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April 2019

GREENSVILLE/EMPORIA DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES

LOCAL BOARD MEETING

The Greensville/Emporia Department of Social Services Administrative Board will hold its regular meeting Thursday, July 18, 2019, at 3:30 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Greensville/Emporia Department of Social Services located at 1748 East Atlantic Street.

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  1. Could Hemp Join Tobacco as Big Cash Crop in Virginia?

  2. Hate Crimes in Virginia Jump Almost by Half

  3. White Supremacy Movements Spark Rise In Religion-based Hate

  4. Community College Philanthropists Honored with 2019 Chancellor’s Award for Leadership in Philanthropy

    Joining Microsoft representative, Anthony Putorek, Senior Lead Workforce Development Program Manager, at the Leadership in Philanthropy Luncheon were (left to right), Kelly Arnold, SVCC Apprenticeship Coordinator, Dr. Al Roberts, SVCC President, Dr. Glenn DuBois, VCCS Chancellor, Mr. Putorek, Jeanette Putorek and Dr. Chad Patton, SVCC Dean of Career & Occupational Technology.

    Richmond – The Virginia Community College System and Chancellor Glenn DuBois has presented Microsoft represented by Anthony Putorek, Senior Lead Workforce Development Program Manager,  of Boydton, Virginia, with the 14th Annual Chancellor’s Award for Leadership in Philanthropy. Microsoft was nominated for the award by Southside Virginia Community College.

    Mr. Putorek was recognized along with two dozen other individuals, families, and businesses from around Virginia for their exceptional support of Virginia’s Community Colleges. The awards were presented at a luncheon sponsored by the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education in Richmond on Tuesday, April 16th, 2019. As part of the award, each college will be given funds for the Commonwealth Legacy Scholarship, to be named in honor of the college’s 2019 Chancellor’s Award recipient.

    Now in its 14th year, the Chancellor’s Award for Leadership in Philanthropy recognizes outstanding leaders who have helped support Virginia’s Community Colleges and their respective foundations. This year, among those to be honored are four members of VCCS faculty, all of whom have made contributions that have helped their colleges and their students grow. This year’s class of distinguished philanthropy leaders has contributed a combined total of more than $18 million dollars to Virginia’s Community Colleges.

    Microsoft’s corporate mission is to empower every person and organization to achieve more.  SVCC is a direct benefactor of the company’s efforts through a partnership that includes the donation of data center equipment, the establishment of a scholarship program, and ongoing externships for students.

    According to SVCC president Dr. Al Roberts, “This relationship with Microsoft has become a driving force for SVCC’s fastest growing information technology program.  Microsoft’s generosity extends beyond hardware and financial donations to include personal interest in student success.  The company’s employees tutor, coach, advise, and mentor, fulfilling their mission in our community.”

     

     

    Donald Graham, keynote speaker and Chairman of the Board at Graham Holdings Company and Co-Founder of TheDream.US, spoke about the importance of Virginia’s Community Colleges and the ways that the philanthropists have contributed to the Commonwealth.

    “We are in this room today to tell you, whether you work for one of the colleges or have given to one of the colleges, that what you are doing is absolutely right,” Graham said during his remarks. “I am so proud of this crowd for what you’re doing, and I hope you are proud of yourselves and your fellow donors and of the leaders and teachers at the community colleges you serve.

    Recipients of the 2019 Chancellor’s Award for Leadership in Philanthropy:

     

    • BLUE RIDGE: Dr. and Mrs. Kenneth D. Bowman
    • CENTRAL VIRGINIA: Donna Schewel Clark Charitable Lead Annuity Trust
    • DABNEY S. LANCASTER: Stephen and Donna Vaughn
    • DANVILLE: Danville Kiwanis Club Foundation, Lions Club of Danville Foundation
    • EASTERN SHORE: Tom and Page Young*
    • GERMANNA: Mary Jane Pitts O’Neill
    • J SARGEANT REYNOLDS: Mitchell F. Haddon and Sabine Neumann
    • JOHN TYLER: Amsted Industries
    • LORD FAIRFAX: The Jenkins Family – Russell, Elta Rae, Rodney and Karen
    • MOUNTAIN EMPIRE: Ralph T. and Shirley M. Fisher
    • NEW RIVER: Dr. and Mrs. Lee Wheeler
    • NORTHERN VIRGINIA: Dr. Glenn Fatzinger
    • PATRICK HENRY: The Harvest Foundation
    • PAUL D CAMP: Charles R. Henderson, Jr., Bank of America Foundation     
    • PIEDMONT: H. Gordon* and Mary Beth Smyth
    • RAPPAHANNOCK: Rick and Sue Farmar
    • SOUTHSIDE VA: Microsoft                               
    • SOUTHWEST VA: Mary W. Lawson
    • THOMAS NELSON: Newport News Shipbuilding
    • TIDEWATER: Stanley Black & Decker
    • VIRGINIA HIGHLANDS: David and Schéry Collins
    • VIRGINIA WESTERN: Maury and Shiela Strauss Family
    • WYTHEVILLE:  Floyd and Hilda Jonas
    • VFCCE: The Petters Family Foundation

     

    *honored posthumously

    •  
  5. William E. Ivey, III

    Visitation Memorial Service

    Saturday May 4, 2019, 2:00 pm

    J. M. WHITE FUNERAL HOME

    60 Zeb Robinson Rd

    Henderson, N. C. 27536

     

    Saturday May 4, 2019, 1:00 pm

    J. M. WHITE FUNERAL HOME

    60 Zeb Robinson Rd

    Henderson, N. C. 27536

    HENDERSON-William Edward Ivey, III, age 37, a resident of 140 Dabney Woods Lane, passed away on Thursday, April 25, 2019.  Born on May 8, 1981 in Petersburg, VA, he was the son of William Edward "Buck" Ivey, Jr. of Emporia, VA and Sherry Taylor Fraunfelter of Jarratt, VA.  He proudly served his country in the United States Army serving in Korea and Iraq.   He was a Correctional Officer at the Federal Bureau of Prisons in Butner. Will was a devoted husband and father, loved to travel, and was an avid bow hunter and fisherman.

    A memorial service will be held Saturday, May 4, 2019 at 2 pm in the J. M. White Funeral Home Chapel by Pastor Ken Thrasher.

    He is survived by his wife, Shannon Lucy Ivey of the home; his daughter, Kristen Michele Ivey of the home; one sister, Melissa Harrison of Jarratt, VA ; his step-mother, Anita Ivey of Emporia, VA; two step sisters, Kelli Powell of Skippers, VA and Amanda Temple of Emporia, VA and families; several nieces and nephews; his father-in-law,

    David Lucy of Dolphin, VA; mother-in-law, Sandra Griffin of Blackstone, VA; brother-in-law Shawn Lucy of Emporia, VA; sister-in-law, Crystal Redd of Coats, NC and families; and special friends, Daniel Thrasher and Steve Lewis.   

    The family will receive friends prior to the service on Saturday from 1 until 2 pm and immediately following the service at J. M. White Funeral Home.  At other times they will be at the home.

    In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Wounded Warrior Project, PO Box 758517, Topeka, Kansas, 666-75-8517.

  6. CSI: Career Scene Investigation 2019

    Special Summer Camp for Middle School Students

    South Hill—No, we’re not investigating crime scenes, we’re exploring the world of health care.  Area Middle School students in Mecklenburg, Lunenburg and Brunswick Counties will have the opportunity to attend a unique program at VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital in South Hill that will introduce them to a broad range of health careers.

    A special, one-week, summer camp has been planned for the last week in July entitled, “CSI: Career Scene Investigation” and will focus on the many exciting career opportunities that are available in health care.  Partnering with Southside Virginia Community College, and thanks to VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital, fifteen middle school students who have an interest in a health career will be chosen to attend this summer health care camp during the week of July 29 to August 2.  

    The camp will be offered at no charge to students.  During this week-long camp, students will spend time with staff from many clinical areas and have “hands-on” opportunities.  They will learn how to apply casts and splints, take x-rays, learn about monitoring the heart, spend time in the Emergency Department, dress in scrubs and see the Operating Rooms, learn how to suture, work with Rehabilitation therapists and much, much more!  The week will be fun, interactive, and exciting for the students and VCU CMH staff.

    “We are very pleased to offer to area students this excellent opportunity to learn about the world of healthcare,” said Hazel Willis, RN, BSN, Education Department Manager for VCU-CMH.  “The program will offer a variety of activities that will allow students to observe and interact with health care professionals in their work environment and gain valuable insight into health care careers.  We want to provide a positive learning experience for students and encourage teens to explore health care careers.”

    According to Mrs. Willis, health care careers are the fastest growing, and will be the most in demand careers for the future. Rapid technological and scientific advances in the medical field, along with a large aging population, have created high demand for health care professionals.  The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects the growth rate of new jobs in the health care professions will be twice the rate of job growth in non-healthcare professions. The Bureau of Labor Statistics also predicts a need for 5.3 million health care workers to fill job openings created by departures and new positions in the next five years.

    During the middle school years is the ideal time to reach students and introduce them to career ideas so they can begin to plan a curriculum that includes the necessary sciences and other required courses.

    A total of fifteen students from the Middle Schools with at least a C average will be selected to attend the camp from applications that include a short essay about why they want to attend the camp, and from teacher/guidance counselor recommendations.  Breakfast and lunch will be provided daily for the students.  Transportation to and from VCU Health -CMH will be the responsibility of the student’s parents.  Students will receive a backpack with supplies and a CSI: Career Scene Investigation T-shirt.  Parents will be invited to attend a special graduation ceremony at the conclusion of the week.

    Applications for the camp may be obtained through each school’s guidance counselor or online at www.vcu-cmh.org.  For more information, or for an application, please call Hazel Willis in the Education Department at CMH at (434) 584-5438. 

  7. Demystifying Munchausen’s Syndrome by Proxy

  8. 6 Businesses Win Funds to Address Coastal Flooding

  9. "Pass the Patience"

    Now patience hath no young boy
    at least so I've been told
    yet patience may be the last remain
    when like me; you do get old.
     
    Yes patience for at least to try
    doing things you done well before
    then there's patience just to move around
    for it now takes a while more.
     
    Patience with all of your friendships
    for those once close; may now seem strange
    yes during the length of time gone by
    some of them did also change.
     
    Have patience with your aches and pains
    that may follow you each day
    your strength and body of the past
    has no quarantee to stay.
     
    Always be patient with those around you
    for the most don't understand
    yet one day they'll be in your boat
    and rowing with one hand.
     
                             - Roy E. Schepp
  10. Virginia Coastal Towns Brace for Rising Sea Level

  11. Campaign to End Plastic Straw Use Comes to VCU

  12. Global Expert Panel Discusses Worldwide Politics

  13. VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital Earns ACR Accreditation

    VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital has been awarded a three-year term of accreditation in mammography as the result of a recent review by the American College of Radiology (ACR). Mammography is a specific type of imaging test that uses a low-dose X-ray system to examine breasts. A mammography exam, called a mammogram, is used to aid in the early detection and diagnosis of breast diseases in women.

    "The ACR performs a thorough evaluation of our policies, staff qualifications, interpretations, image quality, and equipment performance,” said Wendy Lenhart, Radiology Director. “Our accredited status gives our referring providers and patients the assurance that our Breast Imaging program at CMH is top notch."

    The mammography department has been accredited since 1994, Lenhart said.

    The ACR gold seal of accreditation represents the highest level of image quality and patient safety. It is awarded only to facilities meeting ACR Practice Parameters and Technical Standards after a peer-review evaluation by board-certified physicians and medical physicists who are experts in the field. Image quality, personnel qualifications, adequacy of facility equipment, quality control procedures and quality assurance programs are assessed. The findings are reported to the ACR Committee on Accreditation, which subsequently provides the practice with a comprehensive report that can be used for continuous practice improvement.

    The ACR, founded in 1924, is a professional medical society dedicated to serving patients and society by empowering radiology professionals to advance the practice, science and professions of radiological care. The College serves more than 37,000 diagnostic/interventional radiologists, radiation oncologists, nuclear medicine physicians, and medical physicists with programs focusing on the practice of medical imaging and radiation oncology and the delivery of comprehensive health care services.

  14. Correctional Officers Honored at 11th Annual Banquet

    Southside Virginia Community College recently hosted the 11th Annual Corrections Awards Banquet at the Christanna Campus in Alberta to recognize Officer and Employee of the year from area correctional facilities.  The event was sponsored by Lawrenceville Correctional Center and the guest speaker was Mr. Harold W. Clarke, Director of the Virginia Department of Corrections.  Those receiving recognition are (Front Row, Left to Right) Officer Shelyne Smith of Lunenburg Correctional, Christine Watkins of Lunenburg Correctional, Shelia Booker of Diillwyn Correctional, Officer Daphne Andrews of Lawrenceville Correctional, Officer Myesha Gaines of Buckingham Correctional, Officer Michael Boone of Deerfield Correctional, Lt. Ronald Gallimore of Halifax Correctional, Lt. Aaron Benny of Greenville Correctional, Officer Milicent Clayton of Nottoway Correctional and Dr. Alfonzo Seward, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice at SVCC and (Back Row, L to RO)Tiffany Robinson of Lawrenceville Correctional, Officer Edward Tolbert of Dillwyn Correctional, Sandra Garner-Coleman of Halifax Correctional, Linda Peete-Pierce of Greensville Correctional, Veesa Gough of Buckingham Correctional, Destiny Johnson of Nottoway Correctional.  Those who were unable to attend are Officer Jennifer Ksor and Dennis Yohe or Baskerville Correctional and Sandra Banty of Deerfield Correctional.

  15. Your Personal Guide to Richmond’s Thrift Shop Scene

  16. SVCC FBLA Members Compete at State Leadership Conference

    Southside Virginia Community College students Janet Wilson(Right) of Farmville and Kimberly Solomon(Left) of South Hill are in the Administrative Support Technology program. These students attended the FBLA-Phi Beta Lambda State Leadership Conference in Glen Allen on April 6, 2019 and competed against students from two- and four-year colleges across the state. Wilson placed first in Computer Applications. Solomon placed first in Administrative Technology and third in Business Communications. 

    In addition to the competitions, the students and advisers participated in informative and engaging workshops on topics that included Keys to Getting the Job You Really Want, Emotional Intelligence, and Beyond Networking. 

    Students were accompanied by PBL advisers, Crystal Jones and Elizabeth Burns.

  17. Richmond Growing Faster Than State and Nation, New Data Shows

  18. Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center Announces Employee of the Quarter

    Chris is presented the SVRMC Employee of the Quarter award.  Pictured, from left, are: Wilson Thomas, CEO, Chris Avent, Peggy Dunn, Director of Surgical Services and Susan Williams, CNO.

    Emporia, VA – Chris Avent has been named the Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center (SVRMC) Employee of the Quarter. Mr. Avent, who works as a Certified Central Sterile Technician in SVRMC’s Surgical Services Department, has been employed at SVRMC since June 1978.

    Each quarter employees are nominated for demonstrating excellence in any or all of ten Standards of Behavior.  Mr. Avent’s nomination included the following statement: “Chris has a sense of ownership and takes pride in his department.  This is evidenced by successful Joint Commission surveys and the numerous compliments from surveyors about Chris’ work. He shows a commitment to his co-workers by jumping into help when necessary and is responsive when assistance is needed. Chris has a positive attitude and is an asset to the facility.”

    As SVRMC’s Employee of the Quarter, Mr. Avent received a certificate of recognition, balloons, cookies to share with his co-workers, a cash award, and a chance to be selected as SVRMC’s 2019 Employee of the Year.

    Chris is presented the SVRMC Employee of the Quarter award.  Pictured, from left, are: Wilson Thomas, CEO, Chris Avent, Peggy Dunn, Director of Surgical Services and Susan Williams, CNO.

  19. Muriel Johnson Doyle

    Graveside Service

    11:00 A.M. Wednesday, April 24, 2019

    Emporia Cemetery

     

    Muriel Johnson Doyle, 98, died Saturday, April 20, 2019.

    A Virginia native, Muriel was the daughter of the late Lloyd Turner Johnson and Annie Bell Gray Johnson. She was a retired homemaker and a longtime member of Main Street Baptist Church. In addition to her parents she was preceded in death by her husband; Larry Doyle Jr., two daughters; Martha Woodbury and Mary Virginia Doyle, a grandson; Larry Wesson, and two sisters.

    Muriel is survived by her two daughters; Judy Gibson and her husband Roger and Sue Creswell and her husband Benny, three sisters; Eleanor Gill, Nancy Johnson and Iris Royster, grandchildren; Tony Wesson, Katherine Gibson, Beth Boyter, Adam Temple, nine Great Grandchildren and two Great Great Grandchildren, and several nieces and nephews.

    Graveside services will be at 11:00 A.M. Wednesday, April 24, 2019 in Emporia Cemetery with Dr. Rick Hurst officiating.

    Online condolences may be left at echolsfuneralhome.com.

  20. Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center Offers Imaging Technology with Hometown Quality Care

        

        

        

    Emporia, VA – The imaging department at Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center (SVRMC) has radiology equipment you’d find in a big city hospital but offers quick appointment scheduling and hometown quality care you’d expect in a small town. Imaging services provide preventive care and diagnosis of diseases including cancer, acute injury and disorders of the bone and muscle. Onsite technology includes digital radiology, nuclear medicine, mammography, computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound with mobile magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) available on specific days of the week.

    Part of the success of the department is due to the long-time leadership of Pamela Low, RT, the director of Imaging since 1979. Through her leadership, SVRMC achieved and continues to earn American College of Radiology Mammography accreditation – the only ACR accredited facility in the Emporia area. She has received multiple Manager of the Year awards.

    When asked about her favorite part of the job, Pam says, “I enjoy taking care of the community where I was born and raised. I love taking care of seniors and developing relationships with patients who come back each year. We’re just a big family around here.”

    To make an appointment have your physician fax an order to (434) 348-4964. To find a provider near you, visit our physician directory at SVRMC.com.

  21. Virginia Trails Nation in Placing Foster Children With Relatives

  22. Higher Limits Now Available on USDA Farm Loans

    2018 Farm Bill Increases Limits and Makes Other Changes to Farm Loans

    WASHINGTON, April 12, 2019 – Higher limits are now available for borrowers interested in USDA’s farm loans, which help agricultural producers purchase farms or cover operating expenses. The 2018 Farm Bill increased the amount that producers can borrow through direct and guaranteed loans available through USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) and made changes to other loans, such as microloans and emergency loans.

    “As natural disasters, trade disruptions, and persistent pressure on commodity prices continue to impact agricultural operations, farm loans become increasingly important to farmers and ranchers,” FSA Administrator Richard Fordyce said. “The 2018 Farm Bill provides increased loan limits and more flexibility to farm loans, which gives producers more access to credit when they need it most.”

    Key changes include:

    • The Direct Operating Loan limit increased from $300,000 to $400,000, and the Guaranteed Operating Loan limit increased from $ 1.429 million to $1.75 million. Operating loans help producers pay for normal operating expenses, including machinery and equipment, seed, livestock feed, and more.
    • The Direct Farm Ownership Loan limit increased from $300,000 to $600,000, and the Guaranteed Farm Ownership Loan limit increased from $1.429 million to $1.75 million. Farm ownership loans help producers become owner-operators of family farms as well as improve and expand current operations.
    • Producers can now receive both a $50,000 Farm Ownership Microloan and a $50,000 Operating Microloan. Previously, microloans were limited to a combined $50,000. Microloans provide flexible access to credit for small, beginning, niche, and non-traditional farm operations.
    • Producers who previously received debt forgiveness as part of an approved FSA restructuring plan are now eligible to apply for emergency loans. Previously, these producers were ineligible.
    • Beginning and socially disadvantaged producers can now receive up to a 95 percent guarantee against the loss of principal and interest on a loan, up from 90 percent.

    About Farm Loans

    Direct farm loans, which include microloans and emergency loans, are financed and serviced by FSA, while guaranteed farm loans are financed and serviced by commercial lenders. For guaranteed loans, FSA provides a guarantee against possible financial loss of principal and interest.

    For more information on FSA farm loans, visit www.fsa.usda.gov or contact your local USDA service center.

    USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer and lender.

  23. Helen Frances Horne

    April 29, 1923 - April 19, 2019

    Visitation Services

    Wednesday, April 24th, 1:00 pm

    High Hills Baptist Church

    215 South Halifax Road
    Jarratt, Virginia

    Wednesday, April 24th, 2:00 pm

    High Hills Baptist Church

    215 South Halifax Road
    Jarratt, Virginia

    Helen Frances Horne, 95, of Jarratt, Virginia died Friday, April 19, 2019 at Manorhouse Assisted Living, Henrico, Virginia. Helen was a lifelong resident of Jarratt and was a member of High Hills Baptist Church her entire life. She was born on April 29, 1923.

    Helen was the youngest child of Jasper Person Horne and Helen Rochette Grigg Horne. She was preceded in death by her parents and her seven siblings; Daisy Horne Finney (Jarratt), Humphrey Horne (Emporia), Richard “Dick” Horne (Jarratt), Josiah B. Horne (Bluefield,WV), Lucy Horne Woodruff, (Rocky Mt. NC), Mamie Horne Briley (Jarratt), and Jasper (Sam) P. Horne Jr (Richmond). Nieces and nephews who predeceased her were Virginia Finney (Jarratt), Dorothy Finney Hall (Jarratt), David A.Woodruff (Wilmington NC) and Robert Woodruff (Jarratt). She is survived by two nieces, Elizabeth Horne Thomas (Midlothian), Patricia Horne Dresser (Vienna) and one nephew, J.P. (Jack) Horne III (Richmond).

    A graduate of Jarratt High School, Helen joined the Home Telephone Company where she later became a Training Specialist that allowed her to be assigned to many localities throughout Virginia. She retired from Contel of Virginia (formally, Home Telephone Co) with 37 years of service. Helen has remained close to her company friends and met with them often at various events. She loved to travel, toured this country and others on wide ranging trips and developed a new group of highly regarding friends. Helen was a meticulous artist of significant repute. Her paintings and handwork are broadly represented in the community. She was in demand for commissioned paintings in oil as well.

    As she grew older, care was provided by her nieces and nephew as well as many friends, for which she was grateful. Of special note is the immediate family of the late Bob Woodruff, specifically his wife, Mary, and their children who were Helen’s principal caregivers. Helen will be remembered for her quick wit and sense of humor which will be sorely missed by all who knew her. Dr. Andy Brockelman, will conduct the service 2 p.m. Wednesday, April 24th at High Hills Baptist Church, followed by interment in the church cemetery. The family will receive friends one hour prior to the service in the fellowship hall. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be the charity of your choice.

    Online condolences may be shared with the family at www.owenfh.com

  24. VCU School of Nursing opens accelerated path to a bachelors to Rappahannock and Southside Virginia Community Colleges

    RICHMOND, Va. (April 16, 2019) — The Virginia Commonwealth University School of Nursing has partnered with Southside Virginia Community College and Rappahannock Community College to offer accelerated coursework to registered nurses who are students at both community colleges, providing them a faster path to obtaining a bachelor’s degree. Students will be enrolled concurrently at VCU and their respective community colleges.

    “We’re looking forward to offering SVCC and RCC nursing students a more efficient path to earn a bachelor’s of science degree in nursing, which subsequently will help to increase the number of baccalaureate-prepared RNs in Virginia’s health care workforce,” said Jean Giddens, Ph.D., dean of the VCU School of Nursing.

    The partnerships are in line with a national push to enhance academic progression for nurses. In 2010, the Institute of Medicine released “The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health” report, which recommended that 80 percent of the nursing workforce be educated at a baccalaureate degree in nursing or higher by 2020. Reduction in medication errors, lower mortality rates and positive patient outcomes are linked to nurses being educated at baccalaureate and higher degree levels, according to a recent position statement by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. 

    Enrollment will open on May 1 to nursing students at both community colleges and classes will start in fall 2019. Enrolled students will complete six credits of baccalaureate courses during their last year at either community college and subsequently complete the remaining credits online through the VCU School of Nursing.

    Both VCU and SVCC aim to increase the number of baccalaureate-prepared nurses who might seek employment at VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital in South Hill, Virginia, and other health care facilities in Southside Virginia, said Michelle Edmonds, DNP, dean of nursing, allied health and natural sciences at Southside Virginia Community College.

    “This partnership brings world-class baccalaureate education to the communities of Southside Virginia,” Edmonds said. “Additionally, the partnership will increase the number of baccalaureate-prepared registered nurses to Southside Virginia. I am certain that SVCC and VCU will together advance the health of this region.”

    The agreement with Rappahannock Community College will provide nursing students in eastern Virginia with more extensive educational opportunities, said Ellen Koehler, an associate professor of nursing for Rappahannock Community College.

    “This concurrent enrollment agreement with VCU School of Nursing is an extraordinary opportunity for the students of the Northern Neck and Middle Peninsula region,” Koehler said. “This affords our students the opportunity to enhance their career goals toward a bachelor’s degree in nursing from a prestigious school that values advancing the profession of nursing.”

  25. Think Tank Warns Against Raising Cigarette Taxes

  26. New Telephone Numbers for the Emporia Police Department

     

    The Emporia Police Department has changed several of its telephone numbers. Please use the numbers below to replace any numbers you are currently using. Even though some older numbers may still be working now, they will eventually be removed.

    • 911 Communications Center Non-Emergency number:

    434-634-7320

    • Emporia Police Administrative Offices:

    434-634-2121

    As always, please use 911 for all emergency calls.

  27. Citizens Expand Efforts to Preserve Historically Black College’s History

  28. Attorney General Mark Herring supports bill to make D.C. the 51st state

  29. Care Bags for Chemo

     

     

     

     

     

    Teresa Collins, Director of Oncology; Julie Smith; Penny Evans, Independent Director of Thirty-One Gifts; Sep Evans, Carleen Wells, Mary Edmonds; and Ronnie Wells.

    An incredible outpouring of community support shattered a fundraiser’s goal this year.

    In the Chemo/Radiation Care Bag Fundraiser’s third year, care bags were purchased, filled with items, and delivered to the Hendrick Cancer and Rehab Center for their patients.

    Penny Evans, Independent Director of Thirty-One Gifts, hoped to get 131 bags this year, but ended up with 305.

    Evans said she started the fundraiser in honor of her friend Shelley Mayer, who was diagnosed with cancer. Today, Mayer is cancer free.

    Members of the community purchased bags for $29, and Evans used the commission of these sales to purchase additional items to go inside.

    Teresa Collins, RN, BSN, OCN and Director of Oncology, provided guidance on the needed items for patients, and each of the 305 bags was filled with a pocket planner, chap stick, tissues, socks, hand sanitizer, and candy.

    Also placed in each bag was a pen and paper set donated by Touchstone Bank and Mary Kay hand creams, donated by Tanya Baskerville, Mary Kay Independent Beauty Consultant.

    A number of community members assisted with filling each bag and delivering them to the center.

    Evans was especially appreciative of her husband’s, Sep Evans, help and support, in addition to the community who made this fundraiser the most successful year yet.

    Tags: 

  30. Horse Racing Returns as Gaming Parlors Open in Virginia

  31. Dr. Thomas Guirkin Is VCU Health CMH’s New VP Of Medical Affairs

    Good ole’ southern charm is easily recognized, but not easily duplicated. The new Vice President of Medical Affairs at VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital recognized that charm at CMH and knew he had found a home.

    “I was impressed by the sense of community I found here,” Tom Guirkin, Jr. MD, said about him landing in Southside Virginia.

    A Richmond native, Dr. Guirkin has spent the past 12 years preparing for his role at VP of MA at VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital.

    "I had been moving from position to position, slowly building my fund of knowledge in order to promote public health. That being said, I really am a small town person,” “I found CMH to be a very good fit for me in that respect.” Over the past 12 years, I have worked in some organizations that were not necessarily the most collaborative of workplaces. I am of the opinion that you can be cordial and collaborative at work and accomplish your goals. I see that type of atmosphere at CMH.”

    Scott Burnette, CEO of CMH said, “We conducted a national search and had several very qualified candidates.  We were fortunate to be able to recruit Dr. Guirkin to our team.  His training and experience will be a great asset as we continue our efforts to grow services and expand our abilities to treat more patients close to home.”

    Dr. Guirkin explained his job at CMH as being not just an administrator or physician but also a resource for the community as a whole.

    “I want to be working with doctors, nurses, finance, the lab – pretty much everyone to make things happen, to better meet the needs of our patients and their families, but also help meet the needs of the employees here at CMH,” he said.

    Dr. Guirkin has an impressive resume and deep Virginia ties. He is a 1999 Summa Cum Laude graduate of VCU with a major in biology and a focus in chemistry. He then attended the Medical College of Virginia, graduating in 2003. From 2003 through 2006, Dr. Guirkin was at Georgetown University Hospital in Washington D.C. where he completed his internship and residency.

    “I loved D.C.,” he said of his time at Georgetown and his first job after residency at Mount Vernon Internal Medicine in Alexandria, VA.

    After Mount Vernon Internal Medicine, Dr. Guirkin headed back to Richmond where he provided inpatient medical services at Saint Mary’s, a Bon Secour Hospital on a full time basis. While doing his primary practice in the hospital, he continued to maintain his outpatient skills by practicing urgent care and primary care services at Patient First. While at Saint Mary’s, he had his first foray into the business, quality and management sides of medicine when he worked at Intercede Health as an order optimizer consultant.

    “I had played with the thought during medical school about getting a Master’s Degree in Business Administration,” he said. “I got my first exposure to process improvement and strategic leadership at St. Mary’s Hospital in Richmond and decided to go ahead and pursue my MBA.”

    While he was attending business school, Dr. Guirkin worked for James River Hospitalist Group in Richmond.

    “That was the start of working seven days a week for two straight years,” he said. “Except for a couple of holidays off, I was working all day, every day between my job and business school.” Dr. Guirkin was providing hospitalist support for Chippenham and Johnston-Willis while attending graduate school at VCU.

    Following his graduation from business school, Dr. Guirkin began to look for a position that allowed him to utilize all of his expertise. He was offered two different administrative positions but declined these due to their not allowing him to continue practicing medicine. It was at this time he was introduced to the Saint Francis Health System in Tulsa, Oklahoma. This finally afforded him the opportunity to grow as a manager yet continue to practice medicine.

    “Saint Francis is a large health system with six hospitals in the Tulsa metro region and I was overseeing a large 60 FTE (Full Time Equivalent) hospitalist group and during my time there it grew to 85 FTEs. It was there I honed my management skills.  I was mentored by a fantastic doctor – Mark Frost, Senior Vice President on many aspects of quality management.”

    The original plan was for Dr. Guirkin to eventually move into a more senior role, but providence had other ideas, he said. “I got a chance email from VCU and decided to take a look,” he said. “And it was exactly what I was looking for. I really appreciate the people here and it’s just a great fit for us. I was impressed that CMH maintained its identity during the affiliation with VCU Health. All the names on all the rooms showed me that this was the type of place I wanted to be.”

    CMH ran a capital campaign where community members could donate and have naming rights to various rooms in the new hospital and C.A.R.E. Building.

    “I will be seeing patients on a limited basis here at CMH,” he said. “Not exactly sure at this point what that looks like, but it was important to me to maintain that aspect of care.”

    He also wants to find unique ways to bring medical care to the communities CMH services.

    “I’m big on preventive medicine and wanting to make sure everyone has access to care,” he said.

    Dr. Guirkin wanted to be closer to his parents who still reside in Richmond.

    Dr. Guirkin and spouse Brian Sharp have two four-legged children a pug name Samantha and a Belgium Mallonois named Tucker. In his spare time, he enjoys running, reading and working in the yard.

  32. Springtime in Paris From SVCC Chorus

    The acclaimed Southside Virginia Community College (SVCC) Chorus, is bringing “Springtime in Paris” with Harpist, Winifred Garrett to Southside Virginia on Sunday, April 28th at 3:00 PM at the South Hill Presbyterian Church at 914 N. Mecklenburg Ave, South Hill, VA 23970. Admission is free.

    The Chorus of the Southside Virginia Community College is fully supported by SVCC, your local community college, and its Foundation. SVCC realizes the value of bringing quality choral music to you in Southside Virginia. Because of the valuable support of the SVCC Foundation, harpist Winifred Garrett from Durham, NC will be performing this Spring with flutes, Dee Pinnell and Laurel Sciortino, both from Boydton. This exceptional concert will be offered at South Hill Presbyterian Church’s accessible space at no cost to you.

    Winifred Garrett last played with the SVCC Chorus in December 2015. She is a noted harpist from Durham where she teaches and performs within a full concert and recital schedule. With a career of over thirty years, Winifred has had the privilege of being the first African American harpist to grace the stage in countless performance venues and settings. The Founder/Artistic Director of “The Harp Studio” based in Durham, North Carolina, highlights from her performance career includes appearances with Stevie Wonder at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York City, performing with Marvin Gaye at Radio City Music Hall, playing the wedding of singer/actress Whitney Houston, and performing with the Boys Choir of Harlem and for the Dance Theater of Harlem. She continues to maintain a heavy performance schedule and is the Principal Harpist for the Fayetteville Symphony. She presently plays for the Umstead Hotel and Spa, one of the prestigious four star/five diamond hotels of North Carolina.

    “Springtime in Paris” features a Romantic selection of music for Harp, Chorus, Piano and Flutes with a French accent, composed by Gabriel Fauré, Aaron Copland, and even a Claude Debussy harp solo. Fresh arrangements of, “Angel Band”, tunes by George Gershwin and Irving Berlin, “Goin’ Home” by Antonin Dvořák, popular love songs,  and music from “Les Miserablés”, are just a sampling of the repertoire to be presented on April 28.

    The SVCC Chorus has been under the direction of Carol Henderson of Buffalo Junction since 2014. And through the support of pianist Sally Tharrington of Boydton, and the inclusion of its great singers, the chorus is growing in vocal beauty. Rehearsals are conveniently located at the crossroads of Highway 58, Route 1, and Interstate 85 at the South Hill Presbyterian Church. The chorus, now 42 members, continues to attract new singers from the surrounding Southside areas. Rehearsals for Fall 2019 will begin on the Sunday following Labor Day, September 8th at 6:00 PM at South Hill Presbyterian Church.

    Thorough continued support by SVCC and its Foundation, we are looking forward to plans for 2019-20 season which include brass and carols for Holiday Concerts 2019,  and  a special presentation of  Handel’s MessiahPart 2 with chamber orchestra for Spring 2020. For more information on the SVCC Chorus: NEW! visit:www. southside.edu/svcc-chorus

    The SVCC Chorus promises to bring you a concert of excellence and beauty,…and what better inspiration than with music of the classical harp and music from France! Presented on Sunday, April 28, 2019 at 3:00 PM at South Hill Presbyterian Church, fully accessible, the concert includes a reception. Church lot parking is available, and also, across the street at Benchmark Bank and the neighboring parking lot. You are invited to bring your families, friends and neighbors for “Springtime in Paris”!

  33. VIRGINIA STATE POLICE CAPTAIN EARNS LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD FOR 25-YEARS OF DEDICATED & INNOVATIVE PUBLIC SAFETY EFFORTS

    RICHMOND – Virginia State Police Capt. Tricia W. Powers is the 2019 recipient of the esteemed Mid-Atlantic Association of Women in Law Enforcement’s (MAAWLE) “Lifetime Achievement Award.” Powers (center) was recognized this week at the 33rd Annual MAAWLE Conference in Poconos, Penn. 

    “Throughout her 25-year law enforcement career, Captain Powers has consistently distinguished herself through outstanding accomplishments, leadership and contributions not only to the Virginia State Police, but to the nation,” said Col. Gary T. Settle, Virginia State Police Superintendent. “With a proven record of success, through partnership, engagement and communication, Captain Powers has embraced new challenges and continues to exceed expectations and provide deliverables that have enhanced the overall capabilities of the Virginia State Police. We are excited for her to be selected for this prestigious and most deserving recognition.”

    Powers began her career with the Virginia State Police (VSP) on Nov. 1, 1993. During the course of her career, she has worked as a special agent in the Department’s Drug Enforcement Section and Fugitive Apprehension Unit. During these assignments, she also achieved the DEA Site Safety Officer Certification for meth lab processing/investigations and acted as the lead investigator on several methamphetamine lab investigations in the Tidewater area. As first sergeant, she supervised and directed investigations for the Insurance Fraud and Auto Theft programs within the Bureau of Criminal Investigation’s (BCI) Chesapeake Field Office.  Later she served as the Area 32 Commander in the Norfolk/Virginia Beach area and supervised the third busiest VSP Area Office in the state within the Bureau of Field Operations (BFO).

    Upon her appointment to lieutenant, she transferred to the VSP Bureau of Field Operations (BFO) Richmond Field Division. In September 2016, she was promoted to her current rank of captain and became the commander of the Criminal Justice Information Services Division (CJIS). The CJIS Division is in charge of the Central Criminal Records Exchange (CCRE), Virginia Criminal Information Network (VCIN), Live Scan, IBR/UCR annual crime report, Sex Offender Registry, Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) and the Firearms Transaction Center (FTC).  Powers oversees approximately 250 sworn and civilian personnel assigned to the CJIS Division.

    She is a 2012 graduate of the FBI National Academy and she is currently First Vice President on the Board of Directors, FBI National Academy Associates Virginia Chapter.  She also represents Virginia as the FBI CJIS Systems Officer (CSO) and is responsible for the administration of the CJIS network with CJIS System Agencies (CSA). 

    The MAAWLE Lifetime Achievement Award is presented to a law enforcement professional with at least 15 years of experience, who has distinguished herself through outstanding accomplishments and contributions spanning her career in law enforcement. MAAWLE is a professional organization of law enforcement officers and individuals promoting women in law enforcement working or residing within the states of Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Washington, DC.

  34. Dr. Quentin R. Johnson Hired as the Next President Southside Virginia Community College

    RICHMOND– Dr. Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges, announced today that Dr. Quentin R. Johnson, currently of Mooresville, North Carolina, will become the next president of Southside Virginia Community College. He will assume the role at the beginning of July. Johnson’s selection marks the end of national search that attracted 81 applicants.

    “Quentin Johnson brings to the table a strong student services background, and a deep understanding of the needs of nontraditional students – a group that we need to focus on,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “And he believes deeply in what we do. In fact, his son is currently attending one of our community colleges.”

    Johnson has worked in higher education senior leadership roles for more than 20 years. That includes, beginning in 2004, serving as the president’s chief of staff and acting vice president for Student Life and Enrollment Management at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. In 2011, he became senior vice president for Enrollment and Student Services at Fairmont State University and Pierpont Community and Technical College in West Virginia.

    Johnson moved to Guilford Technical Community College in North Carolina in 2012 to become the vice president of Student Support Services, the position he holds today. He also has some Virginia experience, previously serving as the assistant dean for Enrollment Management & Student Services at the UVa School of Nursing.

    Johnson earned a doctorate from the University of Maryland Eastern Shore; a master’s degree from Bowling Green State University; and a bachelor’s degree from Defiance College in Defiance, Ohio.

    "After a thorough and fruitful search process, our board is delighted that Dr. Quentin Johnson will be the next president of Southside Virginia Community College.  He brings an energy and insight that will prove to be invaluable in taking SVCC to the next level of service in our communities," said Betsy Sharrett, chair of the Southside Virginia Community College local board.

    Johnson will succeed Dr. Al Roberts, the college’s fifth president, who announced last fall that he was retiring at the end of June, having served as president for five years.

    SVCC serves one small city and spans ten rural counties across southern Virginia. The college offers 23 degrees at the associate level, a host of shorter-term academic and workforce development programs, opportunities for dually enrolled high school students, adult basic education, and other transitional services for non-traditional students.

  35. “(Weather)-2 (Farmers)-1”

    One can wager on your favorite team
    and there might be times you win
    yet if you bet on the weather
    your chances are real thin.
     
    Yes the weather changes often
    leaving many farmers sick
    it matters not the crop abundance
    if the fields are too slick.
     
    It’s a challenge for most of them
    needing rain when it is dry
    then when it’s time to harvest
    it’s too wet to even try.
     
    One must give the farmers credit
    for all the obstacles they face
    each and every year they enter
    but only a few will win the race.
     
    Farmers never know the ending
    though all may start quite well
    yes from day to day and year to year
    the weather casts its spell.
     
    Now the farmer is the backbone
    of the good ole U.S.A.
    yet the government and the weather
    determines what he does every day.
     
                             - Roy E. Schepp
  36. Edith Christine Ferguson

    Visitation Services

    Tuesday, April 16, 1:00 pm

    Echols Funeral Home

    815 Brunswick Ave

    Emporia, VA

    Tuesday, April 16, 2:00 pm

    Echols Funeral Home

    815 Brunswick Ave

    Emporia, VA

    Edith Christine Ferguson, 95, died Thursday April 11, 2019 after a brief illness.

    A native of Brunswick County, she was born January 27, 1924 to the late Edward Esua “Teso” Wrenn and Allie Richard Hobbs Wrenn. In addition to her parents she was preceded in death by her beloved husband Marshall Jackson Ferguson, four brothers and three sisters.

    A Homemaker’s Homemaker, she was an accomplished seamstress, making dance costumes for her children and others. Christine excelled at housekeeping, cooking, gardening, canning, freezing, making pickles, jams and jellies and needlework. She was a longtime active member of Main Street Methodist Church where she was instrumental in the creation of Chrismons for the church Christmas tree. She assisted with Girl Scouting for many years and chaperoned while her late husband drove the bus for the Greensville County High School Band.

    Christine is survived by her daughters; Joyce Potter and her husband Robert of Charleston, SC, and Bonnie Ferguson of Florence, Alabama, a sister Marjorie Wrenn Sheppard of Portsmouth, VA, grandchildren; Wendy Gordon and her husband Ken of Midlothian, VA and Tracy Edgerton and her husband Todd of Crozet, VA, great grandsons; Julien, Simon, and Marshall Gaudet, and Potter and Alton Edgerton.

    Funeral Services will be held Tuesday April 16, 2019 in the Chapel of Echols Funeral Home at 2:00 P.M. with Rev. Tom Durrance officiating. Entombment will follow at Greensville Memorial Cemetery. The family will receive friends at the Funeral Home from 1:00 P.M. until Service time.

    Online condolences may be left at echolsfuneralhome.com.

  37. Brunswick Academy Career Day

    The Brunswick Academy PTO hosted a Career Fair for our Viking students on Tuesday, April 9, 2019.  The day was designed for our 3rd through 12th grade students to learn about the job possibilities in today's world.  Professionals in attendance were an Archaeologist, Engineer, Electrician, Welder, Nurse, Dentist, Physical Therapist, Banker, Author, Pharmacist, Teacher, Attorney, and many more.  We thank all of them for coming and being part it.  To conclude the day, the VCU Health Med Vac Team landed on the football field.  It was a great and informative day that was enjoyed by all. 

    Picture 2 - Loretta Bottoms and Kerrie Combs of Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center, showing students a "glitter bug" hand washing demonstration.

    Picture 3 - Amanda Lipscomb, Pharmacist at Walmart in Emporia, speaks to students.

    Picture 4 - Brunswick Academy Fifth Graders enjoyed the presentation from Jessie Doyle at BSV.

    Picture 5 - Author, Houston T. Kidd reads his book, "Willow the Water Bear" to the Brunswick Academy PreSchool Class.

    Picture 6 - The VCU Health Med Vac Team talks to B.A. High School students.

  38. Let’s Get REAL about Education for Inmates

    By Dr. Al Roberts

    I believe in the transformative power of education.

    Earlier generations considered high school completion the key to success. Many viewed postsecondary education an extravagance because folks with high school diplomas could secure good-paying jobs. Today, that is no longer the case. Finding a job with family-sustaining wages often requires education beyond high school, whether it be the completion of a certificate program, the attainment of industry-recognized credentials, or earning an Associate’s or higher academic degree.

    When it comes to recognizing the benefits of education, incarcerated people are often overlooked. This lapse may be counterproductive. A study completed earlier this year by the Vera Institute of Justice and the Georgetown Center on Poverty and Inequality revealed that inmates who received college-level education were much more able to reenter communities successfully upon release. The report concluded, “Expanding access to postsecondary education in prison is likely to reduce recidivism rates, resulting in a decrease in incarceration costs across states of $365.8 million per year.”

    Lisa Hudson, Coordinator of SVCC’s Campus Within Walls program, has seen compelling evidence regarding the value of education for inmates. “Our prison college program not only benefits Virginia and makes fiscal sense, it also positively impacts our students. We believe that human beings have value and are capable of making positive life changes. We know that 95% of people in prison will eventually be released.  In Virginia, the 13,000 people released annually from prison represent an opportunity.  Through college classes, we prepare incarcerated Virginians to reenter our communities as educated, employable, and taxpaying neighbors.”

    Accessing postsecondary education in prison can pose a challenge, however. Individuals with substantial financial need often receive Pell Grant assistance, but in 1994, federal lawmakers instituted a ban on Pell Grants for inmates. Without funds for tuition, the number of education programs available to people behind bars plummeted. A recent trial program, the Second Chance Pell Experimental Sites Initiative, lifted the ban on Pell Grant eligibility among incarcerated populations at 67 sites across the nation. Data indicate that when inmates access higher education in prison, they are 43 percent less likely to reoffend after release when compared with inmates lacking a similar opportunity.

    The 116th Congress is preparing to consider the legislation “Restoring Education And Learning (REAL) Act of 2019” to reinstate Pell Grant eligibility for incarcerated individuals. Because education is one of the best and most cost-effective means of helping former inmates avoid a subsequent term behind bars, its potential is as REAL as its name.

    Education remains key in efforts to transform lives, families, communities, and the local economy. SVCC remains committed to the belief that all people should have educational opportunities, and that includes the incarcerated people in our service region.

    Dr. Al Roberts is president of Southside Virginia Community College, an institution of higher learning that provides a wide variety of education opportunities to a diverse student population within a service area that spans ten counties and the city of Emporia. He can be reached via email at al.roberts@southside.edu.

  39. ATTORNEY GENERAL MARK HERRING HONORS VICTIMS’ ADVOCATES FROM AROUND THE COMMONWEALTH

    ~ AG Herring presented awards to six honorees at the 3rd annual Unsung Heroes Awards ceremony this afternoon ~

    RICHMOND (April 11, 2019) – This afternoon, Attorney General Mark R. Herring commemorated National Crime Victims’ Rights Week by honoring six victims’ advocates at the third annual Unsung Heroes Awards ceremony in Richmond. The Unsung Heroes Awards honor Virginians who have dedicated themselves to serving victims and fighting for their rights.

    “Today, we are honoring the men and women who have dedicated their time and efforts to victims’ services, but who too often go un-thanked, with theUnsung Heroes Award,” said Attorney General Herring. “These kind, generous Virginians have put in countless hours to make sure that victims know they have someone to turn to when they may feel lost or alone. Each person honored today has provided unmeasurable comfort and support to victims or survivors during their darkest time. It is my honor to recognize these incredible men and women today and thank them for their crucial work.”

    Below are the recipients of this year’s Unsung Heroes Awards:

    Lalita Brim-Poindexter, Attorney, Poindexter Law LLC

    Lalita Brim-Poindexter is the attorney/owner of Poindexter Law, LLC in Southwest Virginia. She has been in the legal field for 15 years and began her career as an Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney in Roanoke City, where she prosecuted crimes against children and victims of domestic violence.  Now, she devotes her work to assisting victims with protective orders and in child custody disputes. She is also a certified Guardian ad litem for children. Over the past year, she has volunteered for TAP (Total Action for Progress), providing legal consultations and pro bono services. She has also partnered with TAP and the Virginia Sexual and Domestic Violence Action Alliance as part of their Project for the Empowerment of Survivors (PES) to ensure that victims in the Roanoke Valley obtain adequate and affordable representation for civil and family law cases when they need it. 

    Steve W. Edwards, Deputy Commonwealth’s Attorney for Isle of Wight County

    Steve Edwards is Deputy Commonwealth Attorney for Isle of Wight County. He has prosecuted crimes against children and sexual assault cases for over 20 years. Along with his daughter, Ashley, he has conducted training programs and demonstrations using horses to teach effective means of communication with severely traumatized witnesses and victims. These sessions are available to law enforcement, prosecutors, social workers, victim witness advocates, guidance counselors and all others whose occupation brings them into contact with people who have suffered brutal trauma. He often brings victims out to his farm to interact with the horses as part of trial preparation. As Executive Director of Gwaltney Frontier Farm, a non-profit equine breed conservation program, he has conducted free weekly sessions working with horses for inpatient PTSD survivors from the Hampton Veterans Hospital.

    Anita Gonzalez, Founder, Peninsula Families United Together

    Originally from Brooklyn, New York, Anita relocated to Virginia in 2014 with her family to escape crime and gangs, only to have her 17-year-old son, Jermell Hayes, shot and killed in 2016. Following this tragedy, Anita saw opportunity and wanted to work to promote healing and curb the violence by turning towards advocacy and connecting with the Catalyst Effect. She talked with leaders involved with the Pastors’ Dialogue on Racism, Poverty and Violence, where she had served on a panel with other mothers of murdered children, and launched “Peninsula Families United Together”, a support group of mothers that meets monthly to help participants work through trauma, forgiveness, accountability and restorative justice. The group works to provide a network for families, responding quickly to offer support during times of tragedy and has met with local law enforcement, prosecutors, faith leaders, funeral homes and human service providers. They are also engaged in outreach and speaking engagements throughout the community to help curb violence and to reach out to others.

    Carly Mee, Senior Staff Attorney, SurvJustice

    Carly Mee is an attorney who provides direct legal assistance to survivors in the campus, civil, and criminal systems. She has represented many survivors in Title IX campus hearings since joining SurvJustice in 2016 and has significantly increased the rate of success for survivors in campus proceedings. In 2017, she also assisted international law firm Steptoe & Johnson in establishing a historic new victim-advocate privilege in federal court. Carly also serves as a liaison to the American Bar Association Commission on Domestic & Sexual Violence. As an undergraduate at Occidental College, she spoke publicly about her own experience of reporting sexual violence and went on to co-found the Oxy Sexual Assault Coalition with other students and professors.

    Brad Roop, Detective, Washington County Sheriff’s Office

    Brad is a native of Radford, VA and currently serves as the Crimes Against Children Detective for the Washington County Sheriff’s Office. Brad began his law enforcement career 21 years ago after being honorably discharged from the United States Air Force. Early in his career, Brad realized that he possessed a passion for helping children and saw the need for someone to specialize in the investigation of crimes against them. Brad is a graduate of the Virginia Forensic Science Academy and was trained as a Child Forensic Interviewer at the National Children’s Advocacy Center. He has received extensive training related to child abuse investigations, child physical abuse reconstruction techniques and perpetrator behaviors. His specialized skills, passion and dedication have aided in bringing countless children to safety and their abusers to justice.

    Kristina Vadas, Victim Services Programs Manager, Department of Criminal Justice Services

    Kristina Vadas is the manager of the Victims Services Team at the Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS), where she provides oversight of all Victims Services initiatives and monitors victim-related legislation, conducts studies, and promotes best practices in service delivery for victims of crime. Kristina represents DCJS on statewide committees and task forces that address human trafficking, underserved victims of crime, services for victims of sexual and intimate partner violence, and other related issues. Previously, Kristina served as the Sexual Assault Program Coordinator for DCJS, where she managed the statewide sexual assault victim services programs, including the Sexual Assault & Domestic Violence Grant Program (SADVGP) and the Sexual Assault Services Program (SASP). She provided technical assistance, consultation, and training to victim advocates, law enforcement, prosecutors, and others requesting information and resources on sexual assault. She also developed resources, policies, and procedures to improve services to sexual assault victims, including those related to Sexual Assault Response Teams (SARTs). 

  40. Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center Announces New Chief Nursing Officer

    Emporia, VA - Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center (SVRMC) is pleased to announce Susan Williams, BSN, MBA/HCM, as Chief Nursing Officer. She joins SVRMC from The Villages Regional Hospital (TVRH), a 307 bed hospital in The Villages, Florida. Williams started her career at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and brings diverse leadership experience from her numerous administrative nursing roles at acute care hospitals in Tampa, Orlando and Miami. “SVRMC is focused on the needs of patients, community and staff members and I’m excited to be part of this collaborative team,” Williams said.

    During her career as Administrative Director of Nursing at TVRH, she implemented plans that increased patient satisfaction by 30%. She also made significant impacts on hospital-wide throughput initiatives, staff recruitment, and service line development such as Critical Care, Orthopedics and Wound Care programs. In her role she also led TVRH’s Stroke re-Accreditation and Chest Pain Accreditation. Williams states that, “It is my goal, as well as all other staff at SVRMC, to provide top quality, compassionate care.”

    Williams has been instrumental in creating multidisciplinary teams of providers and staff to ensure communication within her facilities. She is deeply committed to building relationships and working together with all stakeholders to ensure the highest quality of care and service.

    She earned a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Tennessee State University and a Master of Business Administration in Health Care Management from the University of Phoenix. She has received numerous awards and accolades from Nursing Who’s Who and Advance for Nurses. Williams and husband Bruce were high school sweethearts and are looking forward to exploring Emporia with their grandson, Elijah.

  41. GO Virginia Region 3 announces successful project award for GO TEC

    Up to $4.9 Million to be awarded to broaden the talent pipeline in Southern and Southwest Virginia

    GO TEC (Great Opportunities in Technology & Engineering Careers), a workforce development approach in Southern and Southwestern Virginia, was awarded the largest grant to date from the GO Virginia Competitive Funding pool. The investment by GO Virginia is matched 1-to-1by support from over 15 local partners.

    Workforce training will be provided by seven higher education institutions to address current and future market demand in areas such as precision machining, welding, IT/cyber security, advanced materials and robotics, automation and mechatronics. At the foundational level, K-12 systems are creating Career Connection Labs that introduce middle school students to these in-demand occupationsand then connect their training opportunities to high school and ultimately to higher education institutions. And at the policy level, businesses will be included on the leadership board.

    The GO Virginia State Board approved an investment of up to $4.9 million in the GO TEC project Tuesday morning. The "hub and spoke" workforce delivery system focuses on occupations that have been identified asin-demand in GO Virginia Regions 1, 3 and 4, an area that encompasses many of Virginia’s rural southern counties stretching from Wythe County to Greensville County. For businesses, GO TEC will answer a market need with  a strong pipeline of skilled workers that can support the job requirements of both existing and new employers.

    "It is exciting to see the breadth and depth of regional collaboration among education partners for economic development results that will occur through this unique partnership," Region 3 GO Virginia Council Chairman Charles Majors said. "We are even more pleased that the State GO Virginia Board concurred with our recommendation to support this unique talent development model. We know that the collective work of seven educational partners, in conjunction with the K-12 systems in Southern and Southwestern Virginia, will create a strong tool for talent retention, business retention, and business attraction."

    The GO TEC project leverages existing mastery-level training expertise in seven higher education partners: Southside Virginia Community College, Danville Community College, Patrick Henry Community College, Wytheville Community College, the Southern Virginia Higher Education Center in South Boston, the New College Institute in Martinsville, and the Institute for Advanced Learning & Research in Danville. Each of these partners contributes an element of the career paths identified as areas of critical need in the Regions 1, 3 and 4's Growth & Diversification Plans.

    "I am exceptionally pleased with the level of support from localities and organizations across the regions," said Region 3 Vice-Chairman Randy Lail. "Creative thinking, and building impactful partnerships is the way that rural Virginia can successfully create healthy economies, and this is an example of rural leadership in action."

    GO TEC expands existing outcomes that began with a pilot pre-GO Virginia initiative based at Danville Community College and the Institute for Advanced Learning and Research in 2016.The success of that launch resulted in approval for the first Phase 1 investment by GO Virginia in 2018 when the Region 3 Council was authorized to invest its Per Capita funds. That scale-up wasdesigned to increase the geographic reach of the program, increase the Career Connection labs, and develop the curriculum. 

    This 2019 expansion of GO TEC gives economic developers in Regions 1, 3 and 4 both a stronger workforce system, and more effective marketing message to use in their business attraction efforts.This grant will continue to expand the regional brand of workforce training and increase the number of K-12 divisions that will house Career Connection Labs.

    "GO TEC is an example of the types of effective partnerships that the Regions seek to build through the GO Virginia program," said Julie Brown, interim director of the GO TEC team. "We are excited that our team of higher education partners identified this opportunity and that we were able to demonstrate to the leaders of GO Virginia that GO TEC can successfully scale-up to create an extensive talent marketing message for these three regions."

  42. Virginia student-athletes receive further concussion protection

  43. USDA Announces Buy-Up Coverage Availability and New Service Fees for Noninsured Crop Coverage Policies

    Changes apply Beginning April 8, 2019

    WASHINGTON, April 8, 2019 – USDA’sFarm Service Agency (FSA) today announced that higher levels of coverage will be offered through the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP), a popular safety et program, beginning April 8, 2019. The 2018 Farm Bill also increased service fees and made other changes to the program, including service fee waivers for qualified military veterans interested in obtaining NAP coverage.  

    "When other insurance coverage is not an option, NAP is a valuable risk mitigation tool for farmers and ranchers,” said FSA Administrator Richard Fordyce. “In agriculture, losses from natural disasters are a matter of when, not if, and having a NAP policy provides a little peace of mind.” 

    NAP provides financial assistance to producers of commercial crops for which insurance coverage is not available in order to protect against natural disasters that result in lower yields or crop losses, or prevent crop planting.    

    NAP Buy-Up Coverage Option

    The 2018 Farm Bill reinstates higher levels of coverage, from 50 to 65 percent of expected production in 5 percent increments, at 100 percent of the average market price. Producers of organics and crops marketed directly to consumers also may exercise the “buy-up” option to obtain NAP coverage of 100 percent of the average market price at the coverage levels of between 50 and 65 percent of expected production. NAP basic coverage is available at 55 percent of the average market price for crop losses that exceed 50 percent of expected production.    

    Producers have a one-time opportunity until May 24, 2019, to obtain buy-up coverage for 2019 or 2020 eligible crops for which the NAP application closing date has passed.    

    Buy-up coverage is not available for crops intended for grazing. 

    NAP Service Fees

    For all coverage levels, the new NAP service fee is the lesser of $325 per crop or $825 per producer per county, not to exceed a total of $1,950 for a producer with farming interests in multiple counties.  These amounts reflect a $75 service fee increase for crop, county or multi-county coverage.  The fee increases apply to obtaining NAP coverage on crops on or after April 8, 2019. 

    NAP Enhancements for Qualified Military Veterans

    The 2018 Farm Bill NAP amendments specify that qualified veteran farmers or ranchers are now eligible for a service fee waiver and premium reduction, if the NAP applicant meets certain eligibility criteria.  

    Beginning, limited resource and targeted underserved farmers or ranchers remain eligible for a waiver of NAP service fees and premium reduction when they file form CCC-860, “Socially Disadvantaged, Limited Resource and Beginning Farmer or Rancher Certification.” 

    For NAP application, eligibility and related program information, visit www.fsa.usda.gov/napor contact your local USDA Service Center.  To locate your local FSA office, visit www.farmers.gov.  

    USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer and lender.

  44. Virginia State Police Department’s K9 Gunner received donation of body armor

    Virginia State Police Department’s K9 Gunner’s has received a bullet and stab protective vest thanks to a charitable donation from non-profit organization Vested Interest in K9s, Inc.  K9 Gunner’s vest is sponsored by Margie Bandas of Richmond VA and is embroidered with the sentiment “In honor of Nicolas Castrinos, Richmond VA”

    Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. is a 501c (3) charity located in East Taunton, MA whose mission is to provide bullet and stab protective vests and other assistance to dogs of law enforcement and related agencies throughout the United States. The non-profit was established in 2009 to assist law enforcement agencies with this potentially lifesaving body armor for their four-legged K9 officers. Since its inception, Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. provided over 3,300 protective vests in 50 states, through private and corporate donations, at a cost of over $5.7 million dollars.

    The program is open to dogs actively employed in the U.S. with law enforcement or related agencies who are certified and at least 20 months of age. New K9 graduates, as well as K9s with expired vests, are eligible to participate.

    The donation to provide one protective vest for a law enforcement K9 is $950.00. Each vest has a value between $1,744 – $2,283, and a five-year warranty and an average weight of 4-5 lbs. There is an estimated 30,000 law enforcement K9s throughout the United States. For more information or to learn about volunteer opportunities, please call 508-824-6978. Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. provides information, lists events, and accepts tax-deductible donations of any denomination at www.vik9s.org or mailed to P.O. Box 9 East Taunton, MA 02718.

  45. Northam Signs Proclamation Recognizing Victims of Violent Crimes

  46. Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center Earns ACR Mammography Accreditation

    Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center (SVRMC) Mammography Department has been awarded a three-year term of accreditation in mammography as the result of a recent review by the American College of Radiology (ACR). Mammography is a specific type of imaging test that uses a low-dose X-ray system to examine breasts. A mammogram is used to aid in the early detection and diagnosis of breast diseases in women.

    The ACR gold seal of accreditation represents the highest level of image quality and patient safety. It is awarded only to facilities meeting ACR Practice Parameters and Technical Standards after a peer-review evaluation by board-certified physicians and medical physicists who are experts in the field. Image quality, personnel qualifications, adequacy of facility equipment, quality control procedures and quality assurance programs are assessed. The findings are reported to the ACR Committee on Accreditation, which subsequently provides the practice with a comprehensive report that can be used for continuous practice improvement.

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers among women. SVRMC provides helpful services to educate women on breast health, encourages self-exams and routine screenings. CEO Wilson Thomas explains, “We utilize imaging technology that may detect breast cancer at the earliest stages, when treatment can be most effective. The combination of caring technologists and imaging technology allows us to deliver quality care.”

    SVRMC offers digital imaging technology for mammograms. With digital technology, radiologists can zoom in on particular areas or change brightness or contrast for even greater visibility, and results can be read immediately. It offers numerous benefits to women, including:

    • Improved accuracy of screening exams, especially for women with dense breast tissue
    • Less radiation exposure
    • Greater image quality, reducing the need for repeat exams

    For more information, please contact the Mammography Quality Assurance Technologist at (434) 348-4836. To make an appointment, please have your physician’s office call Central Scheduling at (434) 348-4470.

  47. Making a Difference Every Day

    When you are working with people who are literally fighting for their life, motivation is plentiful. That type of setting allows you to leave work each day feeling like you made a difference. It is a workplace that is exciting to Teresa Collins, RN.

    Teresa has been named the new Director of Oncology at VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital.

    It is a position she feels prepared for. Teresa has been the clinical coordinator for the Oncology Department since 2013.

    Although she is leaving her day-to-day interactions with patients as a nurse and clinical coordinator, Teresa has not forgotten the importance of her team’s work.

    “We have a huddle (staff meeting) every morning,” she said. “And I like to do leadership rounding as often as possible, I want any new patients who come in to either the medical oncology side or the radiation therapy side to know that we are working with them. I want them to know who all can help them with their journey.”

    Teresa is replacing Mary Hardin, RN, who became the Vice President of Patient Care Services at CMH in November. Teresa had been serving as interim director of the Oncology Department since Mary’s promotion.

    “I had the opportunity to work with Mary, first as a treatment nurse beginning in 2011 and then as Clinical Coordinator beginning in 2013,” Teresa said. “Having her just a phone call away is comforting.”

    Teresa enjoys the more cerebral aspects of her new job as director.

    “I like the problem solving and critical thinking that needs to happen as a director,” she said. “I want to always be improving things for our patients and for our staff. It’s a way I can continue to have an impact on the care we deliver. We have a great group of caring individuals in the Hendrick Cancer & Rehab Center and the Solari Radiation Therapy Center. We have outstanding providers who care deeply for our patients and their families.”

    Teresa stressed the level of care in the CMH Oncology Department is comparable to any hospital in the region, regardless of size.  But she also thinks the size at VCU Health CMH has distinct advantages.

    “We have the ability to change quickly here,” she said. “And that is important because in cancer care, things change sometimes daily. There are always new treatment options and therapies. Our staff embraces that change while still caring deeply for our patients. It makes CMH a very special place.”

    Teresa graduated LPN school (Southside Virginia Community College-SVCC) in 2002 and immediately started working at CMH in Med/Surg and telemetry. After becoming an RN in 2006, she worked as a charge nurse on West Wing at the old CMH, as well as a recovery room nurse, and nurse recruiter before moving to the oncology department.

    Teresa has her BSN from Chamberlain College of Nursing and is also now working on her MSN at Chamberlain College. She is a certified Oncology nurse and has received the Alice Tudor Professional Nurse Award twice during her tenure at CMH, in 2013 and in 2018.

    Teresa, a Lunenburg County native, and her husband, Robert, have three children:  Nicholas, 21, who will be a VCU grad in May; Aylor, 11, a fifth grader at South Hill Elementary; and Cooper, 5, a kindergartener as South Hill.

  48. George Thomas Delbridge, Sr.

    Visitation Services

    1:30 PM, April 14, 2019

    Liberty PH Church

    1468 American Legion Rd.
    Roanoke Rapids, NC

    3 PM, April 14, 2019

    Liberty PH Church

    1468 American Legion Rd.
    Roanoke Rapids, NC

    George Thomas Delbridge Sr., 81, of Gaston, North Carolina, formerly of Emporia, Va. Passed away Friday April 5, 2019 at Vidant Medical Center.  He was preceded in death by his mom, dad, and two siblings.

    Thomas is survived by his wife of 59 years Alice Patrick Delbridge of Gaston; his children Wanda Brown of Lake Gaston, and her two daughters Amanda Yarborough of Roanoke Rapids and Amber Keeter and husband AJ, of Knightdale, NC; Tommy Delbridge. Jr. and wife Gail  of Augusta, Ga, and their children Tommy Delbridge and wife Amanda of Greenville, TN, Elaine Martinez of Albuquerque, NM, James Delbridge, and wife Ashley, of Pineville, LA, Brandon Delbridge of Augusta, Ga, and Samantha Brown and husband Marcus, of Las Vegas, NV, Joseph Delbridge of Midlothian, Va; and Doris Delbridge and daughters Megan of Roanoke Rapids, two sisters Molly Harrup of Emporia, VA, and Brenda Romines and husband Olin, of Franklin, VA, Christine Williams of Sidney, OH. Fifteen great grandchildren, multiple nieces, nephew and cousins.

    A memorial service will be held 3 PM, April 14, 2019 at Liberty PH Church, 1468 American Legion Rd. The family will receive friends from 1:30 to 2:30 PM prior to service at church.

    In lieu of flowers make monetary donations to Hockaday Funeral Service, 507 US Hwy 158, Roanoke Rapids, NC, 27870.

  49. Fairy God Mothers Work Their Magic

     

    Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services (JFBHS) is a non-profit behavioral health organization serving adolescent children with severe mental health disorders. Founded in 1855, JFBHS serves more than 100 children annually

    For the past thirteen years Collegiate School students have collected and provided prom outfits to residents through The Fairy Godmother Project. Their mission is to provide a high school prom experience for children whose circumstances would prevent them attending a high school prom.

    Throughout the year, Collegiate School students collect donated prom attire and conducted fund raisers to purchase supplemental items such as shoes and accessories. 

    On Saturday, March 30, 2019, was the “shopping day” for the girls of JFBHS. Collegiate students were able to transform the JFBHS gymnasium into a boutique filled with six racks of prom dresses. Three tables were lined with shoes, an accessory station and even a table for the girls to pick out their make-up.

    The gym was filled with laughter and excitement as residents had smiles from ear to ear on their faces after their successful “shopping experience”. The Collegiate students helped the find the right ensemble that will make them feel and look good at the upcoming prom. The student’s generosity and kindness was much appreciated by both children and staff.

  50. Panther Prep Day is Apri 16, 2019

    Panther Prep Advising Day is coming back to Southside Virginia.   This event, sponsored by Southside Virginia Community College, will be held Tuesday, April 16, 2019 at various locations.  This is a chance for students to meet their advisors, register for classes, learn about all the programs and services the college has to offer.

    Event hours at Christanna Campus in Alberta, John H. Daniel Campus in Keysville,  Southern Virginia Higher Education Center in South Boston, Estes Community Center in Chase City, and  Lake Country Advanced Knowledge Center in South Hill are from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m.

    The Southside Virginia Education Center in Emporia will host the event from 2 p.m. until 6 p.m.

    For more information on the event, call 434 736 2022. 

  51. CBD and THC-A Oil Dispensaries Set to Open Across Virginia

  52. Heated Debate at City Council

    The April 2nd meeting of the Emporia City Council started with the usual agenda items. The only difference at this meeting was that Council Member Woody Harris asked that one item be removed from the bills not paid. The item in question was an invoice from Troutman Sanders for $1,016.20. The expense wan incurred when other members of City Council had questions about the appointment of Marva Dunn to the School Board. The motion to not pay said invoice carried.

    There was no other discussion about the minutes, bills or reports and the agenda was approved.

    City Council presented a resolution to Thelma Adkins-Riley for her work in Civil Rights, a photo and story will follow at a later date.

    Shawn Nicholson, of Crater Workforce Development Board (http://www.craterworkforce.org/) made a presentation on some new workforce programs in the City.  Shion Fenty was also involved in the presentation. Ms Fenty is the representative in charge of the Emporia Center.

    The program – P.O.W.E.R. (Promoting Outstanding Work Ethics & Responsibility) is available to young people age 17-24 who may have impediments to entering the workforce. The program targets 11th and 12th graders, High School Graduates, Dropouts, GED Students and people who have a criminal record.

    Services offered through the P.O.W.E.R. program include job search assistance, Paid Job Training, GED preparation, work readiness skills, a financial education and more. The program also offers career exploration and planning with individual assessments to help participants determine a career path. In addition, there are support services and follow-ups.

    The program was created and is funded thanks to the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act. There are centers in Emporia and Petersburg.

    For those interested in more information, the Emporia Center is located at 1300 Greensville County Circle, Suite C and may be reached at (434)632-0935.

    A presentation was also made with information on the upcoming U. S. Census. Shirley Gilliam made a presentation that stressed the importance of counting all of our citizens. The Census occurs once every ten years, and is the basis for nearly all federal funding, representation to the U. S. House of Representatives and is the basis for redistricting, at all levels - local, state and federal.

    City Council also approved a 180 day extension of the Electronic Gaming Machine Moratorium, giving the City Manager, Commonwealth’s Attorney and others time to formulate a plan on how to deal with the machines going forward.

    Council Member Harris made a motion for an Operation Rule for City Council. This rule would require all expenditures made by members of City Council or officers/employees of the city to gain approval from the Council before any funds are committed or spent. Council Member Yolanda Hines suggested that the item be tabled so that it could be discussed further and the procedures of other localities could be explored.

    In the Public Comments, Jesse O’Neary asked that the City Council consider bringing back the Pork Festival, in cooperation with Greensville County. This festival was good for the City and County, and is “too old for us to get rid of, so let’s fall in love with it.”

    Debra Brown addressed the vote to not pay a bill. She stated that the bill should be paid and was only incurred because the City’s attorney “can’t read or comprehend” the code. She also added that “you knew that you violated the code four years ago and turned around and violated it again in December;” in reference to the appointment of Marva Dunn to the School board. It is the opinion of Troutman Sanders that the appointment was unlawful.

    Melvin Hines also rose to address City Council, saying that it is a “waste of time to talk about not paying this law firm,” and calling the actions of City Council “nonsense and a waste of time. You’ll pay now or pay later.”

    After the public comments, City Council recessed into closed session to discuss “a matter involving the acquisition of real property for public purposes because discussing in an open session would adversely affect our bargaining position.”

    After the closed session (Editor’s Note-I stayed to see if there would be any information about the real property as this has been a closed session item at several meetings, but no action was taken on whatever was discussed in closed session) Council Member Carol Mercer made a motion to reconsider a previous action taken by City Council.

    Council Member Mercer moved to reconsider the removal of the Troutman Sanders invoice from the rest of the bills and not paying it. The motion was seconded by Council Member Hines.

    After the motion was seconded, Council Member Harris objected to allowing Council Member Hines to second the motion, believing that only a member of the prevailing side could second a motion to reconsider. A copy of Robert’s Rules of Order was found, at Council Member Harris’ urging, and the rule was looked up. According to Robert’s Rules of Order, any member of a voting body may second a motion to reconsider.

    On a vote of 4-3, the motion to reconsider was carried.

    Another motion was required to take action on payment of the invoice, and that action carried, also on a vote of 4-3. The Troutman Sanders invoice will be paid with the rest of the bills presented to City Council.

    The motion to reconsider was the most drama-filled portion of the meeting.

    During the discussion of the invoice from Troutman Sanders, the Mayor pointed out that thousands of dollars were spent on phone calls to the law firm when Council Member Harris’ wife applied for a job. This prompted a “point of personal privilege,” during which he accused the Mayor of throwing “another stick of dynamite” on the fire.

    Mayor Mary Person told Council Member Harris that she would not be bullied. Council Member Harris stated that he thought that some bulling had taken place during the recess – implying that Council Member Mercer was forced into making the motion to reconsider.

    This discussion became heated at times, and at one point, Council Member Harris raised his voice at the Mayor. The Mayor showed some frustration, but she did not respond to Council Member Harris in-kind.

    Council Member Harris also stated that it was his belief that the contract with Troutman Sanders only allowed questions from the City Attorney or City Manager, as opposed to any member of Council being able to call and run up a bill. City Manager William Johnson stated that there was no contract.

  53. Jackson-Feild Makes Presentation to Placement Professionals

    Jackson-Field’s, Donna Creasy, presented information regarding Neurofeedback to a symposium of professionals who are tasked with finding the most appropriate and effective treatment for their locality’s youth with emotional and behavioral issues. The topic was Neurofeedback and its utilization in residential treatment

    There was a keen  interest on the part of these professionals regarding Neurofeedback and its effectiveness in treating specific disorders including substance abuse. Neurofeedback is an evidence-based practice that uses electroencephalography or EEG to map brain activity.

    The goal is for youth to understand their brain functioning and gain control over their thoughts and behaviors. They learn how to connect stimuli which are undesirable that associate with negative thoughts and emotions such as depression, anxiety, impulsivity, etc. They learn how to manage these thoughts and feelings and control and improve their behaviors.

    Jackson-Feild has used Neurofeedback as an effective treatment intervention for over twenty years.  It is the only nonprofit organization in Virginia that uses it. Jackson-Feild does not receive any reimbursement for this service. JFBHS believes so strongly in this intervention since it has been so effective that it raises funds to cover this expense.

    Ms. Creasy’ s presentation was very well received and participants walked away with a new appreciation and understanding about the importance Neurofeedback could make in helping their youth.

  54. Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Manish Patel Set To Open New Office in Emporia

    Emporia, VA – Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center (SVRMC) is pleased to announce that Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Manish Patel is will be seeing patients at Six Doctors Drive, Emporia, VA 23847 starting Monday April 15th. Call 757-562-7301 to make an appointment. Dr. Patel says, “There’s a significant need for orthopedic care in Emporia. By coming to Emporia this will provide local access for those who cannot travel long distances for their treatment.”

    Most recently Dr. Patel has gained notoriety for a muscle sparing total knee replacement procedure he has dubbed “The Jiffy Knee.” This procedure may mean less pain and a faster recovery for patients. During traditional knee replacement procedures, muscles are cut to replace the knee. Dr. Patel does not cut the muscle during his procedures. Instead he is able to move the tendon and muscle to the side and replace the knee joint. By not cutting muscle or tendon, patients have experienced less pain and shorter recovery times. This also means that Dr. Patel is able to help patients manage pain without the prescribing opioids. “The most rewarding thing about what I do is being able to provide pain relief and mobility to patients,” says Dr. Patel.

    Board certified by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Dr. Patel specializes in diagnosis and treatment of shoulder, elbow and knee disorders along with emphasis on sports medicine and arthroscopy of these joints. He also treats various hand, foot and ankle conditions along with traumatic injuries. He offers the latest in non-invasive medical and rehabilitative techniques as well as solutions such as joint fluid therapy and arthroscopic surgery. His philosophy of medicine is that he treats every patient as a person and treats them how he would want his family member to be treated if seen by another orthopedic surgeon.

    Dr. Patel has advanced fellowship training in sports medicine and arthroscopy principles which he uses for patients of all ages whether or not they play sports. He works closely with parents, trainers and coaches to provide safe and rewarding experiences for athletes. He also focuses on preventive measures for injuries related to sports.

    He received his medical degree from the Medical College of Pennsylvania Hahnemann University School of Medicine in Philadelphia, Pa. He completed his orthopedic surgery residency at Temple University Hospital, in Philadelphia, Pa., and his arthroscopy and sports medicine fellowship at Mississippi Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Center, in Jackson, Miss. He is a member of the American Medical Association, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy Association of North America.

    SVRMC offers a wide range of orthopedic care to treat patients in and around Emporia. This includes joint replacements, sports medicine, arthritis care and advanced rehabilitation services. From diagnosing your pain or injury to providing treatment, therapy and surgery, SVRMC’s team is here for you.

    To make an appointment with Dr. Patel call 757-562-7301.

    Southampton Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine Center - Emporia

    Six Doctors Drive
    Emporia, VA 23847
    757-562-7301
  55. Truck Driver Training Classes

    Southside Virginia Community College is offering Truck Driver Training in May at locations in Emporia, Virginia and South Boston, Virginia.  The Emporia class will begin May 6, 2019.  Classes run for six weeks.  The South Boston class begins May 13, 2019.

    For information, call Susan Early at 434-292-3101.

  56. State Health Officials Take Steps to Ban Conversion Therapy

  57. First Citizen’s Bank Donates $5,000 to VCU Health CMH Foundation

    South Hill – First Citizens Bank representatives Cindy Thomas, Tammy Manning and Dean Marion present Ken Kurz, Director of Marketing & Development for VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital, a check for $5,000.  The money donated is part of a $25,000 pledge First Citizens Bank made during the 2016-2017 Health Care For Life Capital Campaign.  Donations for the Capital Campaign are still being accepted, for more information call (434) 447-0855. That campaign helped pay for the C.A.R.E. Building that houses most VCU Health CMH Physician Clinics, Administration, Cardiac and Pulmonary Rehab and the Education Department. For their pledge, First Citizens named the Mammography Suite inside the new hospital.

  58. Helen Harvey Bass

    January 25, 1926-April 2, 2019

    Visitation Services

    6-8 pm, Thursday, April 4

    Owen Funeral Hime

    303 Halifax Road
    Jarratt, Virginia

    12 Noon, Friday, April 5

    Zion Baptist Church

    974 Zion Church Road
    Skippers, Virginia

    Helen Harvey Bass, 93, of Skippers, widow of Walter F. Bass, passed away Tuesday, April 2, 2019. She is survived by her son, Clarence E. Bass of Skippers, VA; two daughters, Gail B. Veliky and husband, Wayne of Jarratt, VA and Joanne B. Callaway and husband, Larry of Powhatan, VA; five grandchildren, Shannon Phelps and husband, Chad of Jarratt, VA, Jennifer Askew and husband, Ryan of Stoughton, WI, Heather Knicely of Charleston, SC, Brandon Callaway and wife, Shaina of Chesterfield, VA and Brittany Callaway of Richmond, VA; six great-grandchildren, Amber Defibaugh of Starkville, MS, Jackson Knicely of Mars Hill, NC, Madison Phelps of Skippers, Cameron Phelps of Jarratt and Logan and Nicholas Callaway of Chesterfield, VA; great-great-grandson, Martin Padgett of Starkville, MS; step-grandson, Mason Colley and wife, Lori, and step-great-grandson, Trevor Colley, all of of Raven, VA.

    The family will receive friends 6-8 p.m. Thursday, April 4 at Owen Funeral Home, 303 S. Halifax Rd, Jarratt, Virginia. The funeral service will be held 12 noon, Friday, April 5 at Zion Baptist Church, 974 Zion Church Rd., Skippers, VA. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests memorial contributions be made to Greensville Volunteer Rescue Squad or to Jarratt Volunteer Fire Department.

     Online condolences may be shared with the family at www.owenfh.com.

  59. Ada King Newsome

    October 27, 1926-April 2, 2019

    Graveside Service Celebration of Life

    11 am, Saturday, April 6

    Greensville Memorial Cemetery

    Saturday, April 6, Folowing Graveside Service

    Victory Fellowship Church - Social Hall

    Ada King Newsome, 92, widow of Moses L. Newsome, gained her angel wings Tuesday, April 2, 2019. She now is with her Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ and has joined her loved ones that left her behind. She was preceded in death a brother, Edward King; and sisters Amelia Harris

    She is survived by son, Howard Boney and wife, Virginia daughter, Barbara Allen and devoted and loving son-in-law, Gerald Allen; son, Jimmy Boney and wife, Lelia; step-daughter, Connie Moore and devoted and loving son-in-law, Hubert Moore; stepson. Larry Newsome and wife, Carolyn; grandchildren, Wayne Boney, Michael Boney and wife, Mary, Brent Boney and wife, Britany, Brad Boney, Lisa Crickenberger and husband, Josh; step-grandchildren, Larry Newsome, Jr. and wife, Karen; great-grandchildren, Megan Peterson, Tiffany Spenla and husband, Ian, Matthew Boney, Mckaley Boney, Haylee Boney, Courtney Boney, Daniel Boney (Caitlin Rose), Lyndsee, Josh, Emma and Ryan Crickenberger; Owen and Paisley Boney; great-grandson, Zachary, step-great-granddaughter, Mattie Newsome and great-great granddaughters, Ivey and Evie Spenla; two sisters, Sallie Allgood and Lucille Taylor; numerous nieces and nephews; special and loving friend, Maria Ferguson. She is also survived by her beloved furbaby, Angel and grand–furbabies, Tiny, Spitzy and Ellie May.

    The funeral service will be held graveside 11 a.m. Saturday, April 6 at Greensville Memorial Cemetery. The family will receive friends at a Celebration of Life visitation immediately following the service at Victory Fellowship Church social hall. Mrs. Newsome loved people, especially her family and her church family. She will be remembered for her bright and cheery smile, her generous spirit and devotion to her church. She had requested that her funeral not be a sad occasion, that people attending dress casually and allow a chance for them to accept Jesus Christ as Lord and Saviour. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests memorial contributions be made to Victory Fellowship Church or to the American Cancer

    Online condolences may be shared with the family at www.owenfh.com.

     

  60. SVCC Nursing Programs Tops In State According to RegisteredNursing.org

    RegisteredNursing.org has just released its list of 2019 Best RN Programs in Virginia, and Southside Virginia Community College's RN programs have been ranked among of the best in Virginia! 

    The Christanna Campus program was ranked #3, while the South Boston and Daniel Campus programs were ranked #8 and #9, out of 62 RN programs assessed.

    Nursing programs were assessed on several factors which represent how well a program supports students towards licensure and beyond.

    Dr. Michelle Edmonds, SVCC Dean of Nursing, Allied Health, and Natural Sciences, said, “This designation is certainly an honor.  It validates all the hard work our faculty and staff do to insure student success.  Our program is very rigorous and this clearly demonstrates our success.”

    According to the website RegisteredNursing.org, “Graduates from Southside Virginia Community College in Alberta, Virginia are given five core values throughout the education process including patient-centered care, professional identity, nursing judgement, collaboration and safe and effective care.  These values are what makes the graduates an exceptional addition to the nursing field.”  Christanna Campus scored 97.63 out of 100.

    The site also stated, “Southside Virginia Community College’s South Boston campus offers and ADN degree to prepare students for a career in registered nursing. The curriculum includes coursework and clinical learning experiences arranged within the community to give students a complete nursing education.”  The South Boston overall score was 95.55.

    And this was noted about the final site, “Southside Virginia Community College’s John H. Daniel campus in Keysivlle offers students an exceptional Associate of Applied Science nursing program.  The dedicated faculty guide students to deftly perform the duties of a registered nurse with confidence.”  Their score was 95.32.

    For information on the program at SVCC, contact Rebecca Laben, Health Sciences Counselor, at 434 736 2214.

  61. Walk In My Shoes Takes Positive Steps

    Emily Lucy, an oncology clinical nurse, and Sarah Fox, senior medical laboratory technician discover time-saving steps as part of VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital’s Walk In My Shoes program.

    An ongoing shadowing program that provides staff at VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital opportunities to work alongside other departments has already brought about time saving procedural changes in health care.

    Departments within a hospital tend to have their own unique culture of technical skills, terminology, and workflow practices.

    Christina Duke, Laboratory Department Director at VCU Health CMH, said the program emerged following an employee satisfaction survey. In that survey, employees felt there was an opportunity for better communication between departments.

    “We speak lab,” Duke said. “We may not speak nurse.”

    A subcommittee was formed this past December allowing representatives from various departments to meet and share ideas on where improvements could be made. The “Walk In My Shoes” program was born after Christina Duke shared the idea with clinical practice.

    It didn’t take long before interdepartmental shadowing gained results.

    Sarah Fox, Senior Medical Laboratory Technician, and Emily Lucy, an Oncology Clinical Nurse, together came up with an idea that has reduced the laboratory processing time for oncology patients who are waiting for treatment by 10 minutes.

    Traditionally, a blood sample would be drawn from an oncology patient and then sent to the lab for the processing to begin. The lab has a series of steps to perform with each sample, requiring sanitizing between each step.

    “You do not want any contamination,” Duke said. “It is very meticulous because you are multiplying DNA.”

    The first step is to spin the sample after it is received, which takes about 10 minutes. The instrument then reads the sample, taking an additional 30-40 minutes to run.

    “We saw an opportunity where we could spin the blood sample while waiting for the courier, saving those 10 minutes of testing time in the lab,” Fox said.

    Lucy added, “Anything to speed our patients’ time along in the clinic and to make their day a little better.”

    Other advantages of the program have surfaced.

     “Staff members are able to see the perspective of other departments and see how busy they are,” Duke said.

    As an example, the emergency department learned why analyzing a flu test took so long. “You don’t understand someone else’s role until you see it,” she said, again emphasizing that there are several steps in the process in addition to sanitizing between each to avoid contamination and allow for accurate results.

    In many ways, the program has improved communication between departments and has helped develop a greater respect for each department’s role in the hospital.

    An opportunity for continued growth in teamwork is vital for relationships and success in health care, according to Duke.

    “It has made people feel more comfortable to bring up an idea or issues without feeling judgement,” Duke said.

    Duke said she interviewed Lucy after a two hour walk within the laboratory department. Likewise she said she encourages a reflective conversation when laboratory employees visit other departments.

    “I like to see the outside perspective,” she said.

    The committee continues to meet on a monthly basis to discuss ways departments can continue to partner with one another.

  62. An Open Letter About Cancer Care in Emporia from SVRMC

    Dear Emporia residents and our surrounding communities,

    I would like to let you know about a change of medical services offered in our facility.

    Changes in regulations make us unable to renew the lease for hospital space used by VCU Massey Cancer Center (MCV Associated Physicians'). VCU Massey Cancer Center's last day of service at SVRMC will be April 19, 2019.

    VCU Massey Cancer Center has stated that they do not have the resources to ensure a sustainable model for patient care in Emporia independent from SVRMC. We understand the importance of local access to these services, so SVRMC is currently working with regional oncology institutions to gauge their interest in providing cancer care to our community.

    SVRMC is available to help existing patients to access quality cancer care in other locations. Southside Regional Medical Center offers high-quality cancer care in Petersburg five days a week with hematology, medical and radiation oncology care. Their oncology team is happy to assist you with scheduling and transportation. The contact information for each of these locations is listed below should you decide to schedule on your own.

    SVRMC is pleased to have had a long standing relationship with Massey. It is our sincerest hope that our patients will be able to find the care they need until a new partnership is built to provide cancer care in our community.

    Sincerely,

    Wilson Thomas

    Chief Executive Officer Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center

    Contacts:

    Southside Regional Medical Center 804-431-1100 - medical oncology 804-765-5850 - radiation oncology 804-765-6113 - Cancer Nurse Navigator, Penny Nunnally

    VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital 434-774-2417 - medical oncology 434-774-2481 - radiation oncology 804-828-5116 - new patient coordinators

     

  63. Virginia Preparing for 75th Anniversary of D-Day

  64. Jackson-Feild Promotes Tiffany Moses

    Jackson-Feild is pleased to announce that Tiffany Moses has been promoted to the Residential Coordinator position plays a key role in our residential program. She will coordinate the daily activities of Gwaltney Cottage. She will directly supervise to staff and residents to ensure that each child’s daily treatment plan and goals are being met.

    The Residential Coordinator ensures that each staff members training is up to date, manages staff schedules, that staff are up-to-date with case management responsibilities,  supplies and equipment is available and maintained and ensures that children receive the best possible services and care possible.

    Ms. Moses has helping children since 2003 severing in a variety of settings in Maryland and South Carolina. She joined the Jackson-Feild team in March 2018 as a residential counselor and has performed well in this position.

    She has earned the respect and apprciation of our children and her peers. We look forward to her service in this new capacity.              

  65. Play Golf to Help Jackson-Feild’s Children

    Register/Donate or Sponsor with these links.

    If you are a golfer and want to help mentally ill children please make plans to play in Jackson-Feild’s 24th annual golf tournament on May 6th.

    Funds raised from this event will be used to purchase special psychiatric furniture which is safe and durable for five cottage’s bedrooms.

    The tournament will be held at the Country  Club at the Highlands in Chesterfield County. Lunch is served at noon and the shotgun start begins at 1:00.

    Jackson-Feild’s mission is to provide high-quality mental health services to children who have suffered severe emotional trauma heal and restore wellness so that they can return home.

    If you would like to enter a team or would like to play yourself please contact Terron Watkins at 804-354-6929 or email him at twatkins@jacksonfeild.org to enter or go to Jackson-Feild’s website (www.jacksonfeild.org).

  66. Community Baccalaureate Service Planned for June

    The Greensville-Emporia Ministerial Association will be hosting a Community Baccalaureate Service, tentatively scheduled for Sunday, June 9 at 7 p.m. in the Greensville Elementary School Auditorium. This community service is for ALL graduating high school seniors, regardless of where they attend school: private, public, home-schooled, or Christian school.

    Baccalaureate services have traditionally been held for high school and college students, in conjunction with their graduation services. The baccalaureate is sometimes held the night before graduation, but it is often on the previous Sunday. Attendance is voluntary.

    Local public schools have not held a baccalaureate in several decades.

    The baccalaureate is a religious service and will feature Christian songs and/or hymns, and prayers. There will be a guest speaker or speakers who will deliver a Biblical message of encouragement and inspiration for the graduates.

    GEMA would like to invite all high school seniors who live in the Emporia-Greensville community, regardless of church affiliation, to participate. Formal invitation letters will be sent to all local and area schools. You do not have to register to participate, nor be a member of a church: simply arrive at the school by 6:30 p.m.

    If a student’s school has its own baccalaureate, he/she is still welcome to come to the community service. Our goal is unity in Christ among all people in our community.

    Graduates are asked to wear a white dress shirt, blouse or dress. There will be no distinction among schools. GEMA would like to have all participating students assemble and march in together, then sit together regardless of school affiliation.

    The theme of the baccalaureate will be “The 9/11 Generation.” Most of this year’s graduates were born in 2001, the year of the 9/11 attacks. Their world has been changed and will be forever different as a result of that day.

    A full program with speakers will be announced later this spring.

    Many schools, both public and private, have gotten away from holding baccalaureate services in recent years. GEMA wants to restore this important event as a way to bring our community together, and to let our graduates know that the Christian community loves them and supports them.

    Attendance and participation in this baccalaureate service is entirely voluntary; no participants are sponsored by or endorsed by any government agency; no government funds will be used nor will they be accepted for this service. All expenses are being paid with voluntary contributions by individual citizens and/or the Greensville-Emporia Ministerial Association. Any participation by public school employees or other government officials is voluntary and is done as private citizens.

    Anyone wishing to make a donation or needing more information can contact Ed Conner at (434) 637-2879.

    GEMA began holding Fifth Sunday Community Revivals last year. The theme for GEMA’s community efforts is “Unity in Christ,” based on Psalm 133. GEMA includes churches of all denominations and races and tries to hold events at a neutral location (Greensville Elementary) instead of at individual churches.

  67. Officials Seek to Attract Grocery Stories to ‘Food Deserts’

  68. "Looking Past the Problem

    I read an article the other day
    that should open up some eyes
    explaining why you can’t blame motorists
    for each pedestrian that dies.
     
    Now all of us have problems
    no matter what we say
    yet laws have to be written
    for each one to obey.
     
    Using cell phone is a car or truck
    you still have some control
    still steering a bicycle with just one hand
    hit a bump and away you go.
     
    Now Pedestrians pop out from the side of the highway
    so very much like deer
    you don’t know which way they’re headed
    until you are quite near.
     
    Very seldom do they look both ways
    to check if all is clear
    no most enter the highway; with their head down
    and a cell phone in their ear!
     
                             - Roy E. Schepp
  69. Cancer Care in Emporia

    By E. Brent Perkins, M.D., Ph.D., hematologist-oncologist at VCU Massey Cancer Center

    More than 20 years ago, VCU Massey Cancer Center founded the Rural Cancer Outreach Program to provide state-of-the-art oncology care in areas of rural Virginia identified by high cancer rates and with limited resources and poor access to oncology care. In Emporia, Massey’s Rural Cancer Outreach Program partnered with the community hospital, Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center (SVRMC), to staff a cancer clinic.

    For the last two decades, one or two doctors and one nurse traveled once per week from Massey in Richmond to SVRMC in Emporia. Most recently, that has been nurse practitioner Kevin Brigle and me. We evaluated patients with new diagnoses of cancer, provided follow-up to patients on treatment, made referrals for radiation therapy where appropriate and consulted with local physicians about the care of their patients.

    The program was designed to enable the primary doctors to care for their patients when the outreach doctors were back in Richmond. The outreach clinic operated daily, administering chemotherapy, transfusions and monitoring pain under the supervision of the local physicians and nurses.

    The goals of the program were to provide as much care as possible within the community; teach physicians and nurses living and serving in this community about the care of cancer patients; and bring advanced treatment through clinical trials.

    VCU Massey Cancer Center’s (MCV Associated Physicians’) lease at Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center (SVRMC) has since expired, and Massey was not offered the option to renew it. I regret to share that as of April 19, 2019, Massey will no longer practice at SVRMC.

    While Massey would like to remain in Emporia as a cancer care provider, resources are not available to ensure a sustainable model for patient care that is independent from SVRMC. The Outreach Program was designed to operate in partnership with them.

    To continue cancer care with Massey, we can offer local patients an appointment with another Massey provider at VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital (CMH) in South Hill. Oncology physicians at VCU Health CMH are part of Massey Cancer Center, are well qualified and compassionate and will be able to continue to provide Emporia-area patients with high-quality cancer care. A fully operational clinic is offered five days a week there with hematology, medical and radiation oncology care. Additionally, Massey is assessing the transportation needs of existing Emporia-area patients and will work with them individually to assist them with their transition of care.

    Our providers at Massey’s clinics in the Richmond area are available for referrals and appointments as well. Southside Regional Medical Center, which is not affiliated with VCU Massey, also offers high-quality cancer care in Petersburg that patients may find convenient.

    Furthermore, Massey Cancer Center will continue to serve the Emporia and surrounding communities with health education, screening and prevention programs through our Cancer Research and Resource Center in Lawrenceville.

    It has been my sincere pleasure to serve this community and to get to know many of you. I will miss spending time in Emporia each week. If my team and I can be of assistance to you, please call us at (804) 628-1918. 

  70. April is National Social Security Month

    By Jacqueline Weisgarber, Social Security Public Affairs Specialist in Richmond, Virginia

    It’s National Social Security Month and this year we’re highlighting some of the time-saving features of the my Social Security account. Once you create an account, you’ll see that we already have your work history and secure information to estimate what you could receive once you start collecting benefits.  With your personal my Social Security account, you can also:

    o    Request a replacement Social Security card;

    o    Set up or change direct deposit;

    o    Get a proof of income letter;

    o    Change your address;

    o    Check the status of your Social Security application; and

    o    Get a Social Security 1099 form (SSA-1099).

    For over 80 years, Social Security has worked to meet the changing needs of the American public. Today, you can apply for retirement, disability, and Medicare benefits online, as well as take care of other business.

    Knowledge is power. You care about your friends’ and family’s future, so encourage them to create a my Social Security account. Celebrate National Social Security Month by learning what you can do online anytime, anywhere at www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount.

  71. Winter realizes a digital dream at VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital

    How fun is it to get to be on Facebook, Twitter, and the Internet all day long and get paid to do it?

    Jason Winter will tell you it’s a blast.  Winter is the new Digital Marketing Specialist at VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital and his job focuses on the promotion and marketing of VCU Health CMH in all ways digital.

    “I get to bring my years of experience in website design, graphic design and videography to the exciting world of health care,” he said. “And specifically to VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital. I enjoy how the job combines my interests and past experience.”

    Winter explained that his new position is designed to lead the development of VCU Health CMH’s digital marketing content and exploration of online channels to reach an even broader audience than CMH’s current market footprint.

    “We understand that the digital world is expanding,” said Ken Kurz, director of marketing and development for VCU Health CMH. “Jason brings such a wealth of experience to us. We thought he was the perfect fit for this newly created position. We are expecting great things from him in regard to reaching folks in new and exciting ways.”

    Winter comes to VCU Health CMH from the Mecklenburg County Public School System. He worked for the schools system for nearly 13 years with the last half of his tenure serving as an Instructional Technology Resources teacher in the school’s technology department.

    He also taught middle school and high school English during his time with the schools.

    Winter received a bachelor’s of arts degree from Virginia Tech in 2004 and a master’s of science degree from N.C. State in 2007.

    Winter and his wife, Melanie, have two daughters, JoBeth and Sue. Winter enjoys gardening and travel during his non-work time.

  72. Clary’s Cool Job Keeps Her Down On The Farm

    Bridgette Clary’s job is cool because it allowed her to follow her heart into farming, something she was raised on and dearly loves. She started her new job on March 6 and is the Virginia Territory Sales Representative for Zeigler's Distributor, Lebanon, Pennsylvania.

    “I am responsible for overseeing existing accounts and generating new sales for my territory. Zeigler's is a family-owned pet food and supply distributor that distributes several high- quality brands,” she said.

    An SVCC alumnus with an Associate of Applied Sciences with specialization in Agribusiness, she said, “When I first started college I was on a totally different career path than Agribusiness, but growing up on the farm and being involved with it my whole life, eventually my heart led me 'home'.”

    She notes that she grew up on her great grandparent’s farm near Alberta where they raised beef cattle, tobacco and small grains. She spent her childhood on the farm and her parents often had to beg her to come home. This is also where she was introduced to cattle or ‘moo cows’ and continues her love of raising these animals.

    “I currently live on a beef cattle and small grain farm with my fiancé, David, where we breed and raise Sim/Angus and Black Angus cattle along with wheat and soybeans. When I'm not working or showing dogs, I enjoy spending my time riding my horses and working cattle,” she said.

    After her graduation from SVCC, Clary continued to work in the agriculture field with a sales job at E.E. Vaughan and Sons in Lawrenceville and, with animals, at Brunswick Veterinary Clinic in Lawrenceville.

    “My biggest piece of advice to any new student, or any student for that matter, would be to never give up on your dreams. It was important for me to be able to study the field I wanted to major in and remain close to home on the farm,” she said. 

    “I compete in AKC dog shows across the country all throughout the year and being able to remain close to home and study my field of choice while being home on the weekends to attend shows was ideal. I have been involved with competition hunting and showing Coonhounds since I was 13 and currently raise, breed and handle national winning UKC and AKC registered Treeing Walker and Bluetick Coonhounds,” she noted.

    About her advisor and AGR instructor,  Dr. Dixie Watts Dalton, clary said she was a huge part of her success at SVCC.

    “I will forever be grateful to her and SVCC for offering such an amazing program,” she said.   

    In the future, continuing her education in anything that is agriculturally based is very important.  Her goal is to continue to be actively involved with the agriculture field through her current job and any future job as well as to continue to produce and raise beef cattle.

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