Current Weather Conditions

 
Seven Day Forecast for Emporia, Virginia
 

2018-1-15

Like us on Facebook     Follow Emporia News on Twitter

Job Posting

Maintenance Worker

Job Posting #:  2018-1

Psychiatric residential treatment facility is seeking a full-time Maintenance Worker. Job duties include basic building and vehicle maintenance, performing equipment and building safety inspections, painting, plumbing, basic carpentry, electrical, & HVAC repair and installation.  Qualified candidates must possess the ability to work independently with little supervision while exhibiting quality workmanship. 

Formal experience in plumbing, electrical, carpentry, or HVAC is required.  Tradesman certification in one of the above listed trades is preferred.

Must possess the ability to frequently lift eighty pound objects.  Working conditions include work both indoors in climate controlled areas and outdoors in temperatures in excess of 90 degrees and in temperatures below 32 degrees.  Competitive pay & benefits including company sponsored 401(k) plan, health, life, dental, and vision insurance.  Post offer drug screen, physical, and criminal background screening required.  Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services is a Drug Free Work Place.  Position Open until filled.  EEO. 

Mail, fax, or e-mail cover letter and resume by February, 19, 2018 to:

Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services

Attn: Chris Thompson

Job#:  2018-1

546 Walnut Grove Drive

Jarratt, Virginia 23867

Fax: (434) 634-6237

E-mail:  careers@jacksonfeild.org

Career Opportunity

Residential Counselors

(Youth Service Workers)

If you are interested in making a positive impact on the lives of Virginia’s youth, then we want you to become part of our Team!  Rural Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facility located in Jarratt, Virginia seeks positive role models to work directly with adolescent boys and girls in a psychiatric residential treatment program.  The Youth Service Worker is responsible for role-modeling healthy behavior, teaching life skills, administering a trauma informed behavioral support program, and leading youth in and participating in social, cultural, and recreational activities.  This position supervises youth in the residential unit and on off-campus activities and appointments.

Must possess the availability to work weekends, evenings, holidays, and nights.  Supreme flexibility required.  Seeking candidates with Bachelor’s Degrees in Psychology, Sociology or other Human Services field.   Experience will be considered in lieu of a degree.

Compensation package includes 401(k) retirement plan & employer sponsored health, dental, vision & life insurance.  JBHS is a Drug Free Workplace.  Successful applicants must pass a pre-employment drug screen and criminal background screening.  EOE.  Positions open until filled.

E-mail cover letter and resume to:

Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services

Attn: Chris Thompson

Job # 2018-2

E-mail:careers@jacksonfeild.org

Career Opportunity

Melvin L. Davis Oil Company, Inc. is currently searching for Management Team Members.  We have openings from crew leaders all the way up to GM’s at various locations.  Our team has been the key to our success and growth so far and we’re looking for more people with the right skills and personality to join us.

Our Company:

The Davis family opened a small restaurant in rural Sussex County, Virginia in 1956. The entrepreneurial spirit continues today as the third generation has established two modern travel centers in Virginia, including one near the site of the original 15-employee restaurant. Today the company has expanded to more than 250 employees and serves professional drivers and traveling motorists along I-85 and I-95 in Virginia. In addition to the large, clean travel centers with food options in Stony Creek and Warfield, we also operate an Exxon service station and convenience store in Prince George, a Mobil service station and convenience store in Stony Creek, a Popeye’s, a Wendy’s and a Denny’s.  Our team has been the key to our success and growth so far and we’re looking for more people with the right skills and personality to join us.  Customer service is the foundation of our company, and it’s the job of every team member regardless of title.  Be a part of a talented team where you will be challenged each and every day.  We are a quickly growing company, and promote from within whenever possible.  Your opportunity for growth inside of our company is exciting.

Job Requirements:

•Minimum 1-3 years of leadership experience in the retail, grocery or other service industry with responsibility for financial results.

Benefits:

•Competitive Salary ranging from $28,000-$55,000.00 annually depending on experience plus 10% annual salary bonus potential paid quarterly for GM’s.

•Benefits that include a great medical package, dental insurance, vision insurance, life insurance, disability insurance and AFLAC.

•Paid Time Off.

•100% match of up to 4% of salary in the 401K plan.

•Discounts on fuel

•Discounted meals for employees on and off shift from 10% to 100% depending on position

Resumes can be sent to Jeanne Moseley at 434-246-2520 or jmoseley@dtc33.com or apply online at https://www.snagajob.com/job-search?ui=true&q=davis+travel+centers&w=23882

Virginia House End Secrecy in Committee Votes

By Adam Hamza, Capital News Service

RICHMOND – Advocates for government transparency are applauding the Virginia House of Delegates for ending its practice of allowing committees and subcommittees to kill legislation on unrecorded voice votes.

In adopting rules for the legislative session that began Wednesday, the House voted unanimously to require panels to record who votes how.

“A recorded vote of members of a committee or subcommittee shall be taken and the name and number of those voting for, against, or abstaining shall be taken upon each measure,” according to the chamber’s new rules, introduced by Del. Todd Gilbert, R-Shenandoah.

In addition to recorded votes, the new rules provide for more proportional representation on committees and require live-streaming and archiving of committee hearings.

In the past, many bills were approved or rejected at the committee and subcommittee level on voice votes alone. This made it was impossible to know which delegates voted against or for a particular bill.

Sen. Amanda Chase, R-Chesterfield, and Del. Mark Levine, D-Alexandria, who founded the Virginia Transparency Caucus, praised the rule change as a major step forward for Virginia.

“This is a victory for transparency and open government for the people of the commonwealth,” Chase said. Levine agreed.

“By having these votes recorded, members will now be responsible for all legislative actions they take. No more will bills be killed in secret without any accountability,” he said.

Megan Rhyne, executive director of the Virginia Coalition for Open Government, commended the move. After the change was announced, Rhyne wrote in an email: “Good work from the House leadership!”

Betsy Edwards, executive director of the Virginia Press Association, echoed that sentiment. “Everyone needs to know how decisions are made,” she said.

Democrats blamed Republicans for the past secrecy.

“For years, House Republicans have killed critical pieces of progressive legislation through unrecorded voice votes,” House Democratic Leader David Toscano of Charlottesville and Caucus Chair Charniele Herring of Alexandria said in a joint statement. “That era is over, and we welcome a new era of accountability and governance that is more reflective of last year’s election results.”

Democrats picked up 15 House seats in November. As a result, Republicans have only a 51-to-49 majority in that chamber.

Republican leaders acknowledged that the makeup of the House was a factor in changing the rules.

Gilbert said the new rules “reflect the new composition of the House chamber, as well as several new transparency initiatives we are proud to champion.”

Del. Ben Cline, R-Rockbridge, said he is proud that the House changed the rules.

“The work we do as public servants should always be open and accessible to an informed citizenry,” he said. “I have always advocated for recorded votes.”

Last year, Cline sponsored a bill to require recorded votes in committees and subcommittees. It died in the House Rules Committee – on an unrecorded vote.

Hundreds Celebrate Legacies of Dr. King, VUU

By George Copeland Jr., Capital News Service

RICHMOND – U.S. Rep. Donald McEachin, Gov.-elect Ralph Northam and hundreds of other people gathered Friday morning for Virginia Union University’s 40th Annual Community Leaders Breakfast, praising the school’s mission and legacy while urging Virginians toward acts of public service.

Along with figures including Gov. Terry McAuliffe, state Sen. Jennifer McClellan and Richmond Mayor Levar Stoney, the event also celebrated Martin Luther King Jr. Day, which has its 50th anniversary on Monday.

Despite the heavy rain outside the Marriott Hotel, guests were in high spirits about Virginia Union – founded in 1865 to serve newly freed slaves – and the future of the state in general. Corshai Williams, president of the VUU Student Government Association, was honored at the event, while the school’s choir performed.

“I think it’s an awesome reflection on the legacy of Martin Luther King,” said Joseph L. Lyons, associate director of career services for Virginia State University, a historically black school in Petersburg. “I think the fusion of educators and persons in the community, as well as students together will continue the dream.”

Pamela Tolson Turner, director of communications for VSU, agreed.

“I look forward to this event each year,” she said. “It’s just a wonderful opportunity to honor the legacy of such a great man, a man that stood for all.”

Former Varina High School teacher Reginald Bassette Sr. was enthusiastic about the state’s prospects in the coming year: “I think Virginia is moving forward in more ways than we know. The good things that are happening are generally overshadowed by the things that are not as positive as they could be.”

Less positive topics nonetheless found their way into the celebration through the speakers’ remarks. Among the topics was last year’s neo-Nazi rally in Charlottesville.

Northam condemned the “white supremacists” responsible for the event, which led to the death of activist Heather Heyer and two Virginia State Police officers. Northam promised support for “inclusivity and diversity” throughout the state under his administration.

McEachin made repeated references to President Donald Trump’s administration when talking about King’s philosophies and the opposition he faced.

“The trouble that we have now is because we have leaders who do not keep the needs of the people holy,” McEachin said. He listed such developments as the failed attempts to expand Medicaid in Virginia, Congress’ failure to extend funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program and passage of a federal tax bill that many believe will hurt the poor.

McEachin summarized his thoughts on the current state of the country with: “Indeed, these are troubled times.”

But the speakers and guests made an effort to keep the breakfast centered on a more positive outlook.

Accepting an MLK Lifetime of Service award from the group he helped create, the Rev. Taylor C. Millner Sr. of Morning Star Holy Church said, “This breakfast is not just about Trump. This breakfast is also reminding you that when you go out of that door at 9 o’clock, you have to live the dream. You have to fight for justice. You have to make an opportunity for everyone else. Go after the gold, but also serve somebody!”

Mr. Lyons, when asked for his thoughts on Richmond and Virginia’s place in 2018, said “I think we are survivors, I think we persevere, I think we move forward. So regardless of the climate, regardless of the political outlook, I think we’re always going to move forward and be optimistic.”

Annual Point In Time Count to Assess Homeless Population in Crater Area Community support and volunteers needed to assist with the count in multiple locations

The Crater Area Coalition on Homelessness (CACH) will conduct a census of people experiencing homelessness throughout the Crater area on Thursday, January 25, 2018, from 4:00 a.m. until 2:00pm   The Point In Time (PIT) count covers the CACH localities of Petersburg, Colonial Heights, Hopewell, Emporia, Greensville, Dinwiddie, Sussex, Price George and Surry.  CACH will collaborate with local police, departments of social services, food pantries, libraries, schools, and numerous other service providers to identify count sites.

Since 2007, the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has required Continuums of Care to conduct an annual count of sheltered and unsheltered homeless individuals.  Results of the PIT directly impact federal funding awarded to regional service providers, and provide direction for future development of services.

The PIT will not only determine how many are homeless, but who is homeless and what factors led to their homelessness.  It will include and count homeless youth and young adults.

Volunteer support is needed during the PIT to collect information on the homeless population in the Crater region, using paper survey forms to ask people about their housing situation and what services they use.  If you are aware of unsheltered sleeping sites or encampments in the community, please describe exact location in an email to esingleton@impassoc.org so that we can try to count those people.

CACH will host volunteer training on January 18, 2018 from 11:30am to 12:30pm at the Hopewell Public Library.  Refreshments will be provided. To register, please contact Erica Singleton at esingleton@impassoc.org or call 434-637-3038.  Volunteers interested in helping with this count must attend the training.

More than 400 Continuums of Care across the nation will call on volunteers to cover 3,000 cities and counties, and will report their findings to HUD.  The 2017 Point In Time Count revealed that, on a single night, 6,067 individuals in Virginia were experiencing homelessness.

Jackson-Feild Re-Accredited by the Council on Accreditation

Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services received a three=year re-accredited by the Council on Accreditation (COA).  COA is an international, independent, nonprofit, human service accrediting organization. Founded in 1977, its mission is to partner with human service organizations worldwide to improve service delivery outcomes by developing, applying, and promoting accreditation standards.

Reaccreditation is a noteworthy achievement that demonstrates that Jackson-Feild is recognized as a residential treatment provider who successfully implements high performance standards and delivers high quality services to its children. 

Accreditation provides an objective and reliable verification that instills confidence and provides credibility to Jackson-Feild’s parents, donors, board members, community partners and stakeholders. 

The accreditation process involves a detailed self-study that analyses both administrative operations and service delivery practices.  You are “measured” against national standards of best practice. The standards examine Jackson-Feild’s operations and practices to ensure they are accessible, appropriate, responsive, evidence-based and outcomes-oriented.  It confirms that services are provided by a skilled and supportive workforce and that children are treated with dignity and respect.  Accreditation is conferred on the entire organization and not just one specific program or service with the intent to inspire confidence, credibility, integrity and achievement in Jackson-Feild Homes.

Jackson-Feild submitted a comprehensive self-study in which it addressed every standard. A site team of two reviewers spent three days on campus in September interviewing board members, staff and children. They submitted their report which was reviewed by COA and granted re-accreditation.

Tricia Delano, President & CEO, noted that “This is a wonderful milestone.  A great deal of time and hard work went into this process but it is well worth the investment of time, energy and effort. I salute our dedicated staff members who made re-accreditation happen especially Tanyah Jones who coordinated accreditation efforts.

Subscribe to RSS - 2018-1-15

Emporia News

Stories on Emporianews.com are be searchable, using the box above. All new stories will be tagged with the date (format YYYY-M-D or 2013-1-1) and the names of persons, places, institutions, etc. mentioned in the article. This database feature will make it easier for those people wishing to find and re-read an article.  For anyone wishing to view previous day's pages, you may click on the "Previous Day's Pages" link in the menu at the top of the page, or search by date (YYYY-M-D format) using the box above.

Comment Policy:  When an article or poll is open for comments feel free to leave one.  Please remember to be respectful when you comment (no foul or hateful language, no racial slurs, etc) and keep our comments safe for work and children. .Comments are moderated and comments that contain explicit or hateful words will be deleted.  IP addresses are tracked for comments. 

EmporiaNews.com serves Emporia and Greensville County, Virginia and the surrounding area
and is provided as a community service by the Advertisers and Sponsors.
All material on EmporiaNews.com is copyright 2005-2016
EmporiaNews.com is powered by Drupal and based on the ThemeBrain Sirate Theme.

Submit Your Story!

Emporia News welcomes your submissions!  You may submit articles, announcements, school or sports information using the submission forms found here, or via e-mail on news@emporianews.com.  Currently, photos and advertisements will still be accepted only via e-mail, but if you have photos to go along with your submission, you will receive instructions via e-mail. If you have events to be listed on the Community Calendar, submit them here.

Contact us at news@emporianews.com
 
EmporiaNews.com is hosted as a community Service by Telpage.  Visit their website at www.telpage.net or call (434)634-5100 (NOTICE: Telpage cannot help you with questions about Emporia New nor does Teplage have any input the content of Emporia News.  Please use the e-mail address above if you have any questions, comments or concerns about the content on Emporia News.)