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2017-12-19

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Job Posting

Maintenance Worker

Job Posting #:  2018-1

Psychiatric residential treatment facility is seeking a full-time Maintenance Worker. Job duties include basic building and vehicle maintenance, performing equipment and building safety inspections, painting, plumbing, basic carpentry, electrical, & HVAC repair and installation.  Qualified candidates must possess the ability to work independently with little supervision while exhibiting quality workmanship. 

Formal experience in plumbing, electrical, carpentry, or HVAC is required.  Tradesman certification in one of the above listed trades is preferred.

Must possess the ability to frequently lift eighty pound objects.  Working conditions include work both indoors in climate controlled areas and outdoors in temperatures in excess of 90 degrees and in temperatures below 32 degrees.  Competitive pay & benefits including company sponsored 401(k) plan, health, life, dental, and vision insurance.  Post offer drug screen, physical, and criminal background screening required.  Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services is a Drug Free Work Place.  Position Open until filled.  EEO. 

Mail, fax, or e-mail cover letter and resume by February, 19, 2018 to:

Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services

Attn: Chris Thompson

Job#:  2018-1

546 Walnut Grove Drive

Jarratt, Virginia 23867

Fax: (434) 634-6237

E-mail:  careers@jacksonfeild.org

Career Opportunity

Residential Counselors

(Youth Service Workers)

If you are interested in making a positive impact on the lives of Virginia’s youth, then we want you to become part of our Team!  Rural Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facility located in Jarratt, Virginia seeks positive role models to work directly with adolescent boys and girls in a psychiatric residential treatment program.  The Youth Service Worker is responsible for role-modeling healthy behavior, teaching life skills, administering a trauma informed behavioral support program, and leading youth in and participating in social, cultural, and recreational activities.  This position supervises youth in the residential unit and on off-campus activities and appointments.

Must possess the availability to work weekends, evenings, holidays, and nights.  Supreme flexibility required.  Seeking candidates with Bachelor’s Degrees in Psychology, Sociology or other Human Services field.   Experience will be considered in lieu of a degree.

Compensation package includes 401(k) retirement plan & employer sponsored health, dental, vision & life insurance.  JBHS is a Drug Free Workplace.  Successful applicants must pass a pre-employment drug screen and criminal background screening.  EOE.  Positions open until filled.

E-mail cover letter and resume to:

Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services

Attn: Chris Thompson

Job # 2018-2

E-mail:careers@jacksonfeild.org

Career Opportunity

Melvin L. Davis Oil Company, Inc. is currently searching for Management Team Members.  We have openings from crew leaders all the way up to GM’s at various locations.  Our team has been the key to our success and growth so far and we’re looking for more people with the right skills and personality to join us.

Our Company:

The Davis family opened a small restaurant in rural Sussex County, Virginia in 1956. The entrepreneurial spirit continues today as the third generation has established two modern travel centers in Virginia, including one near the site of the original 15-employee restaurant. Today the company has expanded to more than 250 employees and serves professional drivers and traveling motorists along I-85 and I-95 in Virginia. In addition to the large, clean travel centers with food options in Stony Creek and Warfield, we also operate an Exxon service station and convenience store in Prince George, a Mobil service station and convenience store in Stony Creek, a Popeye’s, a Wendy’s and a Denny’s.  Our team has been the key to our success and growth so far and we’re looking for more people with the right skills and personality to join us.  Customer service is the foundation of our company, and it’s the job of every team member regardless of title.  Be a part of a talented team where you will be challenged each and every day.  We are a quickly growing company, and promote from within whenever possible.  Your opportunity for growth inside of our company is exciting.

Job Requirements:

•Minimum 1-3 years of leadership experience in the retail, grocery or other service industry with responsibility for financial results.

Benefits:

•Competitive Salary ranging from $28,000-$55,000.00 annually depending on experience plus 10% annual salary bonus potential paid quarterly for GM’s.

•Benefits that include a great medical package, dental insurance, vision insurance, life insurance, disability insurance and AFLAC.

•Paid Time Off.

•100% match of up to 4% of salary in the 401K plan.

•Discounts on fuel

•Discounted meals for employees on and off shift from 10% to 100% depending on position

Resumes can be sent to Jeanne Moseley at 434-246-2520 or jmoseley@dtc33.com or apply online at https://www.snagajob.com/job-search?ui=true&q=davis+travel+centers&w=23882

December, 2017, SVCC Welding Graduates

Recent successful completers of the Southside Virginia Community College Workforce Development Welding Skills Certification course December 13, 2017 at the Southside Virginia Education Center.  

This is an 11-week program utilizing the NCCER Curriculum at the accredited training and education facility.  Those finishing the most recent class are shown (Left to Right) Donald Brown of Bracey, Michael Walker of Lawrenceville, Jason Vincent of Emporia, Stacy French of Emporia, Monta' Gray of Skippers, Rasha Green of Emporia, Andre Clary of South Hill, Derrond Vaughan of Lawrenceville and Dr. Marcus Bridges, SVCC Welding instructor. 

Dozens of Virginia Nursing Homes Fined for Violations

 

By Gillian Bullock and Diana DiGangi, Capital News Service

When we think about where our loved ones will spend their golden years, most of us don’t picture understaffed facilities employing known abusers, or dementia patients warehoused, mistreated and helpless to advocate for themselves. But citations issued by government inspectors paint a grim picture of long-term care at dozens of facilities in Virginia.

Evelyn Lee and her sister were faced with the decision of placing their mother in a nursing home when their mother experienced a stroke. Lee’s mother selected a nursing home that best suited her needs of acute care for her to undergo physical therapy. When Lee’s mother’s health began to steadily decline, Lee and her sister started their search for a long-term care facility.

“We looked to see if there was availability, if the nursing home was easily accessible to my sister, and the general aesthetic such as how the facility looked and smelled,” said Lee, a reverend at First Baptist Church Bute Street. “When looking at facilities, we looked at the state survey and looked to see if any citations were given to the nursing homes.”

Of the 290 nursing homes in Virginia, 72 nursing homes have faced penalties totaling more than $4.7 million since 2014, according to data posted online by Medicare, the government agency that provides health care for elderly Americans.

The facilities that have incurred the most fines are:

§  Montvue Nursing Home in Luray, with more than $600,000 in fines.

§  Cherrydale Health and Rehabilitation Center in Arlington, with almost $240,000 in fines.

§  Harrisonburg Health & Rehabilitation Center in Harrisonburg, with more than $192,000 in fines.

Together, those three nursing homes accounted for about 22 percent of the total amount of fines in Virginia.

Penalties run the gamut of severity. While nursing homes are often cited for relatively minor infractions like failing to post staffing information, many nursing homes across Virginia have been cited in the past several years for more serious violations.

For instance, 116 nursing homes have been cited on 176 counts for failing to either “1) hire only people with no legal history of abusing, neglecting or mistreating residents, or 2) report and investigate any acts or reports of abuse, neglect or mistreatment of residents.”

One Richmond nursing home, Envoy of Westover Hills, has been cited for that infraction seven times since July 2015. That was more citations than any other facility in the state received during that time period. Envoy’s nursing director could not be reached for comment.

The nursing directors at two other facilities that had been cited multiple times for this same infraction – Culpeper Health and Rehabilitation Center in Culpeper, and Carriage Hill Health and Rehab Center in Fredericksburg – also couldn’t be reached for comment.

Long-term care professionals who are dedicated to their jobs and compassionate to their patients say they struggle to keep going in an industry that often does not hire enough staff for its facilities and underpays its staff.

Jordan James, former employee of Home Elderly Care, says she enjoyed her time at the facility and keeps the memories of her patients close to her heart.

“One of my patients that stands out to me is Mary,” James said. “She taught me sign language, and she would always show me her family albums with pictures of her husband, children, siblings and grandchildren.”

But at many homes, there aren’t enough skilled assistants like James.

“Staffing levels are deficient,” said Gretchen Francis, ombudsman for the Capital Area Agency on Aging. “Most for-private facilities do not have enough staff in comparison to the number of residents on the floor. Will residents have to wait for assistance and be in their bed while they’re soiled, or try to wait for assistance and need help going to the bathroom and fall? The state recommends 15 minutes to respond to residents, but there is no regulation.”

According to the Center for Public Integrity, a nonprofit investigative journalism organization, more than 80 percent of nursing homes are reporting higher levels of registered nurse care to a government-run website for consumers than are reflected in their reports to Medicare.

“As a hospice chaplain, I have seen many nursing homes,” Lee said. “I have seen quality nurses, but facilities were simply understaffed. CNAs [certified nursing assistants] tend to the patient’s personal needs, and they are overworked and their salaries are very low. Their salaries should increase, and they should only have three patients under their care.”

Advocacy by family members can be powerful in ensuring that residents are treated well.

“Residents with strong advocates receive better care,” Francis said.

While Lee’s mother was in a nursing home, she realized how vulnerable the elderly are without someone to act on their behalf.

“I can remember when visiting with my mom and thinking, if I wasn’t there, what would have happened? Whatever nursing home you go to, the family has to be visibly involved and serve as an advocate,” Lee said.

Francis suggested that adult children do their research before they choose a place for their parents.

“Not only look at state inspections but see what kinds of citations were given,” she said. “If there are significant care issues, I would look into that. The type of citation itself can tell you what type of care the resident will receive.”

Both Emporia Manor and Greensville Manor are only rated at one star. Greensville Manor, however, was fined $159,215 on 09/09/2016.

How to track nursing home quality

During the 1960s, elderly Americans were the population group most likely to be living in poverty. The U.S. government responded by creating a national health insurance initiative. Since 1965, Medicare and Medicaid have provided services to almost all Americans 65 years or older.

A federal agency called the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services annually tracks the quality of care at every nursing home nationwide certified by those programs. The agency recently released the latest data for penalties, deficiencies and inspections involving nursing homes.

You can search the datafor information about a specific home or download the entire database.

Over the past three years, nursing homes in Virginia have been cited for 7,658 deficiencies. When citing deficiencies, Medicare & Medicaid Services uses an assessment that determines the severity of each deficiency with a letter of A through L. The most egregious deficiencies are classified as level four. Facilities in Virginia were cited with 20 level-four deficiencies.

Virginia’s state government has an office that can be an advocate for elderly residents who encounter problems receiving long-term care. The Office of the State Long-Term Care Ombudsman can help bring about changes at the local, state and national levels to improve care and quality of life. More information about the agency is available at http://www.elderrightsva.org/

About the data used in this report

Multimedia journalists Gillian Bullock and Diana DiGangi analyzed federal data to examine abuse incidents, penalties, deficiencies, understaffing and inspections of nursing homes in Virginia.

Bullock and DiGangi downloaded data on nursing homes from Medicare.gov. The two journalists used Microsoft Access to extract the records for nursing homes in Virginia.

Bullock focused on penalties. She sorted the data to identify the Virginia nursing homes that had incurred the most fines.

For deficiencies, Bullock filtered in descending order the nursing homes with the highest deficiencies from A to L. Bullock found that Medicaid categorizes deficiencies into four classes. Class one are deficiencies of A, B and C; class two are deficiencies of D, E and F; class three are deficiencies of G, H and I; and class four are deficiencies of J, K and L. Class four includes the most egregious deficiencies.

DiGangi focused on the datasets involving abuse incidents and understaffing. For instances of abuse, for example, she filtered the data to identify nursing homes that had failed to “protect each resident from all abuse, physical punishment, and involuntary separation from others.”

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