Current Weather Conditions

 
Seven Day Forecast for Emporia, Virginia
 

April 2017

GREENSVILLE/EMPORIA DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES

LOCAL BOARD MEETING

The Greensville/Emporia Department of Social Services Administrative Board will meet on Thursday, July 20, 2017, at 3:30 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Greensville/Emporia Department of Social Services located at 1748 East Atlantic Street.  The public is welcome to attend.

Charles “Charlie” Lee Phipps

Charles “Charlie” Lee Phipps, age 84, of Lawrenceville, VA passed away April 12, 2017.  He is the son of the late Rufus and Helen Pearson Phipps and is preceded in death by his brothers, Marvin Phipps and Otis Phipps; his sister, Bernice Singleton; and long time companion, Georgia V. Revis. He is survived by his daughters, Bridgette M. Phipps (Frankie) of Jacksonville, FL and Starr M. Phipps of Lawrenceville; his sons, Dwight V. Phipps (Jacqueline)  of Fort Myers, FL and Vaughn L. Phipps (Linda) of Greensboro, N.C.; his sisters, Evelyn Collins (Perry) of Hampton, VA, Maurice Grahm (Thomas) of Hampton, VA, Velma Phipps of Emporia, VA, Helen A. Robinson (Bill) of South Hill, VA, Claudette Lundy of Emporia, VA; a special niece, Marcia James (Dennis) of Norfolk, VA; a host of nieces and nephews; his sister-in-law, Nannie Mae Powell (John) of Lawrenceville, VA; his brother-in-law, Amos Singleton (Bernice) of Lawrenceville, VA; his adopted son, Woodrow Wilson of Hampton, VA; his grandchildren, Mark David Phipps and Sheena Phipps; five great grandchildren; a special great uncle, Elbert Green of New Jersey; and a special friend, William Jones, Jr. of Lawrenceville.  The family will receive friends at the home of Starr Phipps on Thursday evening.   A memorial service will be held 2:00 p.m., Friday, April 21, 2017 at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 14951 Governor Harrison Pkwy., Lawrenceville, VA  23868.  Memorial contributions may be made to Brunswick Literacy Council, P.O. Box 891, Lawrenceville, VA  23868. Williams Funeral Home, Lawrenceville will be handling the arrangements.

Walmart Partners with Local Community Colleges on Workforce Credentials

RICHMOND – The Virginia Foundation for Community College Education (VFCCE) has partnered with one of the nation’s largest retailers to respond to a growing need in the local labor market.

Thanks to a generous $80,000 grant from Walmart, the VFCCE is pledging to help hundreds of Richmond-area community college students pay for their certification exams.

The students targeted for assistance through the Workforce Credential Award initiative have completed their studies in a high-demand field like manufacturing, IT, or healthcare but may not be able to afford the cost of the certification exam (average cost of $200). The lack of certification delays their entry into the workforce.

The target population for the initiative are students at J. Sargeant Reynolds and John Tyler Community Colleges who have completed an industry-recognized and approved credit workforce training program but lack the financial resources to pay for the required certification exam.

Awards will be made on a first-come, first-served basis. The grant is expected to fund certification exams for an estimated 360 students. It is projected that 90% of the students who participate in the program will pass the exam and immediately enter the workforce in the Greater Richmond area.

Dr. Sharon Morrissey, vice chancellor for academic services & research, Dr. Gary Rhodes, president, J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College, Glenn DuBois, chancellor, Peter Johnson, Walmart market manager (north Richmond), Dennis Dickson, Walmart market manager (south Richmond), Robert Davis, Walmart regional general manager, Dr. Ted Raspiller, president, John Tyler Community College.

National Healthcare Decisions Day Set for April 19th

South Hill –VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital along with other national, state and community organizations, are leading a massive effort to highlight the importance of advance health care decision-making—an effort that has culminated in the formal designation of Wednesday, April 19, 2017 as National Healthcare Decisions Day (NHDD).

As a participating organization, VCU Health CMH is providing information and tools for the public to talk about their wishes with family, friends and health care providers, and execute written advance directives (health care power of attorney and living will) in accordance with Virginia state laws. 

Specifically, on April 19, from 9:00AM to 2:00PM, VCU Health CMH is welcoming the public throughout the day at the hospital’s main lobby, with free information about advance care planning and advance directive forms.  Come by and learn how you can protect your health care choices and wishes in the event that you are unable to speak for yourself.  For more information, contact Tammy House at (434) 447-3151 ext. 3730 or visit www.nationalhealthcaredecisionsday.org.

Mary’s Café Serves Up Great Food and Service

Several times a year, staff members at Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services (JFBHS) are invited to a special lunch at Mary’s Café.

Supervised by Mary Griffith and Shemille Dennis, on April 6 the students in the food occupations class at JFBHS prepared and served a restaurant-caliber lunch of French onion soup, steak, steamed broccoli, mashed potatoes, and strawberry-topped cheesecake.  Not only did the students plan and prepare the meal, they also performed the duties of host/hostess, and wait staff.

In the food occupations class, students learn everything about the food service business from ordering food and supplies to preparing and serving, accepting reservations by phone, fulfilling the role of wait staff, and cleaning the dining and kitchen areas. Students are also taught resume-writing skills and job-interviewing techniques.

The lessons taught by Griffith and Dennis are invaluable to the students.  While Mary’s Café is not open to the general public, the staff members who participated reported that the service was excellent and the meal was as good as any prepared in a commercial restaurant.

Dr. Paul Weidman Joins VCU Health CMH

South Hill – VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital in South Hill would like to welcome Dr. Paul Weidman to our family of health care providers.  Dr. Weidman specializes in Family Medicine.

Dr. Weidman comes to VCU Health CMH with more than 16 years of medical experience and most recently operated his own family practice in St. Clairsville, Ohio.  He also has experience as a Medical Director for Amedisys Hospice in West Virginia. 

Dr. Weidman received his medical degree from West Virginia University School of Medicine in Morgantown, West Virginia.  He completed his residency in family practice at Wheeling Hospital in Wheeling, West Virginia.  He is board certified by the American Board of Family Practice.

He is married and has five children.  In his spare time he enjoys spending time with family, his five (four rescued) dogs, bird-watching, fishing and astronomy. 

Dr. Weidman is currently working at CMH Family Care Center located at 420 Durant Street in South Hill.  He is currently accepting new patients; to schedule an appointment call (434) 584-0046.

Dr. Weidman joins Dr. Rebecca Kirker, Pediatrician, and Teresa Parham, Nurse Practitioner at CMH Family Care Center where they offer complete health care for every member of the family.  To view a full list of services visit:  cmhfamilycarecenter.org

Southside Regional Medical Center Professional Schools Waives Application Fee for Military

Colonial Heights, VA– For those interested in a healthcare career, Southside Regional Medical Center Professional Schools (SRMCPS) waives the $70 application fee for military and their dependents. In order to process the credit to their account, the applicant must be able to provide a valid military ID card.

Dana Swales took advantage of the waived application fee and is a current nursing student at SRMCPS. Upon her husband’s retirement from Fort Lee, they discussed the possibility of her returning to school to follow her dream of becoming a nurse. Dana had visited many of the various nursing programs in the local area. She states, “I ultimately decided on SRMC as it just felt right to me.” Since her enrollment in the program, she discovered that the class size is relatively small which lends to more one-on-one instruction, and faculty members not only encourage you to succeed but are always available to ensure you receive the additional help that you may need. She also states, “The program is as difficult as it should be, but it’s fully worth the hard work!”

The school is open to any individual 18 years of age or older. Individuals under the age of 18 may be admitted if they are a high school graduate or if they possess a GED or high school equivalent. Students must meet the required program pre-requisites and have graduated from a regionally accredited high school, state-recognized home school or the equivalent.

Upon completion of meeting specific program education requirements, students will receive an Associate Degree for their program of study: Diagnostic Medical Sonography, Nursing or Radiation Sciences. Following graduation, students are eligible to take national board exams. “In 2016, all three programs achieved 100% pass rates on national board exams. We are so proud of our students,” states Cynthia Parsons, Vice President of the Professional Schools.

SRMCPS, located at 430 Clairmont Court, Suite 200, in Colonial Heights, is comprised of three academic programs: Nursing, Radiation Sciences and Diagnostic Medical Sonography. The schools have a technologically advanced, 24,000 square foot campus that includes spacious classrooms with audio/video capabilities, a computer lab, SmartBoards, Wi-Fi, a nursing simulation lab with mannequins, two radiography labs and a sonography lab. Since its founding in 1895, the Professional Schools has graduated thousands of students who have made many remarkable and valuable contributions to the communities in which they live and work. SRMCPS is accredited by several organizations and certified to operate by The State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV). Southside Regional Medical Center is owned in part by physicians. For more information about the Professional Schools, please visit SRMConline.com/ProfessionalSchools or contact the school at 804-765-5800.

Mrs. Clyde M. Daniels

Mrs. Clyde M. Daniels, 87, of Emporia, widow of Charles R. Chuck” Daniels, passed away Sunday, April 9, 2017. She was preceded in death by two brothers, Robert “Pudding, Jr.” Matthews and Glenn Thomas Matthews and a sister, Mary Lynn Norsworthy. Mrs. Daniels is survived by a son, Charles R. “Todd” Daniels, Jr.; two daughters, Leslie Jo Lee and Terri Lynn Link and husband, Wayne; seven grandchildren, twelve great-grandchildren and a great-great-granddaughter; three sisters, Virginia Lee Harrell, Patricia Ann Moseley and Louise Matthews “Sister” Allen and a number of nieces and nephews. The funeral service will be held 2 p.m. Thursday, April 13 at Owen Funeral Home, 303 S. Halifax Rd, Jarratt, Virginia where the family will receive friends one hour prior to the service.  Interment in Greensville Memorial Cemetery.  Memorial contributions may be made to the American Cancer Society. Online condolences may be shared with the family at www.owenfh.com

VCU Health CMH Makes List of Healthgrades Top Hospitals for Patient Safety

South Hill- VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital was named as one of the top hospitals in the nation for patient safety according to a list released by Healthgrades.  This is the third consecutive year that VCU Health CMH has made this list. 

Each hospital on the list is given the distinction as a Healthgrades 2017 Patient Safety Excellence Award recipient. 

This distinction places an elite group of hospital recipients within the top 10% of all hospitals evaluated for their superior performance in safeguarding patients from serious, potentially preventable complications during their hospital stays. Patient Safety Excellence Award recipients were determined by evaluating the occurrence of observed incidents and expected performance for 13 Patient Safety Indicators as defined by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

“The 2017 Patient Safety Excellence Award that CMH received is due to the dedication and commitment on the part of all members of the CMH team.  I am proud of their continued commitment toward making CMH one of the safest hospitals in the Commonwealth and in the country,” said W. Scott Burnette, CEO, VCU Health CMH.

In total, 460 hospitals (21 in Virginia) received the award this year, representing the top 10 percent of facilities in the nation.  VCU Health CMH was the only hospital in the southern Virginia region to earn this distinction.

Healthgrades said 134,568 patient safety events could have been avoided if all hospitals performed like the winners did.

Healthgrades is the leading online resource for comprehensive information about physicians and hospitals. Today, more than one million people a day use the Healthgrades website to search, compare and connect with hospitals and physicians based on the most important measures when selecting a healthcare provider: experience, hospital quality and patient satisfaction. For more information about Healthgrades, visit www.healthgrades.com.

Platt Urges Democrats to get behind McEachin K-12 Education Bill

“63 years after we outlawed unequal facilities, the average Virginia child is going to an obsolete K-12 facility according to national standards. This isn’t the equality we should be looking for!”

Great Falls, Virginia -- Democrat Susan Platt, a candidate for Lt. Governor in the June 13 primary, called on fellow Democrats “to get behind the potentially game-changing K-12 facility legislation being championed by Democratic Congressman Don McEachin.” The measure, H.R. 922 (a bill introduced in the House of Representatives last February), almost certainly “is the best hope in Virginia history to enable localities to afford modernizing their oldest, undated facilities, a pre-requisite to the equal educational opportunity that Dr. King wanted for our children, that Democrats have long promised the working families of Virginia” said Platt.

In 2013, then Governor Robert McDonnell order the state’s first-ever K-12 facility review. He found the results shocking. Besides obsolete nature of the average facility, upwards of 40% of Virginia’s K-12 buildings were sufficiently aged to be considered as “historic” structures under federal and state law.

McEachin’s legislation addresses an unintended anti-education bias in federal law. In 1986, Republican President Ronald Reagan and Democratic House Speaker “Tip” O’Neill created the “federal rehabilitation tax credit.” It incentivized modernization of buildings sufficiently aged to qualify as historic under the law. But the IRS code contained unappreciated legalese buried in arcane bureaucratese.

Platt said the Trump Hotel project in Washington provides an easily understood explanation. The Trump Organization modernized a government owned building – the old DC Post Office – into a new Hotel use pursuant to a long-term lease. This enabled the project to take advantage of beneficial “federal rehabilitation tax credit” financing. However, because a local K-12 facility modernization project aims to keep the same use – a local school – it runs afoul of the so-called “prior use” rule. The “prior use” rule says this financing is barred when the post-modernization usage remains the same.

“This seeming little rule has a huge anti-education impact” said Platt. “Based on current law, it can drive up local school modernization costs by upwards of 33% or possibly even more here in Virginia depending on the particular circumstances of a project.”

From academia to Main Street, the 40,000 federal rehabilitation tax credit financed projects around the country have been widely praised.

“Every dollar saved in local construction costs is a dollar available to improve local instruction without raising local taxes or incurring more local debt.”

Platt pointed out that the Congressional Black Caucus presented Don’s bill to President Trump at their meeting last month.” “Dean Rozell of the George Mason School of Public Policy wrote an article on it, I recommend it to everyone.”

Platt applauded Congressman McEachin for his efforts.

“Education is the great equalizer, that’s what Dr. King said and he was so right,” pointed out Platt.

“Democratic leaders, and thus who want to be Democratic leaders, need to publicly support and get behind Don.”

The Brown decision was in 1954. After 63 years, “I think the children of Virginia have waited long enough” declared Platt.

Williamsville Wellness Introduces Innovative Program to Treat Addiction

~Lifesaving online addiction treatment program is the first of its kind in the country~

Richmond, VA (April 7, 2017)– Williamsville Wellness, a Richmond-based addiction treatment program is proud to announce the launch of smartIOP, the first online intensive outpatient program (IOP) for drug and alcohol abuse licensed by the state of Virginia. The new online IOP is a new feature of their full comprehensive, holistic treatment program for adults with alcohol and other substance-related addictions.

“The mission of Williamsville Wellness is to provide holistic, individualized treatment that offers hope and recovery for those addicted to alcohol and/or other drugs.” comments Robert Cabaniss, Founder and Executive Director of Williamsville Wellness.

SmartIOPis the only online IOP for alcohol and drug addiction licensed by the Virginia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services. On average, the program can be completed in 6 to 12 weeks.

“To be successful in the treatment of and recovery from addiction, we must make therapy effective, efficient and convenient to live a normal life.” comments Cabaniss.

With ten years of experience in addiction recovery programs, Williamsville Wellness has the most intense one-on-one therapy program, offering 15+ individual sessions a week plus 18 hours of group education, and participation in on and off-site 12-step and SMART recovery meetings every week. IOPs are recognized by the courts and insurance companies as being more effective than outpatient therapy alone. Judges often use IOPs in sentencing to reduce the chance of another conviction and many addicts can benefit from an IOP before trying a 30-day rehabilitation program. Addiction treatment programs can now be covered by Medicaid.

“With more people dying from overdoses than car accidents and the rise in alcoholism across the state, the time is now for our community to help those with addictions get the treatment needed stop using and start living.” says Cabaniss. For more information, please visit: www.WilliamsvilleWellness.com.  

About Williamsville Wellness: Williamsville Wellness is a unique treatment center designed for men and women suffering from compulsive gambling, alcoholism, or drug abuse. Williamsville Wellness provides clients with the essential tools to achieve and maintain abstinence and recovery as well as restore healthy functioning with a sense of balance and well-being. Licensed by the Virginia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services for treatment of Gambling Addiction, Chemical Dependency, & Impulse Control Disorders.

Free Movie Screening of “Being Mortal”

Bestselling author, Dr. Atul Gwande

SOUTH HILL, VA– CMH Community Hospice of VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital is hosting a free movie screening of the PBS Frontline film “Being Mortal” on Thursday, April 20th at 6:00PM in the CMH Education Center auditorium.

The documentary film is based on the New York Times best-selling book “Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End” by Atul Gwande, MD.  The film explores the hopes of patients and families facing terminal illness and their relationships with the physicians who treat them.

To register or for more information please call:  434-447-3151 ext. 3454.

CMH Community Hospice is a not-for-profit agency committed to caring for individuals dealing with chronic illness, facing the end of life or grieving the loss of loved ones. Hospice offers comprehensive hospice and palliative care, emotional counseling, spiritual support and other services to the people of Mecklenburg, Brunswick, Lunenburg and Nottoway Counties without regard for race, age, faith, diagnosis or ability to pay.

Josephine Allen Covington

Josephine Allen Covington, 85, widow of Gordon Covington, passed away, Friday, April 7, 2017. She is survived by her daughter, Jo Gale Covington, goddaughter, Nancy Turner and husband, Joey and their children, Debra, Dwayne and Robbie and their children, Allysa, Jamison and Mallory; one sister, Esther Allen and numerous nieces and nephews. The funeral service will be held graveside 2 p.m. Sunday, April 9, 2017 at Fountain Creek Baptist Church Cemetery. The family will receive friends in the church social hall following the service. Online condolences may be shared with the family at www.owenfh.com

Gov. McAuliffe keeps a perfect veto record

By Julie Rothey, Capital News Service

RICHMOND – Terry McAuliffe not only set a record for the number of bills vetoed by a Virginia governor. He also has a perfect record for the number of vetoes sustained.

Republicans in the General Assembly failed to override any of the 40 vetoes that the Democratic governor issued on bills passed during this year’s legislative session, including measures that sought to increase voting requirements and make it easier to carry concealed weapons.

During his four years in office, McAuliffe has vetoed a total of 111 bills – more than any of his predecessors. None of them have been overturned, Susan Swecker, chairwoman of the Democratic Party of Virginia, noted.

“Whether he is fighting for the rights of women, immigrants, or the LGBT community, Governor McAuliffe has promised to keep Virginia open and welcoming for all its citizens. Thanks to the Democrats who fought to sustain his vetoes, he was able to keep that promise,” Swecker said in a statement.

“With the help of Democrats in the General Assembly, the Governor has formed a wall of reason to protect Virginians from harmful legislation that would hurt our economy and working families.”

Republicans see it differently. They say McAuliffe and Democratic legislators have shunned bipartisanship and blocked common-sense legislation that would prevent voter fraud and let Virginians defend themselves.

For example, McAuliffe vetoed SB 1299, which would have allowed Virginians who are under a protective order to carry a concealed handgun while they wait for their concealed weapon permit to be issued. McAuliffe said, “The bill perpetuates the dangerous fiction that the victims of domestic violence will be safer by arming themselves. It would inject firearms into a volatile domestic violence situation, making that situation less safe, not more.”

On Wednesday, the General Assembly reconvened to consider the governor’s vetoes and legislative recommendations.

The Senate voted 23-17 in favor of overriding McAuliffe’s veto of SB 1299, with Democratic Sens. Chap Petersen of Fairfax and Lynwood Lewis of Accomack County joining the 21 Republican senators in voting yes. However, it takes 27 votes – a two-thirds majority – to override a veto in the Senate.

The bill’s sponsor – Sen. Jill Vogel, R-Winchester – was disappointed. She said the bill would have “allowed law-abiding victims of domestic violence, stalking and sexual abuse to carry concealed weapons on an emergency basis so they are not left defenseless while waiting carry permit paperwork. Many other states have passed similar emergency provisions and victims’ lives have been protected. “

Legislators also sustained McAuliffe’s vetoes of bills that would have required more identification for in-person and absentee voting and increased scrutiny of registration lists. Republicans said such measures would make it harder for people to vote illegally. McAuliffe said that voter fraud has not been a problem, that the bills could prevent qualified people from voting and that the legislation would put a financial burden on local governments.

In addition to the vetoes, the governor sent 85 bills back to the assembly with recommendations. More than 80 percent of the recommendations were accepted.

However, the General Assembly rejected McAuliffe’s recommendations to expand Medicaid and to reinstate a law limiting handgun purchases to one per month in Virginia.

“I remain disappointed that Republicans chose to block our efforts to expand Medicaid and reinstate the one-handgun-per-month rule,” McAuliffe said after Wednesday’s session. “Both proposals are common-sense measures that would save lives in Virginia.”

April is National Alcohol Awareness Month

This April is Alcohol Awareness Month.  Founded and sponsored by the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc. (NCADD) since 1987, this year’s theme is: “Talk Early, Talk Often: Parents Can Make a Difference in Teen Alcohol Use.”

No other substance is more widely used and abused by America’s youth than alcohol, making alcoholism and alcohol-related problems the number one public health problem in the United States.

It is important to know that parents play a significant role in preventing and reducing the incidence of underage alcohol and drug use.  Fostering healthy and responsible attitudes, talking openly and honestly, encouraging supportive relationships, and showing children that their opinions and decisions matter, are all ways to help prevent the use of alcohol and drugs.

In fact, research has shown that kids who have conversations with their parents and learn a lot about the dangers of alcohol and drug use are 50% less likely to use alcohol and drugs than those who don’t have such conversations.

It can be challenging to develop the communication skills needed to talk with your children about drinking and drugs, but it will be well worth the effort you put into it, as you get to know your children a little better and help them build the coping skills they need to handle the anger, stress, peer pressure, loneliness and disappointment that are part of being an adolescent.

So, let’s get started.  We can’t afford to wait any longer.  For more information about alcohol education, services & treatment, contact District 19 Community Services Board at (804)862-8002.

VCU Health CMH to Offer Babysitting Training Course

SOUTH HILL --The Health & Wellness Department of VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital in South Hill will offer the Smartkids 101 Babysitting Training Course this summer.

The Smartkids 101 is a Babysitting Training Course especially designed for students age 11 to 14.  It teaches essential child care skills needed for responsible babysitters caring for infants, toddlers and older children.

The class will include child and infant safety, poison control, CPR, first aid and basic child care skills.  At the end of the class students will receive a babysitting certificate, and be certified in American Heart-Heart Savers CPR and First aid.  Students will also be taught to react in an emergency situation and know who to call.  Students will learn about the babysitting business, build self-esteem and learn skills that will last a lifetime.

This one day, 8-hour course will be taught in the VCU Health CMH Education Center at 125 Buena Vista Circle in South Hill from 8:00AM to 4:15PM on the following dates- May 31, June 19 & 30 and July 14.  The class is free but limited to 10 participants. To register for one of these courses, please contact the Health & Wellness department at 434-774-2541. These classes fill up quickly, so call today!

Certified Welders

The students pictured here earned the State Level AWS (American Welding Society) Welding Certification while still enrolled at GCHS! 

Pictured from left to right: CTE Director, LaMeka Harrison; students, Joshua Vaughan, Tyler Prince, and Hunter Cifers; Welding Instructor, Jerry Brown.

GOP rejects governor’s bid to expand Medicaid

By Maura Mazurowski, Capital News Service

RICHMOND – Democratic Gov. Terry McAuliffe blasted Republican legislators Wednesday after they rejected his budget amendment to expand Medicaid in Virginia.

“Virginia Republicans block #Medicaid expansion once again,” McAuliffe tweeted after the General Assembly reconvened to consider legislation that the governor vetoed or wanted amended.

“400k Virginians remain w/o healthcare. We’re losing $6.6mil every day,” McAuliffe wrote after the GOP-controlled House of Delegates rebuffed his Medicaid proposal.

McAuliffe and other Democrats reiterated their call for Medicaid expansion after the U.S. House of Representatives last month failed to reach an agreement on repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act.

That federal law, also known as Obamacare, encouraged states to expand Medicaid, the health coverage program for low-income Americans.

The proposed amendment would have given McAuliffe the authority in October to direct the Department of Medical Assistance Services to expand Medicaid if the Affordable Care Act is still in place. State officials say the expansion would cover about 400,000 low-income Virginians.

Every year since he was elected in 2013, McAuliffe has advocated expanding Medicaid. And every year, Republican lawmakers have voted against the idea.

“We rejected expansion in 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, and again in 2017 because it was the wrong policy for the commonwealth,” the GOP House leadership said in a statement Wednesday. “The lack of action in Washington has not changed that and in fact, the uncertainty of federal health policy underscores the need to be cautious over the long term.”

Under the Affordable Care Act, states can expand Medicaid to cover people making up to 138 percent of the federal poverty level, or about $16,640 for an individual. About half of the 31 states that accepted Medicaid expansion have Republican governors. Earlier in the session, Del. Jimmie Massie, R-Henrico, outlined the Republicans’ position on the issue.

“Our Republican caucus believes in minimal government, in government doing only what it must,” Massie said.

He said Medicaid is the largest entitlement program in the state and costs are rising.

“As such, we cannot prudently responsibly expand such an entitlement program at this time,” Massie said. “We must reform it and look for the Virginia way. And that is exactly what we’re doing in this house.”

Delegate Massie has since announced his resignation from the Virginia House of Delegates.

Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam, a practicing pediatric neurologist, pushed for McAuliffe’s proposed amendment just before the veto session began Wednesday.

“We need to do the right thing here in Virginia. We need to go upstairs, both in the House and the Senate, and pass the governor’s amendment to move forward with Medicaid expansion,” Northam said.

Liberal organizations like Progress Virginia were angered by the GOP’s decision on the matter.

“Health care is a basic human right. It is beyond outrageous that House Republicans have prioritized petty partisan politics over real human lives by refusing to expand Medicaid,” Anna Scholl, executive director of Progress Virginia, said in a press release. “These politicians should look in the eyes of individuals they’ve denied health care access and explain their vote.”

The issue is likely to remain contentious as McAuliffe finishes his term and Virginia elects a new governor in November. Northam is competing with former U.S. Rep. Tom Perriello for the Democratic nomination. Three candidates are seeking the Republican nomination: Ed Gillespie, former chairman of the Republican National Committee; state Sen. Frank Wagner of Virginia Beach; and Corey Stewart, who chairs the Prince William Board of County Supervisors.

“I will continue to fight for access to quality and affordable healthcare for all Virginians along with the Governor and our administration,” Northam said in a statement.

Southside Regional Medical Center Accepting Applications for Summer Junior Volunteer Program

PETERSBURG, VA  – Southside Regional Medical Center (SRMC) is currently accepting applications for the 2017 Junior Volunteer Program.  Applications can be picked up at the Welcome Center in SRMC’s main lobby or downloaded at SRMConline.com/community under “Volunteering” and must be returned no later than April 28. Teens must be at least 14 years old and show proof of age if they are selected for the program. Junior Volunteers will be required to submit to a drug screening and TB test.

The Summer Junior Volunteer Program will take place June 21– August 03, 2017.

Junior Volunteers will be assigned to work in specific departments within SRMC.  For additional information, contact Lisa Mason, Manager, Volunteer & Support Services, at 804-765-5786 or at lisa_mason@chs.net.

Lawmakers blast Trump budget that would cut Chesapeake Bay cleanup

Photo by TOM HAUSMAN      

By BRIANA THOMAS,  Maryland Capital News Service

WASHINGTON - Lawmakers from states surrounding the Chesapeake Bay on Wednesday expressed bipartisan criticism of President Donald Trump’s proposal to end federal support for cleaning up Chesapeake Bay.

“The president’s budget that would zero out the Chesapeake Bay Program is outrageous,” Maryland Sen. Ben Cardin, a Democrat, said at a Capitol Hill meeting with members of the Choose Clean Water Coalition. “It’s dead on arrival.”

Rep. Rob Wittman, R-Va., said cutting investments for the bay clean up will not help the economy.

“Our Chesapeake Bay is an economic engine and the cleaner it is the more it produces economically,” he said.

The nonprofit coalition hosted its fifth annual lobbying day, centered around saving the federally funded Chesapeake Bay Program after Trump last month proposed a “skinny budget” thatwould eliminate the $73 million bay restoration project.

The Environmental Protection Agency provides the program with monetary support to restore the bay’s ecosystem and reduce pollution.

Started in 1983, the program is conducted under a six-state partnership with Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, New York and the District of Columbia.

Advocates from each state attended the meeting with lawmakers.

“We know how important the Chesapeake Bay is for the entire region,” said Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger, D-Md. “We are going to fight harder and harder and harder.”

Ruppersberger said the bay generates more than $1 trillion annually and the restoration of oysters, tributaries and streams is a project that needs to be continued.

The bay is a source of drinking water for 75 percent of the region’s 17 million residents, according to the Choose Clean Water Coalition.

The Chesapeake also is the largest estuary in the United States serving as aplace for recreational water activities, as well as a workplace for the commercial fishing and crabbing industry.

Made up of 225 local, state, and national groups, the Choose Clean Water Coalition has been advocating for a healthy Chesapeake watershed since 2009.

“The Coalition will work to continue to push back on the president’s proposed budget, and secure the essential funding that is necessary to return clean water to the Chesapeake Bay,” coalition spokeswoman Kristin Reilly said in a statement Wednesday.

Members of the House and Senate said they were pleased to have bipartisan support for clean water.

“The Chesapeake Bay is the perfect thing to come together around and serve energetically,” said Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine, last year’s Democratic vice presidential nominee.

He said everyone has to work together to make sure checks and balances are implemented.

“We have an EPA administrator who doesn’t accept science. If you don’t accept climate science, it’s a fair question to ask if you accept science,” Kaine said, referring to Scott Pruitt, head of the EPA.

Trump signed an executive order last week to shut downthe Obama administration’s Clean Power Plan, a program aimed at reducing climate change by cutting carbon emissions from power plants.

“We are faced with a tough budget battle, but an attitude from the EPA that says we can ignore science,” Kaine said.

The bay is a valuable natural resource and if Trump wants more jobs, then he should work to rehabilitate the bay, Wittman said.

The congressman said he was deeply concerned about Trump’s budget plan and wrote a letter to the administration asking to restore resources to the bay.

Wittman wants more money to help revitalize wetlands.

“Our wetlands are the nursery for everything that lives in those ecosystems...mother nature is the sponge that absorbs what man puts in it,” he said.

Brunswick Academy Theatre presents Shrek The Musical

Brunswick Academy Theatre presents Shrek The Musical on Friday, April 7th at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, April 8th at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, April 9th at 3:00 p.m. in the B.A. Gymnasium.  Tickets are on sale NOW - Adult tickets are $12.00 and Student tickets are $8.00  Don't miss this fun show and talented cast of students.  A great outing for the entire family! Call Kristine Thompson at 434-848-2220 for more information.

VSU Offers Free Workshop on Raising Fish in Pond Cages

The Aquaculture Program at Virginia State University has scheduled a fish cage-building workshop on April 27 from 1:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. at VSU’s Randolph Farm, located at 4415 River Road, Ettrick.

Free and open to the public, the workshop is designed for anyone with a farm pond who is interested raising fish in cages for profit or personal consumption. 

Participants will learn the basics of cage aquaculture and construct a fish cage. Cage-building materials will be provided but participants are encouraged to bring leather gloves, tin snips, a tape measure, cutting pliers and protective goggles.

Registration is limited to 20 and is available on a first-come, first-served basis. To register, visit VSU's Cooperative Extension events calendar at www.ext.vsu.edu. For more information or for persons with a disability who desire assistive devices, services or other accommodations to participate in this activity, please contact Debra B. Jones at dbjones@vsu.edu  or call (804) 524-5496/ TDD (800) 828-1120 during business hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. to discuss accommodations no later than five days prior to the event.

Extension is a joint program of Virginia Tech, Virginia State University, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and state and local governments.  Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, veteran status, or any other basis protected by law.  An equal opportunity/affirmative action employer.  Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating.  Edwin J. Jones, Director, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; M. Ray McKinnie,  Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State University, Petersburg.

Dr. Cynthia Austin Joins VCU Health CMH

South Hill – VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital in South Hill would like to welcome Dr. Cynthia Austin to our family of health care providers.  Dr. Austin specializes in Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Dr. Cynthia Austin is a Board Certified OB/GYN who has devoted her career to providing the best and most complete OB/GYN care for her patients for more than 20 years. She earned a Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) degree from Eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk, Virginia and completed her internship and residency training at Franklin Square Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, where she served as Chief Resident. She was a partner in health for hundreds of women as a top OB/GYN at one of Northern Virginia’s leading health maintenance organizations(HMOs).

During her 18 plus years of practice, Dr. Austin obtained her Masters of Public Health (MPH) degree in Public Health Management from the Milken Institute School of Public Health at George Washington University and  went on to complete the Healthcare Executives Leadership Curriculum at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.   She is a community faculty at Eastern Virginia Medical School and a member of several professional organizations including the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Dr. Austin is passionate about women’s health.  She believes a healthy woman promotes a healthier household, community and world.  She is married and a mother of five children.  In her free time she enjoys reading, teaching, and medical missions.   She is bilingual and enjoys engaging with people from around the world.

Dr. Austin is currently working at CMH Women’s Health Services located at 420 Bracey Lane in South Hill.  She is currently accepting new patients; to schedule an appointment call (434) 447-7765.

Dr. Austin along with Terry Wooten, Certified Nurse-Midwife provide a complete range of personalized and preventive gynecologic care to women at every stage of life.  To view a full list of services visit:  cmhwomenshealthservices.org

SBA Administrator Honors Nation’s Top Small Businesses

Winners to be formally recognized in Washington, D.C. on April 30 – May 1

RICHMOND– Administrator Linda McMahon, the head of the U.S. Small Business Administration, announces Corliss Udoema, President and CEO of Contract Solutions, Inc.  

“It is my honor and distinct pleasure to announce the 54 winners from across the U.S. and its territories,” McMahon said. “These small business owners define entrepreneurial spirit and best represent the 28 million small businesses that are the backbone and economic engine for today’s economy. I look forward to welcoming the winners to Washington next month when they are officially honored for their achievements.”

Contract Solutions, Inc. is 8(a) and economically-disadvantaged women-owned small business that provides professional support services to a wide array of federal and state government agencies and private sector clients. 

All of the winners have been invited to attend ceremonies in Washington, D.C on April 30 – May 1 where they will be honored with their individual award along with recognition of the three runners-up and the naming of the 2017 National Small Business Person of the Year. 

Each year since 1963, the president has issued a proclamation calling for the celebration of National Small Business Week.  National Small Business Week is set as the first week in May, and this year the dates are April 30 – May 6 with national events planned in Washington, D.C., New York City, Indianapolis, Dallas and Fresno, Calif.

Beck’s Cool Job Let’s Her Work From Home

Shanetta Beck has a cool job because she is doing what she loves to do.  Beck is owner of her own business, Baskets by Occasion.  She started this as a cottage industry on a part time basis and now has transformed her hobby into a prosperous business.

Beck, who lives in Emporia, is a graduate of Southside Virginia Community College with an Associate’s degree in Criminal Justice.  She fondly remembers her mentors from her student years at SVCC, especially Dr. Al Roberts who is now President and Trooper Ron Posey who taught some of her classes. 

When she attended SVCC, she was working as a Corrections Officer and the degree she worked towards helped her with on-the-job promotions. 

In her mid-twenties when she returned to school, Beck also already had children.  She wanted to go to college to encourage them to succeed in life.

“I feel good that I got an SVCC education,” she said and is still involved with the college by using the Longwood Small Business Development Center that comes to the Southside Virginia Education Center in Greensville County and through participation in the Pink Power Celebration at Christanna Campus.

A breast cancer survivor, Beck is adamant in her support of breast cancer awareness and fund raising for the cause.  Only 35 years old when her cancer was discovered, Beck has been in cure mode for the past four years.  One reason she likes having her own business is she can pace herself; her treatment for the disease took a toll on her energy level.  But, with her enthusiasm for her career and her personality, she seems pretty energetic.

She works closely with the Emporia-Greensville Chamber of Commerce and networks with others there to promote her business.  She offers baskets that are custom made for all occasions including weddings, babies, birthdays, holidays, she plans children’s parties and makes welcome baskets and dipped treats and fruits.  Her shop, located in a tiny house in her yard, is brimming with baskets, filled pocketbooks and other ideas for any occasion.

Her enthusiasm for her creations is contagious.  She is in her happy place while tucked amongst the many completed baskets and gift items in her shop.  

Assembly reconvenes Wednesday for ‘veto session’

By SaraRose Martin, Capital News Service

RICHMOND – Legislators will return to the state Capitol on Wednesday to consider 39 bills that Democratic Gov. Terry McAuliffe vetoed during the General Assembly’s 2017 session.

To override a veto, the Republican-controlled Assembly must muster a two-thirds majority in both the House and the Senate. Because the Democrats hold 34 seats in the House and 19 in the Senate, McAuliffe should have the votes to sustain his vetoes.

Legislators will vote on the governor’s vetoes of legislation covering a range of topics, including whether to impose more requirements on voter registration, restrict absentee voting and expand access to handguns.

McAuliffe vetoed a record 40 bills during the legislative session that ended Feb. 25. On the session’s final day, the General Assembly dealt with one of the vetoes – McAuliffe’s rejection of HB 2264, which would have cut off state funds for Planned Parenthood and other groups that provide abortions. The veto was sustained by a 62-33 vote in the House.

McAuliffe warned at the beginning of the session that he would veto any social-issue bills that he believed may harm the rights of women or the LGBTQ community. Republican leaders in the House have said that McAuliffe has reneged on his pledge to be bipartisan and that his office has been “the most disengaged administration we have worked with.”

Among legislation vetoed are six education-related bills, such as SB 1283, which would allow the state Board of Education to create regional charter schools without the permission of local school boards.

McAuliffe also vetoed bills to allow a freestanding agency to offer online education programs to Virginia students (HB 1400) and to require schools to notify parents of sexually explicit material (HB 2191). McAuliffe said these bills collectively would “undermine” the state’s public schools.

The governor also rejected legislation to expand access to weapons. He vetoed HB 1582, which would allow 18-year-old active members of the military to apply for concealed handgun permits, and SB 1347, which would allow concealed carry of a switchblade knife.

McAuliffe also turned down bills that Republicans say would prevent voter fraud but the governor said would be obstacles to voting. They included SB 1581, which would require voter registrars to verify with the Social Security Administration that the name, date of birth and Social Security number of voter registration applications. Another vetoed bill, SB 1253, would require electronic poll books to contain photo identification of registered voters.

Lawmakers will also consider recommendations that McAuliffe made to 74 bills. Notably, the governor has proposed an amendment to the state budget (HB 1500) that would allow him to expand Medicaid, an optional provision of the federal Affordable Care Act. McAuliffe said this has become an urgent issue since Congress rejected President Donald Trump’s efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act last month.

Virginians in the coverage gap held a press conference Monday to urge legislators to vote for Medicaid expansion. This expansion would mean 400,000 Virginians who don’t currently qualify for Medicaid but can’t afford health insurance will be able to get covered.

“Republicans no longer have an excuse for not passing Medicaid expansion in Virginia,” said Anna Scholl, executive director of Progress Virginia. “All Virginians deserve to be able to see a doctor when they need one, regardless of income.”

Republican leaders said that their opposition remains the smart move and that they will reject McAuliffe’s proposed budget amendment. They fear that if Virginia expands Medicaid, the state will get stuck with the bills in the future.

Agenda for Wednesday’s reconvened session

McAuliffe vetoed 40 bills from the 2017 legislative session. The General Assembly will take up 39 of those vetoes during Wednesday’s session. They are:

     

Bill number

Description

Sponsor

HB1394

Franchisees; status thereof and its employees as employees of the franchisor.

Head

HB1400

Virginia Virtual School Board; established, report.

Bell, Richard P.

HB1428

Absentee voting; photo identification required with application.

Fowler

HB1432

Switchblade knife; exception to carry concealed.

Ware

HB1468

Incarcerated persons, certain; compliance with detainers, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Marshall, R.G.

HB1578

Students who receive home instruction; participation in interscholastic programs (Tebow Bill).

Bell, Robert B.

HB1582

Concealed handgun permits; age requirement for persons on active military duty.

Campbell

HB1596

Virginia Public Procurement Act; public works contracts, prevailing wage provisions.

Webert

HB1605

Virginia Parental Choice Education Savings Accounts; established, report.

LaRock

HB1753

Local government; prohibiting certain practice requiring contractors to provide compensation, etc.

Davis

HB1790

Administrative Process Act; development and periodic review of regulations, report.

Lingamfelter

HB1836

Spotsylvania Parkway; VDOT to maintain a certain segment beginning in 2020.

Orrock

HB1852

Concealed handguns; protective orders.

Gilbert

HB1853

Victims of domestic violence, etc.; firearms safety or training course.

Gilbert

HB2000

Sanctuary policies; prohibited.

Poindexter

HB2002

Refugee and immigrant resettlements; reports to Department of Social Services.

Poindexter

HB2025

Religious freedom; solemnization of marriage.

Freitas

HB2077

Emergency Services and Disaster Law of 2000; reference to firearms, emergency shelter.

Wilt

HB2092

Application for public assistance; eligibility, review of records.

LaRock

HB2191

School boards; procedures for handling sexually explicit instructional materials, etc.

Landes

HB2198

Coal tax; limits aggregate amount of credits that may be allocated or claimed for employment, etc.

Kilgore

HB2207

Food stamp program; requests for replacement of electronic benefit transfer card.

Robinson

HB2342

Public schools; Board of Education shall only establish regional charter school divisions.

Landes

HB2343

Voter registration list maintenance; voters identified as having duplicate registrations.

Bell, Robert B.

HB2411

Health insurance; reinstating pre-Affordable Care Act provisions.

Byron

SB865

Furnishing certain weapons to minor; exemption.

Stuart

SB872

Absentee voting; applications and ballots; photo identification required.

Chase

SB1105

Registered voters and persons voting; reports of persons voting at elections.

Obenshain

SB1240

Virginia Virtual School Board; established, report.

Dunnavant

SB1253

Voter identification; photograph contained in electronic pollbook.

Obenshain

SB1283

Public schools; Board of Education shall only establish regional charter school divisions.

Obenshain

SB1299

Concealed handguns; protective orders.

Vogel

SB1300

Victims of domestic violence, etc.; firearms safety or training course.

Vogel

SB1324

Religious freedom; definitions, marriage solemnization, participation, and beliefs.

Carrico

SB1347

Switchblade knife; person may carry concealed, exception.

Reeves

SB1362

Concealed weapons; nonduty status active military personnel may carry.

Black

SB1455

Voter registration; monetary payments for registering for another.

Black

SB1470

Coal tax; limits aggregate amount of credits that may be allocated or claimed for employment, etc.

Chafin

SB1581

Voter registration; verification of social security numbers.

Peake

     

On the last day of the regular session, the House tried but failed to override the veto of one bill:

     

HB2264

Department of Health; restrictions on expenditure of funds related to abortions and family planning.

Cline

     

 

On Wednesday, lawmakers also will consider recommendations that McAuliffe made to 74 bills. The most important is the budget bill (HB 1500). Other legislation cover topics ranging from education and health care to tow trucks and government transparency.

     

Bill number

Description

Sponsor

HB1411

Privately retained counsel; rules and regulations, client’s failure to pay.

Albo

HB1491

Background checks; exceptions, sponsored living and shared residential service providers.

Hope

HB1500

Budget Bill.

Jones

HB1525

Driver’s licenses; revocation or suspension, laws of other jurisdictions.

Albo

HB1532

Fire Programs Fund.

Wright

HB1539

Virginia Freedom of Information Act; public access to records of public bodies.

LeMunyon

HB1663

Northern Va. Community College, et al.; computer science training, etc., for public school teachers.

Greason

HB1671

Natural gas utilities; qualified projects, investments in eligible infrastructure.

Morefield

HB1691

Widewater Beach Subdivision; DCR to convey certain real property.

Dudenhefer

HB1708

Standards of Accreditation; industry certification credentials obtained by high school students.

Filler-Corn

HB1721

Community Colleges, State Board for; reduced rate tuition and mandatory fee charges.

Anderson

HB1791

Conspiracy, incitement, etc., to riot; penalty when against public safety personnel.

Lingamfelter

HB1829

Teacher licensure; certification or training in emergency first aid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

Dudenhefer

HB1846

Death certificates; filing.

Cox

HB1851

Assault and battery against a family or household member; deferred disposition, waiver of appeal.

Gilbert

HB1854

Conflicts of Interests Acts, State & Local Government & General Assembly, lobbyist; filing.

Gilbert

HB1855

Court-ordered restitution; form order, enforcement, noncompliance, etc.

Bell, Robert B.

HB1856

Restitution; supervised probation.

Bell, Robert B.

HB1960

Tow truck drivers and towing and recovery operators; civil penalty for improper towing.

Hugo

HB2014

Standards of quality; biennial review by Board of Education.

Keam

HB2016

Electric personal delivery devices; operation on sidewalks and shared-use paths.

Villanueva

HB2017

Virginia Public Procurement Act; bid, performance, and payment bonds, waiver by localities.

Villanueva

HB2026

Property and bulk property carriers; regulation, combines authorities.

Villanueva

HB2053

Direct primary care agreements; the Commonwealth’s insurance laws do not apply.

Landes

HB2101

Health care providers; data collection.

Byron

HB2105

Investment of Public Funds Act; investment of funds in Virginia Investment Pool Trust Fund.

Byron

HB2149

Aircraft; defines ‘unmanned aircraft’ and requires aircraft to be registered with Dept. of Aviation.

Knight

HB2163

Buprenorphine without naloxone; prescription limitation.

Pillion

HB2168

Virginia Coal Train Heritage Authority; established.

Pillion

HB2201

Failure to drive on right side of highways or observe traffic lanes; increases penalties.

O’Quinn

HB2245

Virginia Research Investment Committee; expands role of Committee.

Jones

HB2289

Divorce or dissolution of marriage; award of life insurance.

Leftwich

HB2297

Oyster planting grounds; Marine Resources Commission to post.

Miyares

HB2324

Jurors; payment by prepaid debit card or card account.

Yost

HB2336

Law-enforcement officer; report of officer involved in accident.

Miller

HB2367

Virginia Port Authority; removal of members on Board of Commissioners.

Lindsey

HB2383

Combined sewer overflow outfalls; DEQ to identify owner of outfall discharging into Chesapeake Bay.

Lingamfelter

HB2386

Unpaid court fines, etc.; increases grace period for collection.

Loupassi

HB2390

Renewable energy power purchase agreements; expands pilot program.

Kilgore

HB2442

Collection fees, local; an ordinance for collection of overdue accounts.

Ingram

HB2471

Virginia Economic Development Partnership Authority; membership, powers and duties.

Jones

SB800

Direct primary care agreements; the Commonwealth’s insurance laws do not apply.

Stanley

SB812

Asbestos, Lead, and Home Inspectors, Board for; home inspections, required statement.

Marsden

SB854

Unpaid court fines, etc.; increases grace period for collection.

Stanley

SB864

Electoral board appointments; chief judge of the judicial circuit or his designee make appointment.

Stuart

SB898

Combined sewer overflow outfalls; DEQ to identify owner of outfall discharging into Chesapeake Bay.

Stuart

SB962

Sales and use tax; nexus for out-of-state businesses.

Hanger

SB1008

Barrier crimes; clarifies individual crimes, criminal history records checks.

Hanger

SB1023

Concealed handgun permits; sharing of information.

Stuart

SB1073

Bridgewater, Town of; amending charter, sets out various powers typically exercised by towns, etc.

Obenshain

SB1102

FOIA; records of completed unattended death investigations, definition, mandatory disclosure.

Surovell

SB1116

Public school employees, certain; assistance with student insulin pumps by register nurse, etc.

McPike

SB1178

Buprenorphine without naloxone; prescription limitation.

Chafin

SB1239

Child day programs; exemptions from licensure, certification of preschool or nursery school program.

Hanger

SB1258

Virginia Solar Energy Development and Energy Storage Authority; increases membership.

Ebbin

SB1282

Wireless communications infrastructure; procedure for approved by localities.

McDougle

SB1284

Court-ordered restitution; form order, enforcement, noncompliance, etc.

Obenshain

SB1285

Restitution; supervised probation.

Obenshain

SB1296

County food and beverage tax; referendum.

Vogel

SB1303

Voter registration; deadline for registration by electronic means.

Vogel

SB1312

Conflicts of Interests Acts, State & Local Government & General Assembly, lobbyist; filing.

Norment

SB1315

Foster care; possession of firearm.

Carrico

SB1364

Property and bulk property carriers; regulation, combines authorities.

Newman

SB1371

Virginia Research Investment Committee; expands role of Committee.

Saslaw

SB1398

Coal combustion residuals unit; closure permit, assessments required.

Surovell

SB1415

Virginia Port Authority; removal of members on Board of Commissioners.

Spruill

SB1416

Investment of Public Funds Act; investment of funds in Virginia Investment Pool Trust Fund.

Newman

SB1418

Electric utilities; costs of pumped hydroelectricity generation and storage facilities.

Chafin

SB1486

Law-enforcement officer; report of officer involved in accident.

Stuart

SB1492

Water utilities; retail rates of affiliated utilities, definitions, etc.

Stuart

SB1493

Northern Va. Community College, et al.; computer science training, etc., for public school teachers.

McClellan

SB1574

Virginia Economic Development Partnership Authority; membership, powers and duties.

Ruff

 

Endorsed by Sanders, Perriello campaigns in Richmond

By Tyler Hammel, Capital News Service

RICHMOND – In his bid for the Democratic nomination for governor, Tom Perriello says he would make community college free, raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour and confront the Trump administration over its policies on immigration and other issues.

Perriello – who has won an endorsement from Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders – discussed those topics Monday night at a town-hall style meeting at Virginia Union University in Richmond.

Promising to combat President Donald Trump’s administration and help create a “community of conscience,” the Charlottesville native received consistent applause from the crowd.

He touted his support of the Affordable Care Act when he served in the U.S. Congress in 2009-11. Trump, who succeeded Barrack Obama as president in January, has vowed to repeal and replace the ACA. Perriello gave credit to demonstrations such as the Women’s March on Washington for preventing that from happening.

“Five months ago, people could have curled up on the couch and cried, and I’m sure all of us did. But instead, people decided to say, ‘No, this isn’t who we are as a commonwealth; this is not something we are going to stand by passively and watch,’” Perriello said. “Because of these efforts, because of the marches, because of the protests, because of the stories, today the Affordable Care Act remains in place.”

Perriello also discussed his hope to provide free community college to Virginia residents, calling it a good investment. He said trickle-down economics – the notion that tax cuts for the wealthy will generate benefits for poorer people – doesn’t work.

“What the evidence does show you is when you actually increase wages and invest in people, then you do get growth locally, and more growth for small business,” Perriello said. “This is not something we’re doing out of the goodness of our hearts. We’re doing this because it’s a good investment strategy.”

A big part of Perriello’s speech was establishing himself as a viable candidate in the race for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination.

Perriello announced his candidacy in January, when it appeared that Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam would be uncontested in seeking the nomination.

Perriello encouraged supporters to knock on doors and volunteer on his behalf to spread the word about his campaign. That was a critical strategy at the time: Only one in five Virginians even knew his name, according to a poll published in February by the Wason Center for Public Policy at Christopher Newport University.

Last week, a survey by the center showed that Perriello and Northam were tied: Each had support from 26 percent of Democratic-leaning voters; almost half of the people polled were undecided.

At the event at Virginia Union University, Perriello had few critical things to say about Northam. Instead, he mentioned issues on which the two candidates agreed – but Perriellosaid he was the first to take those positions.

“We came out and led the way on standing up for a $15-an-hour minimum wage. A few weeks later, we saw Ralph and others court that decision,” Perriello said. “Same thing with criminal justice reform and debt-free community college. I think what we need right now is someone who’s actually leading a policy agenda.”

Perriello echoes many of the positions that Sanders espoused during his bid for the Democratic presidential nomination last year. On Tuesday, Sanders issued a statement endorsing Perriello.

“We need to elect progressives at every level of government if we are going to beat back the dangerous agenda of the Trump Administration and its Republican allies,” the statement said. “Tom is committed to fighting the rigged economy and income inequality. He was the first major statewide candidate in Virginia to run on a $15 minimum wage and the first to say two years of community college should be tuition-free.”

Perriello will face off against Northam in the Democratic primary election on June 13. Northam has the support of outgoing Gov. Terry McAuliffe and most Democrats in the Virginia General Assembly and the state’s congressional delegation.

On the Republican side, three candidates are vying for the GOP nomination for governor: Ed Gillespie, former chairman of the Republican National Committee; state Sen. Frank Wagner of Virginia Beach; and Corey Stewart, who chairs the Prince William Board of County Supervisors.

The 44th Annual Virginia Pork Festival

The 44th Annual Virginia Pork Festival will be held on Wednesday June 14th, 2017 from 4PM to 8PM. This year we have 4 bands that will include The Embers, Strictly Bizzness, Soul Attractions, and the Feature Attraction Band. Food will include  Minced Barbecue, Pit Cooked Barbecue, Barbecued Spareribs, Barbecued Boston Butt, Barbecued Loin Chops, Grilled Loin Chops, Sausage Biscuits, Pork Burgers, Sausage Burgers, Bologna Steak Burgers, Italian Sausage, Pork Meatballs , BLTs, Hot Dogs, Chitterlings, Pigs Feet, & Souse.Sides will include Black Eyed Peas & Stewed Tomatoes, Pork & Beans,  Hushpuppies, & French Fried Sweet Potatoes. Desserts will include Banana Pudding & Strawberry Shortcake. Soft drinks, Water, Tea, Anheuser-Busch Family Beers, and a Liquor Bar will be included. This event is a fundraiser for several non profit organizations in the Southside Virginia community. It is one of the largest single day festivals on the East Coast and grows every year with attendance and events. We have vendor space available at the festival for most businesses, with approval, and they can put there products and services in front of thousands of people. If you can ad this event to your calendars, we would certainly appreciate it! Tickets are available online at www.VaPorkFestival.com and are $35 per ticket.

Emporia Storage Auction Entices Treasure Hunters on April 8

Tips on how to buy at auction

EMPORIA, Va. -- The treasure hunt is on as Emporia Storage has a unit auction scheduled at its three facilities in the city beginning at 10 a.m. on April 8, rain or shine.

The auction will begin at Emporia Storage office headquarters at 315 West Atlantic Street, then move to the units on East Atlantic Street across from Georgia Pacific and finish at its third location at 623 South Main Street across from 7-11.

"The popularity of hit TV shows like 'Storage Wars' has really heightened interest in storage unit auctions. There's such mystery. You never know what you're going to find," said auctioneer Carla Harris, known to Richmond radio listeners and TV audiences as "Carla Cash."

Harris offers the following suggestions on what to look for and how to buy a unit at a storage auction:

  • Are items covered in dust? This could indicate that the contents have been there for a long time and that the previous owner considered them worth storing and saving.
  • Is it detailed? Look for ornate carvings, paint, finishes, etchings and scroll work. This could mean the piece is an antique or of fine quality.
  • Are there boxes? This is especially true of jewelry boxes, safes, and metal lock boxes. Boxes may contain hidden treasures that someone felt the need to protect by putting it in a storage unit.
  • Is there a lot of clutter? Don’t be discouraged by this. Yes, you may have to weed through quite a bit of things you don’t want, but you never know what might be hiding underneath those piles or clothes or trash bags.
  • Is it wood? Solid wood furniture is not produced as much as it once was, thus possibly making it more collectible and valuable to some.
  • Is this a potential Pinterest project? Look for furniture that can be painted, refinished and upcycled to suit your style. Your new favorite coffee table or china hutch could be inside a unit waiting for a fresh coat of paint and your imagination.
  • Are items wrapped in newspaper, bubble wrap or some sort of cover? This could indicate something fragile, valuable or collectible that the previous owner considered worth protecting.
  • Can I sell it? There’s truth to the phrase, “One man’s trash is another man’s treasure.” Perhaps a unit holds only a few things you want for yourself. You may be able to turn the rest into cash.

Several dozen units are expected to be sold at the April 8 auction. During this cash only sale, the belongings of delinquent storage units are auctioned to the highest bidder to recoup the loss of rental fees.

 

"Anything could be in a unit. We have people come from all over Virginia and even other states to check out what's inside," said Boyce Adams, owner of Emporia Storage.

 

Gates open at 9 a.m. for registration. The auction begins at 10 a.m. In this absolute auction, units will be sold "as is, where is" and contents must be removed by the winning bidder by 6 p.m. that day. A buyers’ premium will apply.

 

The auction will be conducted by Carla Harris, Emporia, Va., (434) 594-4406, VA License # 2907004352, a member of the Virginia Auctioneers Association. For more information, call Carla or Emporia Storage at (434) 634-2919, and visit facebook.com/thatcarlacash for more terms and conditions. 

Transform your ideas about the library: celebrate National Library Week April 9-15

The Meherrin Regional Library System joins libraries in schools, campuses and communities nationwide in celebrating the many ways libraries are transforming their communities every day through the services and invaluable expertise they offer.

April 9-15 is National Library Week, a time to highlight the changing role of libraries, librarians, and library workers.  Libraries aren’t only a place of quiet study, but also creative and engaging community centers where people can collaborate using new technologies.

Libraries of all types are evolving to meet the needs of the communities they serve. Elected officials, small business owners, students, and the public at large depend upon libraries and the resources they offer to address the needs of their communities. By providing such resources as e-books and computer assistance, materials for English-language learners, programs for job seekers, or a safe haven in times of crisis, libraries and librarians transform their communities.

The Meherrin Regional Library System is transforming by providing computers, printers, WIFI, and copy services in addition to the books, movies, and magazines available to check out. The library offers weekly storytimes and Summer Reading Programs, as well as meeting room spaces. The Meherrin Regional Library’s friendly staff is there to guide and assist the library patrons who visit each day.

Libraries also offer something unique to their communities - the expertise of individual librarians. Librarians assist patrons in using increasingly complex technology and sorting through the potentially overwhelming mass of information bombarding today’s digital society. This is especially crucial when access to reliable and trustworthy data is more important than ever.

First sponsored in 1958, National Library Week is a national observance sponsored by the American Library Association (ALA) and libraries across the country each April. 

 

To learn more about your local library, visit the Brunswick County Library, Lawrenceville or the Richardson Memorial Library, Emporia or the library’s Web site at www.meherrinlib.org.

Greensville Schools to host Child Find

Greensville County Public Schools will sponsor Child Find on Friday, April 28, 2017 from 10 am until 5 pm at Greensville Elementary School.

Child Find is registration for Head Start or Virginia Preschool Initiative.

Head Start is a federal preschool program which provides comprehensive services and learning experiences to prepare children for Kindergarten and move families toward self-sufficiency. The program also operates in compliance with IDEA to include children with special needs. All Head Start services are free to children and families.

The Virginia Preschool Initiative, established in 1995, distributes state funds to schools and community based organizations to provide quality preschool program for at-risk four-year-olds. The program offers full day Pre-kindergarten, parent involvement, child health and social services, and transportation to families with four-year-olds at risk of school failure.

Parents of all children who are or will be four years old on or before September 30th and are residents of Emporia or Greensville County are encouraged to attend. There will be NO TESTING. Children do NOT need to attend!

To apply, you must bring your child’s OFFICIAL birth certificate (NOT a hospital certificate), immunization record, PROOF of residency (for example: a current water/electric bill with YOUR name and address) and, because of NEW state guidelines, verification of household income (for example: paystub, W-2, Medicaid card, TANF, SNAP, WIC, SSI).

 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - April 2017

Emporia News

Stories on Emporianews.com are be searchable, using the box above. All new stories will be tagged with the date (format YYYY-M-D or 2013-1-1) and the names of persons, places, institutions, etc. mentioned in the article. This database feature will make it easier for those people wishing to find and re-read an article.  For anyone wishing to view previous day's pages, you may click on the "Previous Day's Pages" link in the menu at the top of the page, or search by date (YYYY-M-D format) using the box above.

Comment Policy:  When an article or poll is open for comments feel free to leave one.  Please remember to be respectful when you comment (no foul or hateful language, no racial slurs, etc) and keep our comments safe for work and children. .Comments are moderated and comments that contain explicit or hateful words will be deleted.  IP addresses are tracked for comments. 

EmporiaNews.com serves Emporia and Greensville County, Virginia and the surrounding area
and is provided as a community service by the Advertisers and Sponsors.
All material on EmporiaNews.com is copyright 2005-2016
EmporiaNews.com is powered by Drupal and based on the ThemeBrain Sirate Theme.

Submit Your Story!

Emporia News welcomes your submissions!  You may submit articles, announcements, school or sports information using the submission forms found here, or via e-mail on news@emporianews.com.  Currently, photos and advertisements will still be accepted only via e-mail, but if you have photos to go along with your submission, you will receive instructions via e-mail. If you have events to be listed on the Community Calendar, submit them here.

Contact us at news@emporianews.com
 
EmporiaNews.com is hosted as a community Service by Telpage.  Visit their website at www.telpage.net or call (434)634-5100 (NOTICE: Telpage cannot help you with questions about Emporia New nor does Teplage have any input the content of Emporia News.  Please use the e-mail address above if you have any questions, comments or concerns about the content on Emporia News.)