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2019-1-28

Care Advantage Hiring Event to be Held on February 7th

Care Advantage locations, simultaneously across the Commonwealth, are hosting a Hiring Event and Job Fair on Thursday Feb, 7th from 10am-2pm.

Looking for a new job? Know someone who might need personal care at home? Learn about all our services and training opportunities in one day! Recently voted the BEST Homecare Provider by over 3000 readers of the Richmond Times-Dispatch, Care Advantage is the largest privately owned home care provider in the state of Virginia.

Since we began in 1988, we have ensured our clients have the care and support they need to remain safe, healthy, and happy in their home environment. “Care Advantage is growing and we need to hire amazing caregivers to fulfill the needs in our local communities. We hope to engage our local counties, cities and towns in the Commonwealth to let them know in these tough economic times, we are here for you. Our senior community is growing fast and they need care, we are ready to provide them with compassionate, excellent caregivers so they can age in place with dignity.” Said CEO, Tim Hanold.

Care Advantage is looking for a variety of positions in all aspects of home health care including RNs, CNAs, PCAs, LPNs, office support staff, sales support and more. Please contact your local office or stop by one of our branches to get more information.

All locations will be hosting a Career Fair & Open House on February 7, 2019 from 10a-2p. Stop by - we'd love to meet you! Or apply online today at https://careadvantageinc.applicantpro.com/jobs/. You can also engage with our facebook event: https://business.facebook.com/events/551061325362380/

Office locations include:

Alexandria, Charlottesville, Chesapeake, Colonial Heights, Emporia, Franklin, Fredericksburg, Harrisonburg, Mechanicsville, Midlothian, Newport News, Portsmouth, Richmond, Roanoke,  and Staunton, Virginia

 

 

 

 

Mary Hardin – VCU Health CMH’s New VP of Patient Care Services

Sometimes you just know what you’re going to do for a career very early on. For Mary Hardin, that job was nursing.

Mary has been named the new Vice President of Patient Care Services/ Chief Nursing Officer at VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital, replacing the retiring Ursula Butts. Mary took over for Ursula in December.

Mary comes from a family of nurses.  Her mother, Joyce Tudor, was a nurse at CMH and area doctor’s offices for years, her brother is a nurse practitioner and her aunt is a nurse. Mary was encouraged by her mom to enter the field and after helping her mom take care of her ill grandmother, Mary knew what she wanted to do.

“I entered the Brunswick- Lunenburg-Mecklenburg Practical Nursing program at CMH in September 1986,” Mary said. “While in the LPN program, CMH hired nursing students to become nursing assistants and I was hired May 1987 as a nursing assistant on Lower West, aka Skilled Care.”

Mary was a Licensed Practical Nurse after graduating from the CMH program in 1987 – the program’s 25th class.  Her mother graduated from the very first class. Mary started her additional educational road to becoming a registered nurse in 1989 with Barton College. Mary has a master’s degree in nursing from Walden University.

Mary was born at the original CMH and is from Bracey, VA. She attended LaCrosse Elementary and then Park View Junior and Senior High Schools.

She has held quite a few jobs at CMH through the years. She was a nursing assistant on Lower West for five months and once she graduated as an LPN, she worked five years on West, before earning her Bachelor’s Degree in 1992. Mary has been a charge nurse, team leader and a staff nurse through the years, as well as patient care coordinator, nursing supervisor for two years, education coordinator for three years and for the past 20 years, she was the Director of Oncology at the Hendrick Cancer & Rehab Center. Mary even found time to be an adjunct nursing instructor at Southside Virginia Community College for two years. Hard work has never bothered Mary.

Mary’s varied experience at CMH made her an ideal candidate for the Vice President of Patient Care Services.

“We had several qualified candidates for this position, but Mary’s vast experience, demonstrated leadership attributes and the respect she garnered from her co-workers and colleagues made her stand out as our top choice,” said W. Scott Burnette, CEO of VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital.

Mary has a message for the citizens of Southside Virginia and Northern North Carolina. “I want the citizens of the community to be able to trust in our care.”  She continued, VCU Health CMH’s nursing mission is to  “deliver safe, effective care that produces outcomes in a manner that allows nurses to leave at the end of the day proud of what they have accomplished, knowing their care has made a difference.”

And making a difference is very important to Mary Hardin.

“I can make a difference in serving our patients and families, by inspiring and engaging team members by operating with transparency to sustain our culture of excellence in care,” she said.

Mary’s management style is that of a servant leader. “I want to be a role model as a leader,” she added.

Mary feels her last 20 years at CMH have helped prepare her to be an empathetic leader. “I have learned such valuable lessons about life from the oncology patients and their families.  They keep me humble to know life is precious and how important people and relationships are to us.  I have also learned throughout my journey in oncology how important spirituality and faith is for me and for others,” she said.

There is an adage in health care that the only constant is change, and Mary can cite many examples of change in her career.

“When I entered into nursing, I wore white uniforms and a cap.  However, it was short lived and transitioned to colored uniforms by 1992.  Wearing gloves to bathe a patient was considered offensive to a patient and of course now our nurses wear gloves for most patient interactions.  So much has changed in 30 years as patients have shorter lengths of stays and the focus is now more on the patient experience,” she added.

Mary foresees many challenges and changes moving forward as well with reduced government reimbursements, staffing challenges and addressing the nationwide shortage of nurses.

But one thing is clear, Mary Hardin is ready to face those challenges with a smile and a kind word.

Mary has been married to Jimmy for the past 26 years and they have twins, Jon and JoBeth. She will be gaining a daughter-in-law this June. In her spare time, Mary enjoys singing and dancing, although she claims not to be a good dancer – just a dancer who enjoys dancing. She’s an active member of South Hill United Methodist, where she is in the choir and leads the children’s music ministry and helps with a teen Bible study.

Virginia Legislators Consider Letting Governors Seek Re-election

 

By Rosemarie O’Connor, Capital News Service

RICHMOND — Virginia is the only state where a governor cannot serve two consecutive terms. But if voters think their governor is doing a good job, why shouldn’t he or she be re-elected?

Democrats, who have won the past two gubernatorial elections, generally support allowing governors to succeed themselves. Republicans generally oppose it. Political experts say Virginia’s one-term policy for governors is rooted in history.

Del. Dawn Adams, D-Richmond, called the policy, which is enshrined in the Virginia Constitution, a “detriment to the commonwealth.” She is sponsoring House Joint Resolution 608, which would let governors elected after 2021 serve two terms in a row.

“Now is the time we should look to pass a constitutional amendment for consecutive but limited governor terms,” she said.

Last week, the Senate defeated an identical amendment, Senate Joint Resolution 250, on an 18-22 vote. Fifteen Democrats and three Republicans voted for the measure, and 18 Republicans and four Democrats voted against it.

On Monday, Adams’ resolution is scheduled for a vote by a subcommittee of the House Privileges and Elections Committee. The panel also plans to consider HJ 627, an identical proposal by Del. Mark Levine, D-Arlington.

Similar resolutions have been introduced since 2013 in the General Assembly but have never made it out of committee — which is why supporters were happy that SJ 250 even made it to the Senate floor. They say limiting the governor to one term doesn’t make sense given that Virginia operates on a two-year state budget.

Senate Majority Leader Thomas Norment, a Republican from James City County, voted against the amendment. In urging his colleagues to do the same, he mentioned two past governors — Democrat Terry McAuliffe and Republican Jim Gilmore — whom he wouldn’t have wanted in office for more than four years.

“I would very succinctly and ecumenically say two words: Gilmore and McAuliffe,” Norment said, drawing laughter from some fellow legislators.

Norment said the term restriction balances the governor’s executive power to amend and veto bills, appoint officials and order a special legislative session.

Supporters of amending the constitution compare term limits on the governor to a business that gets a new boss every four years.

“What real challenge can any company overcome when its leader is but a blip on the trajectory of an employee’s career?” Adams asked.

Under Virginia’s biennial budget system, each new governor begins under the predecessor’s budget. The governor must wait until the second legislative session before proposing a budget that covers the second and third years in office. In the fourth year, the governor submits a plan for another two-year budget that a successor might or might not endorse but has little power to change.

Adams said the lack of continuity in leadership has led to “inefficiency, waste, duplication of services, low morale and low productivity.”

Opponents of changing the constitution note that while governors cannot seek re-election, they can still serve nonconsecutive terms. However, only one governor has done that since the Civil War. Mills Godwin Jr. was elected as a Democrat in 1965 and again as a Republican in 1973.

Virginia’s prohibition on governors serving consecutive terms has survived more than 160 years. Virginians did not directly elect their governor until 1851, according to the Encyclopedia of Virginia. Before that, the state constitution held the General Assembly responsible for choosing a governor.

Virginia’s anxiety over a powerful executive branch has roots in the American Revolution. The first Constitution of Virginia was enacted in conjunction with the Declaration of Independence. After declaring war on one king, Virginia was not eager to create another in the form of a powerful governor.

Matt Pinsker, a professor of constitutional law at Virginia Commonwealth University, said it all comes down to “tradition.” He said that although Virginia’s current system is “a unique anomaly among the states,” he believes it provides a well-functioning government.

Pinsker said that even if the amendment passes, it would likely make little difference in the day-to-day operations of Virginia government or the policies being pushed by the governor’s office.

That is because Virginia’s governors have typically used the position as a stepping stone for higher office, Pinsker said. Both of Virginia’s U.S. senators — Mark Warner and Tim Kaine — first served as governors.

“Our historical ties do have an impact,” said Robyn Diehl McDougle, director of the Center for Public Policy at VCU’s Wilder School of Government and Public Affairs.

McDougle said the General Assembly is reluctant to give up power to the executive branch, especially when partisan politics come into play.

“If I’m in the party opposite of who’s in the Governor’s Mansion, I’m less likely to vote for the possibility of their re-election,” she said.

Republicans control both the House and Senate, and Gov. Ralph Northam is a Democrat. Of the dozen legislators sponsoring HJ 608 and HJ 672, just one is a Republican: Del. Mark L. Cole of Fredericksburg. That could spell trouble for those measures to make it out of committee.

“I’m not saying it’s impossible,” McDougle said, “but I am saying it is an uphill battle.”

Panel OKs Bill Seeking Data on Solitary Confinement

By Saffeya Ahmed, Capital News Service

RICHMOND — A House committee voted unanimously Friday to require reports on solitary confinement in prisons across Virginia.

House Bill 1642 would require the Virginia Department of Corrections to submit semiannual reports to the General Assembly and governor detailing the DOC’s use of solitary confinement.

The House Committee on Militia, Police and Public Safety approved the bill, 21-0. The panel sent the measure to the House Appropriation Committee for a look at its financial impact before it goes to the House floor.

Also referred to as “restrictive housing,” solitary confinement is defined as isolation in a cell for 22-24 hours of the day with little to no human interaction. The DOC does not currently report statistics on the number of inmates held in restrictive housing.

Sponsored by Del. Patrick Hope, D-Arlington, the legislation would provide the state legislature and governor statistics on the department’s use of restrictive housing in correctional facilities. The information would also be posted online.

The semiannual report would include:

  • Demographics such as age, race, ethnicity and status of mental health
  • The average daily population held in restrictive housing
  • The number of offenders placed in and released from restrictive housing
  • Documentation of self-harm and suicide incidents or attempts
  • The number of days each offender spent in confinement
  • The number of full-time mental health staff

The American Civil Liberties Union of Virginia called on Gov. Ralph Northam in May to ban solitary confinement and limit its use to rare and exceptional cases. The ACLU said inmates should remain in restrictive housing for no more than 15 consecutive days, which aligns with international human rights standards. Currently, Virginia inmates placed in restrictive housing spend an average of 2.7 years in confinement, according to a 2018 ACLU report.

Nationally, about 88,000 inmates — or approximately 5 percent of all prisoners — are held in solitary confinement, according to a study done at Yale Law School.

Virginia has implemented reforms for restrictive housing before. The number of inmates held in solitary confinement at Red Onion — a maximum-security prison in Wise County — dropped 85 percent in the last decade. The facility, known for its use of restrictive housing, currently houses about 70 inmates in solitary confinement compared to 500 at the start of the decade, according to a Washington Post article.

The House Appropriations Committee could address HB 1642 as soon as Monday.

In the Senate, two Fairfax Democrats have offered similar legislation. Sen. David Marsden has proposed SB 1085, and Sen. Richard Saslaw has filed SB 1777.

On Friday, the Senate Rehabilitation and Social Services Committee folded Marsden’s bill into Saslaw’s and then unanimously approved SB 1077.

Panel Wants Prisons to Modify Tampon Ban

By Saffeya Ahmed, Capital News Service

RICHMOND — The Virginia Department of Corrections would have to modify its official but unenforced policy of barring women from wearing feminine hygiene products when they visit a state prison, under a bill approved Friday by a House committee.

The House Militia, Police and Public Safety Committee voted 19-1 in favor of House Bill 1884 and sent the legislation to the full House of Delegates for approval next week.

HB 1884 would require the DOC to modify the policy it announced in September for visitors wearing menstrual cups and tampons.

The rule banned the feminine products in an attempt to prevent people from smuggling contraband into facilities.

“If someone chooses to visit a Virginia Department of Corrections inmate, he or she cannot have anything hidden inside a body cavity,” a DOC spokeswoman told the Richmond Times-Dispatch at the time. “There have been many instances in which visitors have attempted to smuggle drugs into our prisons by concealing those drugs in a body cavity, including the vagina.”

Soon after the announcement, Brian Moran, Virginia’s secretary of public safety and homeland security, suspended the policy until further review.

The bill, sponsored by Del. Mark Keam, D-Fairfax, would require the DOC to rewrite the restrictions. As amended by the committee, the measure would require the DOC to:

  • Notify visitors about the policy prohibiting menstrual cups and tampons ahead of their visit.
  • Provide visitors the option of removing any prohibited menstrual product and replacing it with a state-issued one in order to have a contact visit with an inmate.
  • Allow visitors who do not want to remove prohibited menstrual products the option of a no-contact visit with an inmate.
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