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Seven Day Forecast for Emporia, Virginia
 

2017-1-17

 

Large Yard Sale-219 Brunswick Road. Friday June 30 and Saturday July 1 7am until

"How Much Does a Snowman Weigh?"

Now I am sure that it will vary
In its size and shame and all
Yet id seems that so very little
Caused my large gazebo to fall.
 
Yes it busted the canvas and supports
Almost halfway to the ground
Now I didn't see or hear it
But this is what I found.
 
Well I should have taken it down I guess
Yet I really didn't know
You see in this particular area
It's not noted for deep snow.
 
its a lesson that i learned
And for now I've just despair
Yes every time I go outside
That mess is hanging there.
 
Now it's just material and no one got hurt
It's a blessing that I see
Yet i wonder how many in this wide world
Are just as smart as me!
 
-Roy E. Schepp

Willard Parker Moore

Willard Parker Moore, 88, of Skippers, VA passed away on January 16, 2017. He was preceded in death by his parents, Otis Fletcher Moore and Donnie Tudor; sisters, Gladys Moore Taylor, Effie Moore Lifsey, Margaret Moore Grizzard, Mary Collins, and Ida Woodruff; brothers, Otis Fletcher Moore, Jr. and Edward Moore. He is survived by his sisters, Louise Moore Taylor, Alice Moore Blankenship, Inez Moore Whitlow, and Bernice Moore Lewis; brother, Otis Warren Moore and numerous nieces and nephews. A funeral service will be held Wednesday, 2 pm, at Zion Baptist Church with interment to follow in the church cemetery. Memorials may be made to Zion Baptist Church Cemetery Fund. Condolences may be sent to www.Echolsfuneralhome.com

Faculty Members Push For College Funding

By Haley Winn, Capital News Service

RICHMOND – More than 30 students and faculty members from Virginia colleges and universities gathered in Richmond to urge legislators to protect funding for higher education.

Virginia Higher Education Advocacy Day, an annual event sponsored by Virginia Commonwealth University’s Faculty Senate, aimed to deliver a basic request to lawmakers: make fewer cuts and add more funding for state colleges and universities.

Pat Cummins, a member of the VCU Faculty Senate, said, “We have one major event of the year, and this is it.”

Brian Turner, who launched Advocacy Day in 2003 with colleagues in the American Association of University Professors, said Thursday’s turnout of students and professors was larger than he expected.

Faculty members expressed concern about the impact students would feel directly as a result of more budget cuts. The effects could include shorter library hours and fewer tutoring services, along with higher tuition fees to make up for money the schools aren’t receiving from the state.

The benefits of funding for colleges and universities go beyond the classroom, experts say. According to a report published in 2014 titled “Addressing the Cost of Public Higher Education in Virginia,” those benefits include greater economic growth and reduced societal health-care costs.

Gerard Sherayko, a professor at Randolph College in Lynchburg and president of the Virginia Conference of the AAUP, said a better educated population is a healthier population. Sherayko said the entire state benefits when people have the ability to make more money, pay more taxes and do more things with their money.

“I teach at a private school,” Sherayko said, “but these issues matter to all of us.”

While the main goal of Thursday’s event was to urge legislators to resist calls to cut higher education funding, faculty members also highlighted bills before the General Assembly that they support or oppose.

According to Cummins, some of those bills would impose on academic freedom by requiring specific courses as part of a student’s curriculum. Another bill would require faculty members to ask students for documentation that they are U.S. citizens or legal residents.

Del. Kory Honored For Supporting Higher Education

By Haley Winn, Capital News Service

RICHMOND – Del. Kaye Kory, D-Fairfax, accepted the American Association of University Professors’ Michael S. Harris Award on Thursday for her “exemplary service in support of higher education.”

The award is presented each year in memory of Col. Harris, who served as president of the Virginia Conference of the AAUP.

The AAUP recognized Kory for her efforts to promote inclusivity in academe, as well as her support of bills to protect minorities and immigrants. This legislative session, Kory is sponsoring bills defending the public’s right to speakat open government meetings and prohibiting workplace discrimination.

In 2016, the award was presented to Del. David Toscano, D-Charlottesville.

Capitol is Site of Dueling Gun Rallies

By Jessica Nolte and Jessica Samuels, Capital News Service

RICHMOND – Unified by their desire to preserve safety, but divided on ways to do so, both sides of the Virginia gun debate rallied on Capitol Square on Monday.

“Hello deplorables. Are you ready to take back the Commonwealth of Virginia?” Corey Stewart, a Republican candidate for governor, asked as members of the Virginia Citizens Defense League rallied in the morning.

Stewart cautioned the crowd that while it is possible to lose a battle and win the war, that means it is also possible to win the battle and lose the war. He said they won the battle for the presidency with Trump’s 2016 election.

“We have to gain the controls in Virginia because it’s not just enough to defend our rights, we need to further those rights,” Stewart said.

It’s not enough to have control in Washington, he said.

“There are gun grabbers. One of them is right over there in the governor’s mansion,” Stewart said.

Sen. Dick Black, R-Loudoun County, told the story of an uprising in Mexico, and said that while the rebels won on the battlefield, they ultimately had to surrender because they ran out of ammunition.

“I want to see the American people armed,” Black said. “The only way we control our government is by being too resistant to be suppressed.”

Many members of the group donned camouflage, and several wore hats distinguishing themselves as military veterans or Donald Trump supporters. Most of the attendees marked themselves with bright orange stickers that said “Guns Save Lives.”

Some attendees at the rally were openly carrying firearms.

“Every event that we have, we make a special point to invite people who are carrying,” Black said. “You’re welcome to bring whatever you want. You can open carry, you can conceal and carry-- anything that we do.”

Later that afternoon the Virginia Center for Public Safety held its rally in the same location, at the Bell Tower.

“We’re not out here being unreasonable,” said Lt. Gov. Ralph S. Northam, a Democratic candidate for governor.

“All we’re asking – all we’re asking – is that we can live in communities, that we can work in communities, that we can play and that we can raise our children and have them to go to school to be in safe environments where they don’t have to worry about being the victims of gun violence,” Northam said.

Speakers throughout the rally mentioned the 32 deaths from the 2007 Virginia Tech shooting, the 26 deaths from the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting and the 49 people killed in the Orlando night club shooting .

“For the fifth year in a row, gun homicides in Virginia are on the way up,” Attorney General Mark Herring, a Democrat, said.

Herring said that while the General Assembly ought to take action, he will not wait.

“We’ve gone from prosecuting almost no crimes out of the office of attorney general to over one hundred gun crimes in 2016 alone,” Herring said.

Speakers at both rallies said guns should be taken out of the hands of criminals. Speakers at the Virginia Center for Public Safety rally said the way to do that was through legislation, including increased regulation at gun shows and stricter guidelines for background checks.

“I served in a chamber whose response to gun violence is a moment of silence,” said U.S. Rep. Donald McEachin, a former member of the Virginia Senate. “What is that about? A moment of silence never saved anyone.”

Barbara Parker of Collinsville, the mother of Allison Parker, the Roanoke journalist who was killed on live television in 2015, was at the rally.

We will be here till we have sensible gun legislation in our state and in our country. People can’t assume it can never happen to them or to their loved ones,” Parker said.

Ricky Gray Scheduled for Execution Wednesday

By Jessica Nolte, Capital News Service

RICHMOND – Gov. Terry McAuliffe has denied the American Civil Liberties Union of Virginia’s clemency request on behalf of death row inmate Ricky Javon Gray.

Gray’s execution by lethal injection is scheduled for Wednesday.

“Mr. Gray was convicted in a fair and impartial trial, and a jury sentenced him to death in accordance with Virginia law,” McAuliffe said.

The Virginia Department of Corrections will carry out the execution as planned unless a court intervenes.

The ACLU-VA sent a letter to McAuliffe on behalf of Gray on Friday. The letter requested Gray’s sentence be changed to life without parole.

“The ACLU of Virginia is saddened and disappointed that Gov. McAuliffe has chosen to allow the Department of Corrections to execute a human being,” Claire Guthrie Gastañaga, executive director of the ACLU-VA, said in a statement Tuesdsay. “Execution is a cruel and, increasingly unusual, punishment and is never the correct response to any crime, no matter how abhorrent.”

Gray’s attorneys have filed an emergency stay of execution with the U.S. Supreme Court after 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals denied their request.

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