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2019-2-8

ATTN: GREENSVILLE COUNTY TAXPAYERS

Greensville County Business, Professional and Occupational Licenses for 2019 are now due.  To avoid penalties, please secure your 2019 license from the Commissioner of the Revenue’s Office on or before March 1st.  We are located in the Greensville County Government Building at 1781 Greensville County Circle, Rm 132 on Highway 301 North – Sussex Drive.  Our office hours are from 8 to 5 Monday thru Friday.


Martha S. Swenson
Master Commissioner of the Revenue
Greensville County, Virginia

Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center Announces 2018 Employee & Managers of the Year

Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center Announces 2018 Employee & Managers of the Year

Emporia, VA – Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center (SVRMC) has named its 2018 Employee and Managers of the Year. Employees and managers are nominated for these awards by their colleagues based on their commitment to patient care, their professionalism, and their contributions on the job. The recognitions are the highest honors hospital employees can receive.

Employee of the Year

Laboratory Supervisor, Vickie Michael, MT has been employed at SVRMC since May 1978. Ms. Michael assists the Medical Director and the Administrative Director with management and policy implementation for the operations of the Lab. She is instrumental to our successful Joint Commission Surveys.  Her colleagues had the following to say about her: “Vickie is well respected by her co-workers. She has a wealth of knowledge and always ensures quality laboratory testing.  Vickie has a strong commitment to her co-workers and a sense of ownership that is demonstrated by her quality of work. We are lucky to have Vickie on our team.”

Clinical Manager of the Year

Pamela Low, Director of Imaging, has been employed at SVRMC since September 1974.  She is responsible for the daily activities of the imaging department, including staffing and budgeting. Ms. Low’s co-workers had the following to say about her: “Pam is respected by all at SVRMC, including her peers, physicians and staff. She displays great customer service skills and has a unique ability for service recovery.  She makes sure that her department aligns with the goals for our hospital and she puts the patients first during every encounter.  She often volunteers at community events; representing the facility and being a champion for SVRMC and the services we provide.”

Non-Clinical Manager of the Year

Dexter Arrington, Finance Controller, has been employed at SVRMC since December 2013.He is responsible for all accounting, budgetary and financial planning activities of the hospital, supervising the accounting department, and assisting the CFO. Mr. Arrington’s co-workers had the following to say about him: “Dexter has proven himself to be effective and instrumental within the finance and accounting operations of our facility. He continually maintains a positive attitude, takes on any challenge presented to him, has an impeccable work ethic, and maintains a high level of professionalism with everyone that he interacts with or supports. Dexter is well respected by his peers and by facility leadership.”

Virginia Moves to Raise Age to Buy Tobacco Products

By Serena Fischer, Capital News Service

RICHMOND — Legislation making its way through the General Assembly would raise the legal age for purchasing and possessing tobacco and vaping products from 18 to 21, drawing mixed reactions from young adults who would be affected by the new law.

The House and Senate have passed similar bills to increase the age to buy or possess products containing tobacco or nicotine. Each chamber is now working on the other’s measure.

In the state that gave birth to the tobacco industry, not everybody is happy about the legislation. William Bechtle, a 20-year-old computer science major at Virginia Commonwealth University, believes it would infringe on people’s rights.

“If an 18-year-old who is legally an adult wants to make the horrible choice to start smoking, they have that right,” said Bechtle, who smokes cigarettes. “If they don’t, then why is the age of adulthood 18 and not 21?”

Other young smokers do not seem to view the bills as a threat — only as an inconvenience.

“I can get older friends, people at that age limit, to get it for me,” said Katie Breighner, a freshman at Centreville High School in Fairfax County. “Regardless of your age, someone can find a way to get it.”

Some lawmakers also oppose the proposals to raise the smoking age — but apparently not enough to derail the legislation.

On Tuesday, the House voted 67-31 in favor of its bill, HB 2748. That measure has been referred to the Senate Courts of Justice Committee.

The Senate passed its bill, SB 1727, on a 32-8 vote on Jan. 29. On Wednesday, the House Courts of Justice Committee approved that measure, 9-6, and sent it to the full House for consideration.

If the legislation becomes law, Virginia would join six other states in raising the tobacco purchase age to 21.

The Senate bill was sponsored by Sen. Thomas Norment, R-James City. Thirteen Republicans and all 19 Democrats in the Senate supported the measure; eight Republican senators opposed it.

The House bill was introduced by Del. Christopher P. Stolle, R-Virginia Beach. Forty-six Democrats and 21 Republicans voted in favor of the bill, while 29 Republican delegates and two Democratic delegates voted against it.

Among the opponents was Del. Mark Cole, R-Spotsylvania.

“I have no problem with raising the age to purchase tobacco products up to 21, but I think it should be done in a step process, because there are, whether we like it or not, 18-, 19-, 20-year-olds who are using these products now,” Cole said. “While I applaud the intent of this legislation, I think it has problems.”

The legislation targets all tobacco and nicotine products, not just cigarettes. A primary goal is to combat the recent trend of teen vaping, which the U.S. surgeon general has called an “epidemic.”

The number of teens who have vaped in the past 30 days has almost doubled since 2017, including children as young as eighth grade. While some may argue that vaping is healthier than smoking cigarettes, many are unaware that one Juul pod (a popular method of vaping) contains as much nicotine as 20 cigarettes.

That’s why students like Reem Alul view the legislation before the General Assembly as a sign of progress. Alul, a biology major at VCU, hopes new laws will help curb youth addiction to nicotine.

“As someone who’s been smoking for over a year now, I know how addictive and toxic nicotine is to my quality of life,” Alul said. “Although minors will still have access to these products, it’ll be much harder to get a hold of it on short notice.”

How they voted

Here is how the House voted Tuesday on HB 2748 (Tobacco products, nicotine vapor products, etc.; purchase, possession, and sale).

Floor: 02/05/19 House: VOTE: PASSAGE (67-Y 31-N 1-A)

YEAS — Adams, D.M., Aird, Austin, Ayala, Bagby, Bell, John J., Bourne, Carr, Carroll Foy, Convirs-Fowler, Davis, Delaney, Filler-Corn, Fowler, Garrett, Gooditis, Guzman, Hayes, Helsel, Heretick, Herring, Hodges, Hope, Hugo, Hurst, Ingram, James, Jones, J.C., Jones, S.C., Keam, Knight, Kory, Krizek, Landes, Leftwich, Levine, Lindsey, Lopez, Marshall, McQuinn, Miyares, Mullin, Murphy, Orrock, Peace, Plum, Pogge, Price, Rasoul, Reid, Robinson, Rodman, Roem, Sickles, Simon, Stolle, Sullivan, Torian, Toscano, Tran, Turpin, Tyler, VanValkenburg, Ward, Watts, Yancey, Mr. Speaker — 67.

NAYS — Adams, L.R., Bell, Richard P., Bell, Robert B., Bloxom, Brewer, Bulova, Byron, Campbell, J.L., Campbell, R.R., Carter, Cole, Edmunds, Fariss, Freitas, Gilbert, Head, Kilgore, LaRock, McGuire, McNamara, Morefield, O'Quinn, Pillion, Poindexter, Ransone, Rush, Thomas, Ware, Webert, Wilt, Wright — 31.

ABSTENTIONS — Collins — 1.

Here is how the Senate voted on Jan. 29 on SB 1727 (Tobacco products, nicotine vapor products, etc.; purchase, possession, and sale).

Floor: 01/29/19 Senate: Read third time and passed Senate (32-Y 8-N)

YEAS — Barker, Black, Boysko, Chafin, Cosgrove, Dance, Deeds, Dunnavant, Ebbin, Edwards, Favola, Hanger, Howell, Lewis, Locke, Lucas, Marsden, Mason, McClellan, McPike, Newman, Norment, Obenshain, Petersen, Reeves, Ruff, Saslaw, Spruill, Sturtevant, Surovell, Vogel, Wagner — 32.

NAYS — Carrico, Chase, DeSteph, McDougle, Peake, Stanley, Stuart, Suetterlein — 8.

Here is the House Courts of Justice Committee voted Wednesday on SB 1727 (Tobacco products, nicotine vapor products, etc.; purchase, possession, and sale).

02/06/19 House: Reported from Courts of Justice with substitute (9-Y 6-N)

YEAS — Leftwich, Miyares, Watts, Toscano, Herring, Mullin, Bourne, Simon, Carroll Foy — 9.

NAYS — Bell, Robert B., Gilbert, Adams, L.R., Campbell, J.L., Ransone, Campbell, R.R. — 6.

ABSTENTIONS — Collins — 1.

NOT VOTING — Kilgore, Hope — 2.

Hundreds of Anti-abortion Activists Rally at Virginia Capitol

By Andrew Gionfriddo, Capital News Service

RICHMOND — Among a sea of strollers and picket signs on the grounds of the Virginia Capitol, hundreds of people demonstrated Thursday against abortion — and especially against Democratic proposals to ease restrictions on late-term abortions.

Activists filled the landing of the Capitol steps, flooding down the hill towards Bank Street. Signs declaring “Equal rights for pre-born people” and other anti-abortion slogans poked out of the crowd as children played and their parents watched.

The Commonwealth for Life: March on Richmond featured General Assembly members, anti-abortion activists and representatives of Christian organizations. Chris and Diana Shores organized the rally in just a week after legislation sponsored by Del. Kathy Tran, D-Fairfax, came into the national spotlight.

Questioned by a Republican about her bill, Tran said it technically would allow a woman about to give birth to have an abortion. After critics accused her of endorsing infanticide, Tran said she misspoke. However, conservative commentators — including President Donald Trump in Tuesday’s State of the Union address — slammed Tran, Gov. Ralph Northam and other Virginia Democrats for supporting the measure.

Chris Shores said he and his wife have been in the political arena for years. When news of Tran’s bill broke, they received a slew of calls asking them what they were going to do about it.

“We threw up a Facebook post last week, and within 24 to 48 hours, we had hundreds of people interested in the post,” Shores said. “It was truly organic.”

The rally was the first time the couple has put on an event of this scale. Speakers included Republican Sens. Dick Black of Loudoun County and Bill Stanley of Franklin County; Del. Nick Freitas, R-Culpeper; and E.W. Jackson, a Protestant minister and lawyer who was the Republican nominee for lieutenant governor in 2013.

While the event featured Republican figures and Christian leaders, Chris Shores said the aim of the March on Richmond was outside party and religious lines.

“I didn’t want this to become a Republican pep rally. That wasn’t the point of the event,” he said.

A central theme to the event was denouncing Tran’s proposal, HB 2491. The bill was tabled by a subcommittee and is dead for this legislative session.

Northam, a pediatric neurologist, came under fire from anti-abortion groups after defending the bill on a radio show on Jan. 30. Northam said third-trimester abortions are done “in cases where there may be severe deformities. There may be a fetus that’s non-viable.”

In such instances, the governor said, “The infant would be delivered. The infant would be kept comfortable. The infant would be resuscitated if that’s what the mother and the family desired, and then a discussion would ensue between the physicians and the mother.”

Jackson excoriated Northam for that comment.

“Anybody who is prepared to allow a child to die after that child has been born alive does not deserve to be called a pediatrician,” Jackson said. “He doesn’t deserve to be called a governor either.”

Other speeches at the rally criticized efforts in Virginia to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

Black, who has opposed abortion in the General Assembly for the past 20 years, said the ERA would be a blow to the anti-abortion movement.

“The ERA is a method that the abortionists want to use,” he said. “If that gets into the Constitution, we will not have any chance to roll back abortion.”

After Trump mentioned the controversy over abortion in Virginia in his nationally televised speech this week, Chris Shores hopes the conversation doesn’t stop.

“We’re going to continue to mobilize and organize and call on pro-life Virginia to stand up,” he said.

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