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2018-3-6

Free Community Event Brings Basketball Extravaganza

The Law Enforcement and Community Basketball Extravaganza is set for Saturday, April 7, 2018 from 9 a.m. until 7 p.m.  The event is FREE to the community and features a Basketball Tournament with local greats from the past and present to be held at Brunswick High School Gymnasium, Lawrenceville, Virginia.
 
A day full of basketball will also feature great music, vendors, a job fair and lots of fun for the entire family.  Teams and Tournament Schedule will be announced soon.
 
Anyone interested in being a community resource or job fair vendor contact Alfonzo Seward at Alfonzo.Seward@southside. edu or call 434-949-1092. 
 
This event is brought to you by Southside Virginia Community College, Lawrenceville Police, Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office, Brunswick County Commonwealth’s Attorney Office, Brunswick High School and McDonald's of Emporia.

Virginia Schools and Youth Groups Encouraged to Participate in Statewide Campaign to Promote Safe Teen Driving During Upcoming High-Risk Months

Virginia’s Teen Drivers Most At Risk from May through August

Salem, VA – More teen drivers in Virginia will be involved in traffic crashes between the months of May and August than any other time of the year, statistics show. To help save lives and prevent such crashes during the high-risk warm weather months, Youth of Virginia Speak Out About Traffic Safety (YOVASO) is offering a statewide safety campaign to Virginia schools and youth groups to help teens and youth develop safe driving and passenger safety behaviors. The campaign, called "Arrive Alive," focuses on the increased risk of teen driver crashes during the spring and summer months and during prom and graduation.

Arrive Alive kicks off March 19 and runs through May 4. During the campaign, students will work in peer-to-peer groups to develop programs and social media messages that influence their peers to be safer on Virginia roadways.  Middle schools will focus their campaign on how to be a safe passenger, pedestrian, and cyclist. High schools will focus on preventing such risky driver and passenger behaviors as texting and driving, speeding, driving with too many passengers, not wearing a seat belt, underage drinking and driving, and joy riding or “cruising.”

Interested schools should register for free campaign materials to promote safe driving and passenger safety behaviors at www.yovaso.org by March 16.  Registration is free and includes one of the two boxes listed below.

 

High School Campaign Box:

  • Survive the Drive Bookmarks
  • Prom/Floral Arrive Alive Card
  • What to do After a Crash Card
  • Arrive Alive Posters
  • Pledge Banner
  • Phone Wallets with a Safety Message

Middle School Campaign Box:

  • Passenger/Bike/Pedestrian Bookmarks
  • Arrive Alive Posters
  • Pledge Banner
  • “Make Safety a Point” Pencils
  • Phone Wallets with a Safety Message

 

Arrive Alive is sponsored by YOVASO and the Virginia State Police, and is funded by a grant from the Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) Highway Safety Office. In addition, grants from Allstate and State Farm will support educational incentives and materials.

For more information or to register your school or youth group for this exciting campaign, contact Casey Taylor, Program Development Coordinator at 540-375-3596 or visit yovaso.org. YOVASO is Virginia's Peer-to-Peer Education and Prevention Program for Teen Driver Safety and is a program of the Virginia State Police. Membership in YOVASO is free and open to all Virginia high schools, middle schools, and youth groups. YOVASO currently has 100 active member schools.

Monument Honoring Virginia Native Tribes Awaits Ceremony

With the Capitol in the Background, the Square's newest monument - honoring the Native American Tribes in Virginia - awaits dedication. (CNS photo by Yasmine Jumaa)

By Yasmine Jumaa, Capital News Service

RICHMOND – After years of planning and several months of construction, a monument honoring the lives, legacy and achievements of Native American tribes in Virginia has been completed and now stands on the grounds of the state Capitol.

State officials are planning a ribbon cutting for the monument on April 17.

“I think everyone who has seen it is very much in awe and approves of what has been installed,” said Del. Christopher Peace, R-Hanover, vice chairman of the Virginia Indian Commemorative Commission.

The monument, titled “Mantle,” gets its name from Powhatan’s Mantle, a deerskin cloak said to be worn by the Native American chief. Its spiral shape was inspired by the nautilus, the self-replicating living fossil. Commission member Frances Broaddus-Crutchfield said the design symbolizes the endurance of Native American tribes.

The spiral shape was inspired by the nautilus, the self-replicating living fossil. (CNS photo by Yasmine Jumaa)

“We wanted natural materials but also something that would endure, and that’s how we came up with stone,” Broaddus-Crutchfield said. “Once you get to the center of it, there’s a meditation area with an infinity pool.” Engraved on the infinity pool are the names of the rivers in Virginia that have Native American names, such as Appomattox and Nottoway.

After reviewing submissions from several artists, Broaddus-Crutchfield said the commission appointed Mohawk installation artist Alan Michelson to create “Mantle.”

“We interviewed various artists, and Alan Michelson was the one who had the concept that we thought best represented what we were aiming for, which was the walkway,” Broaddus-Crutchfield said.

Here is how Michelson described the monument on the commission’s website:

“[Mantle] requires the visitor to neither look up nor look down, but invites one to enter – from the east – and participate in it. It is not conceived as a static monument to be venerated but an active one to be experienced by moving off the everyday grid and into the American Indian circle.”

The monument, titled "Mantle," lists the state's Indian tribes. (CNS photo by Yasmine Jumaa)

“We wanted natural materials but also something that would endure, and that’s how we came up with stone,” Broaddus-Crutchfield said. “Once you get to the center of it, there’s a meditation area with an infinity pool.” Engraved on the infinity pool are the names of the rivers in Virginia that have Native American names, such as Appomattox and Nottoway.

After reviewing submissions from several artists, Broaddus-Crutchfield said the commission appointed Mohawk installation artist Alan Michelson to create “Mantle.”

“We interviewed various artists, and Alan Michelson was the one who had the concept that we thought best represented what we were aiming for, which was the walkway,” Broaddus-Crutchfield said.

Here is how Michelson described the monument on the commission’s website:

“[Mantle] requires the visitor to neither look up nor look down, but invites one to enter – from the east – and participate in it. It is not conceived as a static monument to be venerated but an active one to be experienced by moving off the everyday grid and into the American Indian circle.”

Foundation Commemorates Civil Rights Lawyer

By Sarah Danial, Capital News Service

RICHMOND – Oliver W. Hill Sr. died in 2007, but a foundation is working to preserve his legacy for social justice.

“The primary focus of the foundation has been to foster educational opportunities for young people interested in social justice,” said Ramona Taylor, the nonprofit group’s president. “The foundation has supported various programs and initiatives geared toward exposing youth to the law, legal profession and civil rights.”

The Oliver White Hill Foundation was founded in October 2000 and continues to be inspired by Hill’s desire to help the next generation of social activists. It sponsors activities such as a mentoring program, a weeklong pre-law institute and a writing assessment workshop for students in middle school and high school.

“The foundation’s short-term plans are to build a strong board and re-energize and expand programs for youth interested in the practice of law and social justice,” Taylor said.

Hill directed his own work toward the younger generation. As a civil rights lawyer, he fought tirelessly for racial integration in schools. Hill and his colleague, Spottswood W. Robinson III, represented African-American schoolchildren in Prince Edward County in their lawsuit that became part of the landmark Brown v. Board of Education school desegregation case.

Taylor hopes the foundation will motivate people to challenge all forms of inequality, just as Hill did. She quoted him as saying, “We are all human Earthlings, and we need to constantly work to overcome the artificial barriers that have been erected to create separation among groups of our fellow humans.”

Taylor worked with Hill on his autobiography, “The Big Bang: Brown v. Board of Education and Beyond,” when she was a law student at the University of Richmond in 1998. She said she was inspired by his hard work and commitment.

“Knowing what he accomplished and seeing the humble man that I had grown to know inspired and continues to inspire me,” Taylor said. “Men like Hill are not place marks in history but hallmarks.”

The foundation will host its annual Oliver Hill Day on May 4. The event, which will be held in the Oliver Hill Courts Building in downtown Richmond, recognizes community service and exposes students to prominent speakers in the fields of law and social justice.

“I believe the greatest lesson to learn is that (you should) believe in your power as a person to make the world a better place,” Taylor said. “That’s what he did, and it has given me the opportunity to try to do the same.”

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