2020-5-19

Quarantine Recipe: Homemade Pizza with Your Kids

Cooking with your kids can be a great way to connect with them and help reduce their screen time during this quarantine. This is not so  much a recipe as an activity outiline. It will probably be best to work at the kitchen table.

Mom and Dad will need to do some of the work ahead, like cuting up the vegetables and cooking the sausage, unless there are some older kids in your house that you can trust with a knife or using the stove. Remember to preheat the oven to 450 degrees f for the Pita or Naan and follow the directions for the premade crusts and dough.

This plan is also very forgiving of changes. just plan on one mini crust per person, or one-quarter to one-third of the ready-made dough per person. If you have a lot of smaller people, you can also find Mini Naan or use English Muffins that should satisfy their appitites.

Ingredients:

4 each Pita Bread, Naan Bread, Mini Ready Made Pizza Crusts (check Dollar Tree for Thin and Crispy Crusts) or Ready Made Pizza Dough

1 or 2 Jars Ready Made Pizza Sauce

1 bag Shredded Mozzarella Cheeze (size depends on how much cheeze your family likes on their pizzas)

Grated Parmesan Cheese

Assorted Pizza Toppings (get whatever your family likes: Pepperoni, Sausage, Onions, Green Peppers, Broccoli, Mushrooms, etc.)

Difficulty: Easy. Shopping Needed for Average Household: Pizza Sauce, Crusts and Assorted Toppings.

Pre-planning needed: None.

Prep Time: 20 Minutes, Cook Time: 15-25 Minutes

Yield: 4 Servings

1.  Let each one of your kids and adults have a crust to work on, If you are using the ready made dough, let each person, young or young-at-heart, have a portion to roll out themselves, and top each rolled out portion with a bit of the pizza sauce. Don't use too much sauce or the pizza might get soggy.

2.  Let everyone top the sauce with some Mozzarella and Parmesan cheese.

3.  Everyone gets to top their own pizza, with a bit of adult supervision. Too many toppings will prevent the ready-made pizza dough from baking right and there will be raw spots of dough in the finished pizza and unmelted cheese on the Pita, Naan, or pre-baked crusts. Too many toppings will also be hard for smaller children to finish eating.

4.  Line a baking sheet or two with parchment paper and transfer everyone's creations to it. Use a Sharpie to write the name of the Pizza Artist next to their creation (about an inch away with an arrow pointing to it) so that everyone gets the right pizza). Bake for 15-25 minutes until the cheese is melted and bubbly and the crust is cooked to the desired crispiness. Have everyone help in the cleanup and setting of the table while the pizzas bake.

5.  Let the pizzas sit for a few minutes before cutting and serving. A side salad from a bagged mix with a few cucumbers and tomatoes is all you need to complete the meal.

To submit your own recipe, send it to news@emporianews.com. Recipes may be for any meal or any course. While you may include your own reccomendations for side dishes and wine, please remember to include a brief introduction to the recipe (which I have left off of this first one). This paragraph or two can eplain to readers where you first had the dish, or if it is a family tradition and a favorite of a certain family member. You may also relate any happy memories related to your recipe-is it your annual birthday meal? Reader submitted recipes will be credited to the reader, and you may include a photograph if you like. If your recipe is from a cookbook or website, please send the publication information for attribution.

Senior Alert: MICHAEL LEONARD DELANEY

 

 

SENIOR ALERT

 

MICHAEL LEONARD DELANEY

 

Age: 75 YEARS

Sex: MALE

Race: WHITE

Hair: GREY/WHITE

Eyes: BLUE

Height: 6’ 3”

Weight: 175-180 POUNDS

Missing From: FAIRFAX COUNTY, Virginia

Missing Since: MAY 10TH, 2020

THE VIRGINIA STATE POLICE HAS ISSUED A SENIOR ALERT ON BEHALF OF FAIRFAX COUNTY POLICE DEPARTMENT ON MAY 18th, 2020 AT 1900 HOURS.

THE FAIRFAX COUNTY POLICE DEPARTMENT IS LOOKING FOR MICHAEL LEONARD DELANEY, RACE: WHITE, SEX: MALE, AGE 75 YEARS OLD, HEIGHT 6’ 3”, WEIGHT 175-180 lbs., WITH BLUE EYES AND GREY/WHITE HAIR.  HE WAS LAST SEEN ON MAY 10th, 2020, AT 2102 HOURS WHEN HE WAS RECORDED ON SURVEILLANCE CAMERAS DEPARTING RESTON HOSPITAL-DOOR G.  HE WAS ADMITTED FOR A FALL AND A POSSIBLE STROKE.  HE WAS LAST SEEN WEARING A BLACK JACKET OVER A YELLOW HOSPITAL GOWN, DARK SHOES WITH WHITE SOLES, AND DARK FRAME EYEGLASSES WITH A STRAP.  HE IS POSSIBLY WEARING HIS WEDDING BAND, HIS HIGH SCHOOL GEM RING, AND A BLACK WRISTWATCH.

THE MISSING SENIOR SUFFERS FROM A COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT AND THE DISAPPEARANCE POSES A CREDIBLE THREAT TO HIS HEALTH AND SAFETY AS DETERMINED BY THE INVESTIGATING AGENCY.

Governor Northam Announces Education Work Group to Help Guide Process for Safe, Equitable Reopening of Schools

Education stakeholders will develop recommendations to ensure continuity of learning and address the needs of all Virginia students

RICHMOND—Governor Ralph Northam today announced a diverse set of education stakeholders participating in the Commonwealth’s COVID-19 Education Work Group to help chart a path forward for determining how schools can safely reopen later this year.

The group is comprised of representatives from Virginia’s public and private early childhood, K-12, and higher education systems, and includes teachers, superintendents, parents, college presidents, state agency personnel, special education advocates, museum directors, and student perspectives. This wide variety of education stakeholders represent the whole of Virginia’s education system and come from every region of the Commonwealth.

Secretary of Education Atif Qarni formed the work group and chaired its first meeting on April 23. Since then, the work group has been focused on developing recommendations to align policies throughout the Commonwealth’s preK-20 education system and ensure continuity of learning.

“I am deeply grateful for Virginia’s educators, administrators, school nutrition workers, support staff, parents, and students for the ways they have adapted to new learning environments over the past two months,” said Governor Northam. “As we make decisions about the path forward, this panel will help ensure that we are best supporting rural students, English language learners, students of color, and students with special needs. School closures have been necessary to protect health and safety, but lost class time has a disproportionate impact on Virginia’s most vulnerable and economically disadvantaged students. That’s why equity will remain at the forefront as we determine when and how we can safely and responsibly return to in-person learning.”

The work group is chaired by Secretary of Education Atif Qarni, and is staffed by Deputy Secretary Education Fran Bradford, State Council of Higher Education Director Peter Blake, and State Superintendent of Public Instruction Dr. James Lane. These four individuals comprise the steering committee for the COVID-19 Education Work Group.

“As we begin to think about how Virginia’s education system can operate in the summer and fall, it is crucial that we have the advice of a diverse, thoughtful group of education leaders,” said Secretary of Education Atif Qarni. “This group will use their expertise to guide our approach and help ensure that all voices are heard and all recommendations are made through the lens of equity.”

Members of Virginia’s COVID-19 Education Work Group include:

Steering Committee

  • Atif Qarni, Secretary of Education, Chair of COVID-19 Education Work Group  
  • Fran Bradford, Deputy Secretary of Education for Higher Education and Museums
  • Peter Blake, Director, State Council of Higher Education for Virginia
  • Dr. James Lane, Superintendent of Public Instruction, Virginia Department of Education
     

Work Group Members

  • Jenna Conway, Chief School Readiness Officer, Office of the Governor
  • Holly Coy, Assistant Superintendent for Policy, Communications, and Equity, Virginia Department of Education
  • Dr. Laurie Forlano, Deputy Commissioner for Population Health, Virginia Department of Health
  • Jennifer O. Macdonald, Director, Division of Child and Family Health, Virginia Department of Health
  • Dr. Lynn Clayton Prince, Director of Special Education, Powhatan County Public Schools and President-Elect, Virginia Council of Administrators of Special Education
  • Pam Simms, Program Director, Gladys H. Oberle School
  • Dr. Donna Henry, Chancellor, University of Virginia’s College at Wise and Chair, Council of Presidents in Virginia
  • Dr. Michael Rao, President, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Taylor Reveley, President, Longwood University
  • Dr. Makola Abdullah, President, Virginia State University
  • Dr. Sharon Morrissey, Senior Vice Chancellor, Virginia Community College System
  • Dr. John Downey, President, Blue Ridge Community College
  • Dr. Eric Williams, Superintendent, Loudoun County Public Schools
  • Dr. Jared Cotton, Superintendent, Chesapeake Public Schools
  • Dr. Dennis Carter, Superintendent, Smyth County Schools
  • Kathy Burcher, Representative, Virginia Education Association   
  • Melinda Bright, Representative, Virginia Education Association
  • Dr. Travis Burns, Principal, Northumberland High School and President, Virginia Association of Secondary School Principals
  • Dr. Andrew Buchheit, Principal, T. Clay Wood Elementary School and President, Virginia Association of Elementary School Principals
  • Ann-Marie Ward, Council Treasurer, Virginia Parent Teacher Association
  • Pamela Croom, President-Elect, Virginia Parent Teacher Association
  • Teddy Martin II, Member, Henry County School Board and Regional Chair, Virginia School Boards Association
  • Karen Corbett-Sanders, Chair, Fairfax County School Board
  • Grace Creasey, Executive Director, Virginia Council for Private Education
  • Robert Lambeth, President, Council of Independent Colleges in Virginia
  • Dr. Larry Stimpert, President, Hampden-Sydney College
  • Dr. Tiffany Franks, President, Averett University
  • Dan Gecker, President, Virginia Board of Education
  • Marianne Radcliff, Representative, State Council of Higher Education for Virginia
  • Jared Calfee, Executive Director, Virginia21          
  • Rich Conti, Director, Science Museum of Virginia
  • Dr. Betty Adams, Executive Director, Southern Virginia Higher Education Center
  • Ingrid Grant, Member, Governor’s African American Advisory Board
  • Hyun Lee, Member, Governor’s Asian Advisory Board
  • Diana Brown, Member, Governor’s Latino Advisory Board
  • Ashley Marshall, Chair, Virginia Council on Women
  • Shan Lateef, Rising Senior, Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology and Governor’s STEM Phenom Award Winner
     

On March 13, Governor Northam directed all K-12 schools in Virginia to close for a minimum of two weeks in response to the spread of COVID-19. On March 23, Governor Northam was one of the first governors in the country to issue a statewide order closing schools for the remainder of the academic year. The Virginia Department of Education established the Continuity for Learning (C4L) Task Force consisting of more than 120 teachers, leaders, and collaborating educational partners across Virginia to help school divisions to develop and implement continuous learning plans in partnership with local county health departments, families, staff, and local boards of education.

Virginia’s COVID-19 Education Work Group will develop recommendations on key issues schools must address before reopening and help determine how to ensure continuity of learning for Virginia students from cradle to classroom to career. After this guidance is developed, the work group will transition to focus on long-term recovery plans to include addressing learning gaps and social emotional needs of students resulting from school closures.

In the coming weeks, Governor Northam will outline a roadmap for Virginia schools, colleges, and universities to return to in-person learning in a safe, equitable, and responsible manner. The data-driven and science-based approach will include recommendations from the COVID-19 Education Work Group, and will be coordinated with the Forward Virginia plan to gradually ease public health restrictions. The Forward Virginia plan is grounded in federal CDC guidelines, and includes specific goals to contain the spread of the virus through increased testing, contact tracing, and ensuring adequate medical capacity.

May 2020 Update from Congressman McEachin

As I write this, we have entered the second month of the COVID-19 pandemic, and the second month of Governor Northam’s stay-at-home order. Most of us are tired of being at home, tired of being separated from family and friends and frightened of both the virus and the cratering economy.

 In compliance with both state orders and orders in the District of Columbia, my offices are closed, but we are all working remotely.  We are here for you and eager to help.  If you have an issue or a problem with a federal agency, such as a missing tax return, needing a visa or passport, unreceived benefits or issues with mail delivery, my office is happy to help. Just go to my website, mceachin.house.gov, to get started. We are also happy to record your opinion on any news topic.

This past month, while I could not physically be out and around the district, I have hosted several virtual events to inform and assist constituents. We had a roundtable with small business owners to hear directly from them about their concerns and needs. I also had a tele-town hall with experts such a Small Business Association representative, the governor’s workforce development head and Dr. Carey, the Virginia Secretary of Health and Human Services, to help with any and all coronavirus concerns. If you have further questions, feel free to post them on twitter and I will get you answers.

This past week I held a town hall about at home schooling. I know many parents are struggling with this new responsibility and children are struggling with distance learning over the internet. We were fortunate to be joined by Atif Qarni, the Virginia Secretary of Education, Jason Kamras, Richmond Superintendent of Schools and several prominent teachers including Rodney Robinson, former Richmond teacher and national Teacher of the Year.

As this pandemic continues, we are all becoming increasingly aware and appreciative of our frontline and essential workers and the critical jobs they do. Healthcare workers, grocery store employees, farmers, food processing workers, senior center staff, trash collectors, mail delivery persons and many more keep us going in these difficult times.  We thank them and honor their service.

But I know there are many more folks here in our district who are working hard to make a difference, to pay it forward, to help all of us get through this. And while they are most frequently anonymous and not looking for praise, I have started a thank-a-neighbor program. If you know someone in your community who is making a difference during these trying times, we want to be able to shout them out and give them a public thank you. Please submit their name and what they are doing to VA04projects@mail.house.gov.

The Congressional Art Competition for local high schoolers is open until 4:30 PM on May 27th. Please just email a high quality photo of artwork to VA04.Projects@mail.house.gov.

Pre-registration for the Congressional App Challenge, where high schoolers develop apps for phones and computers, is also open now. Once students have signed up they can start coding immediately. Information on all the above programs can be found on my website at mceachin.house.gov.

 

Dean Squires Joins Jackson-Feild’s Board

 

 

 

Dean Squires, Director of Asset Management for Highwoods Properties, Inc., has joined the Board of Trustees of Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services.

Mr. Squires oversees the property management and maintenance functions for 28 Class A commercial properties amounting to more than 2.3 million square feet, seven owners associations and two third party accounts. He began his property management career in 1985 with Harrison & Bates and joined Highwoods in 1997.

Mr. Squires is a Cum Laude graduate from Old Dominion University.

He is a member and past president of the Innsbrook Rotary Club. He was named the club’s Rotarian of the Year in 2000.  Dean has enjoyed serving the community and especially children through Rotary. He currently chairs the club’s grants committee which receives competitive grants from nonprofits and makes monetary awards based on the merits of their grant request.

He is looking forward to making a difference in the lives of children suffering from mental illness.

 

SVCC Wins! Minecraft #stayandplay Competition

 

Southside Virginia Community College’s students are finding creative ways to stay busy and engaged during COVID-19 social distancing. On April 15, 2020, Shenandoah University Esports program started the “Minecraft #stayandplay” competition. They welcomed all Virginia colleges to compete in “building” a replica or freebuild of their choice in various categories.

SVCC’s very own Network Server Technician, Anthony Taylor, led three students in the pursuit of a win.  Anthony shares, “The students really took this and ran with it. They were very engaged and productive.”

Students, Caleb Walker, Joshua Smith and Bradley Jones represented SVCC.  Joshua built a replica of SVCC’s Workforce Development Center on the John H. Daniel Campus in Keysville. Caleb provided the detail to the virtual space. Caleb also impressed Anthony and the judges with his replica of a giant SVCC Panther logo using over 65,000 blocks.  “Caleb really represented our SVCC ‘Panther Pride’ through his technical prowess.  The logo was very impressive,” Anthony related.

Southside Virginia Community College was joined in the competition by three other schools - Shenandoah University, Randolph College, and George Mason University.  The schools had the option to submit in one of three categories: Favorite Place to Hangout on the Weekend with Friends, Best Campus Build, and Best Freebuild. Judges critiqued the four individual builds submitted, and Southside won Best Campus Build! Favorite Place to Hangout and Best Freebuild went to Shenandoah University.

To view all of the entries and the judging visit this link: https://www.twitch.tv/videos/617332307

 

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