in the City, a task that is in dire need of undertaking.

Just looking at the budget, one can see many opportunities to constructively spend $222,050.

Without even leaving the school property, $222,050 would go a long towards making the auditorium and the cafeteria viable for event rental.  In light of the doubling the fees at golden leaf commons, organizations such the family violence and domestic assault unit could continue to use a low-cost facility for their fundraising (or no cost, as this program is administered as a city department).

Knowing that you, the average citizen of the city of Emporia, could pay down your debt, complete existing projects, or avoid incurring new debt, how would you spend $222,050?

The city of Emporia is currently one of the most fiscally stressed localities in the commonwealth of Virginia.  We cannot afford to allow our City Council to squander our money.  The fiscally conservative option is to spare this building demolition and find a useful purpose for it.  No matter what anyone else, especially if they claim to be fiscally conservative, the demolition of the WPA Auditorium on Main Street is not fiscally conservative.

Further, anyone who claims to be fiscally conservative and voted for the demolition of the structure, which is clearly a waste of taxpayer revenue, is not fiscally conservative.

Should the Emporia City Council proceed with the demolition of the Auditorium, or is the money better spent elswhere?

Spotlight on Jobs by the Virginia Employment Commission

Shift Supervisor: Coordinate/Supervise production efforts that drive improvement in all associated work processes affected ESH, complianc3e, reliability, quality, production, and costs. Monitor product quality, assist with troubleshooting, provide safety training and coaching. HSD/GED and 2 or more years experience in an industrial, manufacturing or military environment.  Job Order#1439882

Residential Counselor (Youth Service Worker):  Responsible for role-modeling healthy behavior and teaching life skills to adolescent boys and girls in a residential treatment program. Bachelors degree preferred but not required. Valid driver’s license required. Job Order #1451145

Lathe Technician: HSD/GED required and 1 yr. experience working in an industrial/manufacturing environment.  Will perform on site diagnosis, analysis and resolution of problems. Job Order #1443112

Security Officer: Be at least 18 (21 for some positions). HSD/GED required. Able to work various shifts including weekends/holidays. Patrol various areas to ensure personal, building, and equipment security. Job Order#1446904

Truck Driver:  Must possess a CDL-A with tank and hazmat endorsements and at least 24 months experience.  Excellent driving record a must.  Age 20 or more.. Job Order#1443336

THESE AND ALL JOBS WITH THE VIRGINIA EMPLOYMENT COMMISSION CAN BE FOUND ONLINE AT

www.vawc.virginia.gov

Lake Gaston Baptist Church Adventurers Annual Arts and Craft Fair Saturday November 3, 2018 9:00 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The lake community always looks forward to this annual Arts and Craft Fair, now in it’s 11th year and featuring over 50 vendors!

All items are handcrafted by local and regional artists and designers. Admission is free and drawings for door prizes are held throughout the day. Shoppers will receive shopping bags with a few goodies inside while supplies last. Lunch, snacks and beverages will be available for purchase.

Don’t miss this opportunity to shop for unique handcrafted items!

Interested vendors may contact Lynne Sanders at sanders.lynne@gmail.com or Teresa Freeman at 252-532-3027

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