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2017-3-22

GREENSVILLE/EMPORIA DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES

LOCAL BOARD MEETING

The Greensville/Emporia Department of Social Services Administrative Board will meet on Thursday, July 20, 2017, at 3:30 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Greensville/Emporia Department of Social Services located at 1748 East Atlantic Street.  The public is welcome to attend.

Middle School Forensics Competition

On Friday, March 17th, Brunswick Academy’s fifth, sixth, and seventh grade Middle School Forensics Team participated in the AVA Forensics Competition at Kenston Forest School. This exceptional group of students left the competition with third place in fifth grade, second place in sixth grade, and first place in seventh grade. Overall, the Middle School Forensics Team placed second in the competition. The students who participated and their rankings are as follows:

Fifth Grade

5th grade photo - Front (l to r) - Charlie Pope, Natalie Hall*, Bryn Montgomery*, Lane Whitehead, Madalynn Writtenberry. Back(l to r) Savannah Nunnally*, Chris Parrish, Denver Wright, and Berkeley Jones*.

Girls’ Prose – Madalynn Writtenberry, Boys’ Prose – Chris Parrish, Girls’ Poetry – Lane Whitehead, Boys’ Poetry – Charlie Pope, Girls’ Monologue – Bryn Montgomery – 3rd Place, Boys’ Monologue – Berkeley Jones – 2nd Place, Serious Speech – Savannah Nunnally – 3rd Place, Humorous Speech – Denver Wright, Spelling – Natalie Hall – 1st Place

Sixth Grade

6th grade photo - Front (l to r) - Cullen Corum, Rahilly Abernathy*, Allie Short*, Ashton Phillips*. Back (l to r) - Cassidy Smith*, Meredith Greene*, Katie Lambert, Matthew Gullivan*,  and Davis Whitehead*.

Girls’ Prose – Allie Short – 1st Place, Boys’ Prose – Ashton Phillips – 1st Place, Girls’ Poetry – Rahilly Abernathy – 2nd Place, Boys’ Poetry – Matthew Gullivan – 1st Place, Girls’ Monologue – Meredith Greene – 1st Place, Boys’ Monologue – Davis Whitehead – 3rd Place, Serious Speech – Cassidy Smith – 2nd Place, Humorous Speech – Katie Lambert, Spelling – Cullen Corum

Seventh Grade

7th grade photo - Front (l to r) - Alora Decorte, Harrison Harper*, Vincent Edmunds*, Lydia Smith*, Bryson Poarch*.  Back (l to r) - Shana Love*, Alyssa Rivas*, Emily Roberts*, and Brett Allen*.

Girls’ Prose – Lydia Smith – 1st Place, Boys’ Prose – Vincent Edmunds – 2nd Place, Girls’ Poetry – Alyssa Rivas – 3rd Place, Boys’ Poetry – Brett Allen – 2nd Place, Girls’ Monologue – Shana Love – 1st Place, Boys’ Monologue – Harrison Harper – 2nd Place, Serious Speech – Alora DeCorte, Humorous Speech – Emily Roberts – 1st Place, Spelling – Bryson Poarch – 1st Place

*denotes placed in their category

The Good News about Shoulder, Knee and Hip Joints

Community Out-Reach Education

South Hill – Joints can be damaged by arthritis and other diseases or injuries.  Arthritis, or simply years of use may cause the joint to wear away.  This can cause pain, stiffness, and swelling.  Your doctor may suggest a joint replacement to improve your quality of life.  When something goes wrong with the shoulder, hip and knee joints, what are the options for treatment?  Can joint injections help?  What can joint protection exercise/therapy do for you?

If you are seeking answers to questions like these you should attend June’s C.O.R.E. (Community Out-Reach Education) Program at VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital’s Rehab & Exercise Therapy Center to learn more about shoulder, knee and hip joints.

This FREE program will be on Thursday, March 23rd at 11:00 a.m. in the CMH Rehab and Exercise Therapy Center located at 750 Lombardy Street in South Hill.

Patti Turczany, PT, LAT, MS, CDT/MLD will be the speaker for the program.  Patti received her Bachelor’s degree from Southern Connecticut State University, a Master’s degree in Education with a concentration in Athletics from Fort Hayes State University in Kansas and a Master of Science degree from the University of Indianapolis Krannert School of Physical Therapy.  She holds an oncology certification, complete complex decongestive therapy certification in lymph drainage and has pediatric specialty.  She is McKenzie trained in treatment of spine therapy, has manual skills training in therapy, orthopedic training and is a certified licensed athletic trainer.

Other joint information classes for 2017 will be held from 11:00AM – 12:00PM at the CMH Rehab and Exercise Therapy Center on the following dates:  May 11, August 10, October 12. 

Reservations are not required for this program; however, they are recommended.  For more information or to register to attend, please call (434) 774-2506.

Photo:

Patti Turczany, PT, LAT, MS, CDT/MLD

Walk seeks to raise awareness about eating disorders

 

By Amelia Heymann, Capital News Service

RICHMOND – Bayan Atari, a public relations major at Virginia Commonwealth University, has spent nine months in treatment for an invisible ailment. Two of her friends have died from the disorder. Atari is one of 30 million Americans struggling with an eating disorder.

Despite the prevalence and severity of the condition, Atari and others have had trouble getting help. That’s because many people have misconceptions about eating disorders, experts say.

“If you’re not underweight, they might not take you seriously. At my sickest, I was still at a normal weight, and that was enough to be like, ‘Well, you’re not dying, you have an electrolyte imbalance, but you’re not dead,’” Atari said. “Even in the medical system, I’ve known people whose kidneys were failing, but because they were overweight or normal weight, they were not given the care they needed.”

Efforts are underway to bring attention to eating disorders.

On Saturday, the National Eating Disorders Association will hold its first NEDA Walk in Richmond in hopes of raising awareness about the problem. The walk will begin at 10 a.m. at the VCU Commons Plaza.

Kristen Tully, the organizer of the walk, expects 200 to 300 people to participate.

Tully decided to organize the walk because she herself is in recovery. When she was in the throes of her eating disorder, Richmond didn’t have an eating disorder clinic or other resources to help.

However, in the last five years, more resources have popped up. One is Stay Strong Virginia, which has compiled lists and maps of treatment programs and support groups for people with eating disorders. Stay Strong Virginia helped Tully organize Saturday’s walk.

Another resource is Veritas Collaborative, a treatment center for eating disorderson Broad Street. Veritas is a sponsor of the NEDA Walk.

It’s important to get someone with an eating disorder into treatment because the illness can be fatal. Someone dies from their eating disorder every 62 minutes, according to the Eating Disorders Coalition.

The main kinds of eating disorders are:

  • Anorexia, or restricted eating. This can lead to severe dehydration, which sometimes results in kidney failure.
  • Bulimia, or binging and purging. This can cause inflammation and possible rupture of the esophagus from repeated vomiting.
  • Binge eating, or eating to excess. This can cause high blood pressure, diabetes and other health problems.

Meredith Kerley, a therapist who specializes in eating disorders, said getting treatment is important, but recovery involves more than that.

“I always say the work really begins when someone leaves treatment,” Kerley said. “Treatment is a kind of way to break the pattern and get one’s body into a healthy place. Once they leave that bubble, there’s the pressure of doing all these things whether or not someone tells them to. It’s far from cured when someone leaves treatment.”

Tully agreed. She said recovery is never linear. “It’s hills and valleys, and recovery isn’t easy. It’s the hardest thing you will ever do.”

Not everyone with an eating disorder is lucky enough to get treatment. Only one-third of people suffering from anorexia receive treatment – and only 6 percent of those suffering bulimia.

Part of this may be due to the stigma of an eating disorder. According to a 2010 study, 12 percent of people surveyed believed eating disorders are related to vanity. Kerley said that notion is patently false.

“There’s always emotion underlying it (the eating disorder),” Kerley said. “It’s not about the food, and it’s not the vanity, but that’s how it manifests.”

For Atari, the trigger was personal issues rather than her body image.

“I was miserable,” Atari said. That is when she turned to using bulimia. “The terrible part is that it works. You need to cope with something, and it works, and I couldn’t see anything else working as well.”

Eating disorders are often accompanied by other mental illnesses, such as depression and anxiety.

“Sometimes, eating disorders do develop as a way to cope with anxiety or depression,” Kerley said. “Other times, malnutrition can certainly affect the brain and cause depression.” She said it can be hard to tell which mental illness comes first.

It also can be impossible to tell who has an eating disorder and who doesn’t. Kerley has had 20 to 30 patients over the years, ranging in age from 12 to 50. Many have been of normal weight, and the patients include men.

“There’s kind of a stigma it’s an adolescent girl’s issue, but I see the whole range, and again, it is males and females,” Kerley said.

More about Saturday’s NEDA Walk

You can register for the walk on the NEDA website. Online registration ends Friday, but that’s to guarantee getting a T-shirt. People also can register in person at 9:30 a.m. Saturday at the VCU Commons Plaza, 907 Floyd Ave., Richmond. If you can’t walk, you can sponsor a walker or make a donation on the NEDA website.

New laws target puppy mills and allow lifetime pet licenses

By Ashley Luck, Capital News Service

RICHMOND – Virginia soon will have three new laws that will impact its furry residents and their owners. Gov. Terry McAuliffe has signed bills that will bar pet stores from buying dogs from unscrupulous sellers, allow local governments to offer lifetime pet licenses and change the legal description of a “dangerous dog.”

McAuliffe signed the legislation last week. The bills will take effect July 1.

SB 852, introduced by Sen. William Stanley, R-Franklin, is aimed at brokers and breeders who sell dogs to pet shops. The new statute says the seller must have a valid license from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Moreover, pet stores may not procure a dog “from a person who has received citations for one critical violation or three or more noncritical violations from the USDA in the two years prior to receiving the dog,” according to a summary of the bill by the Legislative Information System.

Violating the law will be a Class 1 misdemeanor for each dog sold or offered for sale. That is punishable by up to a year in jail and a $2,500 fine.

Tabitha Treloar, director of communications at the Richmond SPCA, said the organization is grateful for the new law.

“SB 852 closed loopholes in a section of code that became law in 2015, making it clear that pet stores may not acquire pets either directly or indirectly from puppy mills,” Treloar said. “While adopting from a reputable shelter or humane society will always be the best way to get a new companion, this is a law that helps to protect Virginia customers, and we are grateful to Sen. Stanley for carrying this bill and to Gov. McAuliffe for signing it into law.”

McAuliffe also signed HB 1477, sponsored by Del. Robert Orrock, R-Caroline County. It will allow local governments to provide lifetime licenses for cats and dogs for a maximum fee of $50. (The cost of an annual pet license will remain at up to $10.)

The lifetime license will be valid if the animal’s owner continues to reside in the locality and keeps up the animal’s rabies vaccinations. If an animal’s tag is lost, destroyed or stolen, the legislation sets a $1 fee for getting a duplicate tag.

The bill also states that local ordinances can require an animal to have an identifying microchip.

Pet owners must get a license for any dog or cat that is 4 months or older. Guide dogs or service dogs that serve disabled people are exempt.

McAuliffe also signed HB 2381, sponsored by Del. Matthew Farris, R-Rustburg. It modifies the legal description of a “dangerous dog.” It’s a designation with big ramifications: If a dog is officially labeled as dangerous, it is listed in an online registry, and the owner must get insurance and pay a $150 annual fee.

Farris wanted to give a dog the benefit of the doubt if it bites a person or another animal. The bill will give animal control officers the option of determining whether a dog should be considered dangerous just because it inflicts a nip, scratch or minor injury on someone, or on another pet.

Matthew Gray, Virginia state director of the Humane Society of the United States, applauded McAuliffe for signing the bills but was disappointed that other legislation failed during the General Assembly’s 2017 session.

“We are grateful that these bills have been signed by Gov. McAuliffe, who has traditionally supported our agenda,” Gray said. “But the House of Delegates defeated nine of 11 bills that would have expanded protections for animals, including bills to protect dogs from living their lives at the end of a chainand to prevent indiscriminate euthanasia in animal shelters. That’s a dismal failure and a profound illustration of the challenge animal welfare advocates face in Virginia.”

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