Send news tips, story ideas and advertising questions to news@emporianews.com.

Emporia News is best read in LANDSCAPE view on Mobile Devices. Please rotate your phone or tablet.

Current Weather Conditions

 
Seven Day Forecast for Emporia, Virginia
 

Community Calendar Sponsored By...

 

How About A Pawpaw?

Pawpaw fruit is often called the “Poor Man’s Banana” because its taste is a cross between a banana and a mango with a hint of pineapple.

A little-known fruit with amazing flavor

Perhaps you’ve never heard of a pawpaw, let alone eaten one. But the sweet, creamy tropical fruit was once a common staple for Native Americans and colonial settlers in the Commonwealth—and a rumored favorite for two former United States presidents.

Both George Washington and Thomas Jefferson are said to have been passionate about pawpaws, which they planted and cultivated at Mount Vernon and Monticello. The pawpaw is the largest edible fruit native to North America. It was first documented in 1540 by a Portuguese explorer on an expedition to the New World who noticed Native Americans eating the fruit.

Pawpaw looks similar to a mango, and its flesh has a custardy texture that is not only sweet and delicious to eat as is, but also is a common ingredient in mouth-watering jams, jellies, pies, tarts, smoothies and ice cream. No wonder Washington and Jefferson are said to have enjoyed a good pawpaw in their day.

Despite its popularity then, pawpaw somehow became a fruit of the past, but not anymore. The once-obscure plant is growing in popularity again. Pawpaw grows in approximately 26 states, mainly in the eastern region of the country, and it is believed to have been spread throughout the region by Native American tribes. Even today, pawpaw can still be found at Mount Vernon and Monticello.

If you’re interested in learning more about pawpaws, growing them or just sampling the juicy delicacy that tastes like a cross between a banana and mango with a hint of pineapple, then you won’t want to miss the Pawpaw Production and Marketing Workshop on Sept. 6 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Virginia State University’s Randolph Farm Pavilion at 4415 River Road, Petersburg, VA. Admission is $20. Pre-registration is required.

A limited number of exhibition spaces are available at the workshop on a first-come, first-served basis. The exhibition fee is $50 and includes two six-foot tables and two chairs. Table skirting and access to electricity will not be provided. One complimentary registration is provided per exhibit space. Exhibition setup will begin at 7 a.m.

To register for the workshop or to reserve exhibition space, visit http://www.ext.vsu.edu/pawpaw. Boxed lunches will be provided for participants and exhibitors.

The keynote speaker for the workshop is Neal Peterson, nationally-known pawpaw plant breeder, who will present on basic pawpaw production. Peterson will be joined by several farmers who will share their experiences growing and marketing pawpaw. Participants will also be able to sample locally grown varieties of pawpaw.

Pawpaw doesn’t just taste good, the fruit is also nutritious and high in vitamin C, magnesium, iron, copper, manganese and several essential amino acids. As an added bonus they also have significant amounts of riboflavin, niacin, calcium, phosphorus, and zinc, all of which contribute to a healthy body.

“Pawpaw was an important fruit during colonial times, and is now growing in popularity more for its taste and nutritional value,” said Dr. Reza Rafie, a horticulture professor and an Extension specialist for the Virginia Cooperative Extension at Virginia State University. “Pawpaw is easy to grow, and has good potential for local markets.”

If you have any questions about this event or are a person with a disability and desire any assistive devices, services or other accommodations to participate in this activity, please contact Mollie Klein at mklein@vsu.edu/804-524-5960/TDD (800) 828-1120 during business hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. to discuss accommodations five days prior to the event.

Extension is a joint program of Virginia Tech, Virginia State University, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and state and local governments. Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. An equal opportunity/ affirmative action employer. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. Edwin J. Jones, Director, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; M. Ray McKinnie, Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State University, Petersburg.

 
 
Pawpaw could be called a "wonderfruit" because it is high
in vitamin C, magnesium, iron, copper and manganese
and also is a good source of potassium and
several essential amino acids.

 

Tags: 

Emporia News

Stories on Emporianews.com are be searchable, using the box above. All new stories will be tagged with the date (format YYYY-M-D or 2013-1-1) and the names of persons, places, institutions, etc. mentioned in the article. This database feature will make it easier for those people wishing to find and re-read an article.  For anyone wishing to view previous day's pages, you may click on the "Previous Day's Pages" link in the menu at the top of the page, or search by date (YYYY-M-D format) using the box above.

Comment Policy:  When an article or poll is open for comments feel free to leave one.  Please remember to be respectful when you comment (no foul or hateful language, no racial slurs, etc) and keep our comments safe for work and children. Comments are moderated and comments that contain explicit or hateful words will be deleted.  IP addresses are tracked for comments. 

EmporiaNews.com serves Emporia and Greensville County, Virginia and the surrounding area
and is provided as a community service by the Advertisers and Sponsors.
All material on EmporiaNews.com is copyright 2005-2019
EmporiaNews.com is powered by Drupal and based on the ThemeBrain Sirate Theme.

Submit Your Story!

Emporia News welcomes your submissions!  You may submit articles, announcements, school or sports information or community calendar events via e-mail on news@emporianews.com. 

Contact us at news@emporianews.com
 
EmporiaNews.com is hosted as a community Service by Telpage.  Visit their website at www.telpage.net or call (434)634-5100 (NOTICE: Telpage cannot help you with questions about Emporia New nor does Teplage have any input the content of Emporia News.  Please use the e-mail address above if you have any questions, comments or concerns about the content on Emporia News.)