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April 2019

GREENSVILLE/EMPORIA DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES

LOCAL BOARD MEETING

The Greensville/Emporia Department of Social Services Administrative Board will hold its regular meeting Thursday, June 20, 2019, at 3:30 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Greensville/Emporia Department of Social Services located at 1748 East Atlantic Street.

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Panther Prep Day is Apri 16, 2019

Panther Prep Advising Day is coming back to Southside Virginia.   This event, sponsored by Southside Virginia Community College, will be held Tuesday, April 16, 2019 at various locations.  This is a chance for students to meet their advisors, register for classes, learn about all the programs and services the college has to offer.

Event hours at Christanna Campus in Alberta, John H. Daniel Campus in Keysville,  Southern Virginia Higher Education Center in South Boston, Estes Community Center in Chase City, and  Lake Country Advanced Knowledge Center in South Hill are from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m.

The Southside Virginia Education Center in Emporia will host the event from 2 p.m. until 6 p.m.

For more information on the event, call 434 736 2022. 

William E. Ivey, III

Visitation Memorial Service

Saturday May 4, 2019, 2:00 pm

J. M. WHITE FUNERAL HOME

60 Zeb Robinson Rd

Henderson, N. C. 27536

 

Saturday May 4, 2019, 1:00 pm

J. M. WHITE FUNERAL HOME

60 Zeb Robinson Rd

Henderson, N. C. 27536

HENDERSON-William Edward Ivey, III, age 37, a resident of 140 Dabney Woods Lane, passed away on Thursday, April 25, 2019.  Born on May 8, 1981 in Petersburg, VA, he was the son of William Edward "Buck" Ivey, Jr. of Emporia, VA and Sherry Taylor Fraunfelter of Jarratt, VA.  He proudly served his country in the United States Army serving in Korea and Iraq.   He was a Correctional Officer at the Federal Bureau of Prisons in Butner. Will was a devoted husband and father, loved to travel, and was an avid bow hunter and fisherman.

A memorial service will be held Saturday, May 4, 2019 at 2 pm in the J. M. White Funeral Home Chapel by Pastor Ken Thrasher.

He is survived by his wife, Shannon Lucy Ivey of the home; his daughter, Kristen Michele Ivey of the home; one sister, Melissa Harrison of Jarratt, VA ; his step-mother, Anita Ivey of Emporia, VA; two step sisters, Kelli Powell of Skippers, VA and Amanda Temple of Emporia, VA and families; several nieces and nephews; his father-in-law,

David Lucy of Dolphin, VA; mother-in-law, Sandra Griffin of Blackstone, VA; brother-in-law Shawn Lucy of Emporia, VA; sister-in-law, Crystal Redd of Coats, NC and families; and special friends, Daniel Thrasher and Steve Lewis.   

The family will receive friends prior to the service on Saturday from 1 until 2 pm and immediately following the service at J. M. White Funeral Home.  At other times they will be at the home.

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Wounded Warrior Project, PO Box 758517, Topeka, Kansas, 666-75-8517.

CSI: Career Scene Investigation 2019

Special Summer Camp for Middle School Students

South Hill—No, we’re not investigating crime scenes, we’re exploring the world of health care.  Area Middle School students in Mecklenburg, Lunenburg and Brunswick Counties will have the opportunity to attend a unique program at VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital in South Hill that will introduce them to a broad range of health careers.

A special, one-week, summer camp has been planned for the last week in July entitled, “CSI: Career Scene Investigation” and will focus on the many exciting career opportunities that are available in health care.  Partnering with Southside Virginia Community College, and thanks to VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital, fifteen middle school students who have an interest in a health career will be chosen to attend this summer health care camp during the week of July 29 to August 2.  

The camp will be offered at no charge to students.  During this week-long camp, students will spend time with staff from many clinical areas and have “hands-on” opportunities.  They will learn how to apply casts and splints, take x-rays, learn about monitoring the heart, spend time in the Emergency Department, dress in scrubs and see the Operating Rooms, learn how to suture, work with Rehabilitation therapists and much, much more!  The week will be fun, interactive, and exciting for the students and VCU CMH staff.

“We are very pleased to offer to area students this excellent opportunity to learn about the world of healthcare,” said Hazel Willis, RN, BSN, Education Department Manager for VCU-CMH.  “The program will offer a variety of activities that will allow students to observe and interact with health care professionals in their work environment and gain valuable insight into health care careers.  We want to provide a positive learning experience for students and encourage teens to explore health care careers.”

According to Mrs. Willis, health care careers are the fastest growing, and will be the most in demand careers for the future. Rapid technological and scientific advances in the medical field, along with a large aging population, have created high demand for health care professionals.  The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects the growth rate of new jobs in the health care professions will be twice the rate of job growth in non-healthcare professions. The Bureau of Labor Statistics also predicts a need for 5.3 million health care workers to fill job openings created by departures and new positions in the next five years.

During the middle school years is the ideal time to reach students and introduce them to career ideas so they can begin to plan a curriculum that includes the necessary sciences and other required courses.

A total of fifteen students from the Middle Schools with at least a C average will be selected to attend the camp from applications that include a short essay about why they want to attend the camp, and from teacher/guidance counselor recommendations.  Breakfast and lunch will be provided daily for the students.  Transportation to and from VCU Health -CMH will be the responsibility of the student’s parents.  Students will receive a backpack with supplies and a CSI: Career Scene Investigation T-shirt.  Parents will be invited to attend a special graduation ceremony at the conclusion of the week.

Applications for the camp may be obtained through each school’s guidance counselor or online at www.vcu-cmh.org.  For more information, or for an application, please call Hazel Willis in the Education Department at CMH at (434) 584-5438. 

Demystifying Munchausen’s Syndrome by Proxy

By Serena Fischer, Capital News Service

Recent programs such as Hulu’s “The Act” and the HBO documentary “Mommy Dead and Dearest” have introduced audiences to a dangerous and often overlooked phenomenon: Munchausen’s syndrome by proxy.

It is a mental health problem in which a caregiver causes an illness or injury to a vulnerable person – often a child. The disorder is difficult to diagnose and treat. Here are key facts about Munchausen syndrome by proxy, or MSBP.

What is it?

The symptoms of MSBP manifest as child or elder abuse, depending on the circumstances. Officials at the National Institutes of Health describe MSBP as “a special form of child abuse in which an adult repeatedly produces symptoms of illness in a person under his/her care.”

Health professionals distinguish MSBP from Munchausen syndrome, a condition in which people intentionally harm themselves or purposely self-induce illness to satisfy a desire to be cared for. With MSBP, the perpetrator (often a mother) will inflict such symptoms on a child or elder as a way to inspire sympathy from others.

The methods used to garner such attention from others can range from simple lies about an illness to actual physical harm — even poisoning — of the victim.

Health officials say the victim may have been initially healthy but face the risk of becoming seriously ill or even dying in the care of someone with MSBP.

Studies cited by the NIH report a mortality rate between 6% and 10% for MSBP victims, making it one of the “most lethal forms of abuse.”

The current medical term for such an illness is Factitious Disorder Imposed on Another, although it is more commonly referred to as MSBP. The phenomenon is relatively rare in the U.S. — making up just 1,000 of the approximately 2.5 million cases of child abuse reported annually.

Health experts said it is notoriously difficult to identify and properly treat Munchausen’s syndrome by proxy. People with the disorder are known to be great liars and master manipulators.

One method they use is to alter medical tests and results to make it seem as if the person in their care is sicker than they truly are. People with MSBP can get away with this, health experts say, because they often are familiar with medical terms and concepts.

This could explain why many cases of abuse caused by people with MSBP can go undetected by medical staff and law enforcement for long periods of time.

Online organizations such as the Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy Survivor Support and Awareness Group on Facebook provide those affected by MSBP with a community to vent and to heal.

Cases in Virginia

Two cases of MSBP involving young mothers in Virginia have been publicized in recent years. In both instances, the perpetrator was arrested on child abuse charges.

One case involved a 23-year-old woman whose 3-year-old son was being treated in 2016 at the Children’s Hospital of the King’s Daughters in Norfolk for “ongoing medical issues.”

The woman was arrested after video surveillance from her son’s room showed the young mother allegedly detaching medical equipment being used to give the boy vital medicine. The judge overseeing her case said there was reason to believe the woman gave doctors false information about her child’s medical records.

Earlier this year, 29-year-old Elizabeth Malone admitted to purposely poisoning her 5-year-old son with syringes of her own blood while he was being treated at Inova Fairfax Hospital last spring. She said she did so because she “liked the way staff responded to him once he was bleeding.” Video footage from a security camera shows Malone injecting blood into her son’s IV line and tracheostomy tube.

Had she not been caught, according to doctors, it is likely that her child would have died from the injections, which resulted in high fevers and infections. Malone, who has two other children, will be sentenced in July.

Gypsy Rose Blanchard: Stranger than Fiction

Such an illness may seem too bizarre to be true, but the disorder can result in major consequences, for both the caregiver and patient. No case may demonstrate this better than the conviction of Gypsy Rose Blanchard for the murder of her mother Dee Dee.

The Blanchards, who lived in Greene County, Missouri, were the subject of “The Act” and “Mommy Dead and Dearest.”

Dee Dee Blanchard’s MSBP was reportedly so severe that she forced her daughter Gypsy to use a wheelchair, despite knowing that the girl could walk without difficulty.

Dee Dee lied to Gypsy about her age, telling her she was 14 when she was actually 18 or 19. She also told doctors Gypsy had the mental capacity of a 7-year-old. This allowed the mother to keep Gypsy under her control for as long as possible.

Dee Dee reportedly used manipulation and medical jargon to keep her daughter powerless. She shaved Gypsy’s head and told her, and others, that she had leukemia. As a young girl, Gypsy’s salivary glands were removed at the insistence of her mother, and the child required a feeding tube.

Dee Dee also made Gypsy use a breathing machine while she slept. This combination of feigned illnesses rendered Gypsy a hostage in her own home.

After conspiring with a man she met online named Nicholas Godejohn, the two came up with a plan to murder Dee Dee. Godejohn stabbed Dee Dee to death before the pair fled to his Wisconsin home and were soon tracked down by the police.

Godejohn was found guilty of first-degree murder in 2018. He will spend the rest of his life in prison.

Gypsy pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in 2016. She was sentenced to 10 years in prison and will be eligible for parole in 2024.

6 Businesses Win Funds to Address Coastal Flooding

By Kal Weinstein and Owen FitzGerald, Capital News Service

RICHMOND — Six businesses will receive $1.5 million in funding as part of the first RISE Coastal Community Resilience Challenge.

With the winning funds, the businesses will create innovative technologies, services and workforce development programs to help communities along Virginia’s coastlines adapt to impending climate change.

The winners, which will receive between $160,000 and $310,000, were chosen from a pool of 51 applicants, Gov. Ralph Northam announced last week.

“As we continue to look at new ways to address the growing challenge of extreme weather events and sea level rise,” Northam said, “these six businesses will be leading the charge to develop, test and demonstrate cutting-edge products and tangible solutions to improve the resilience of our coastal communities and mitigate the growing risks to Virginians, especially in our Hampton Roads region.”

In 2017, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development awarded Virginia $120.5 million through the National Disaster Resilience Competition for solutions to combat sea-level rise in the Hampton Roads region. From that award, HUD provided $5.25 for the creation of RISE, a Norfolk-based nonprofit that provides resources and practical solutions for businesses in coastal communities.

The Coastal Community Resilience Challenge is the first initiative created by RISE. It received $1.5 million from the Resilience Innovation Fund.

RISE’s executive director, Paul Robinson, understands the magnitude of the work the organization is doing.

“Massive infrastructure projects take years and billions of dollars,” Robinson said. “By developing the Hampton Roads region as a hub of resilience innovation for entrepreneurs, we can accelerate investment in affordable and scalable solutions and establish Hampton Roads as ground zero for the resilience economy.”

Last November, Northam issued an executive order aimed at improving Virginia’s resilience to sea-level rise. It seeks to limit the harmful impacts of flooding, extreme weather events and wildfires.

Virginia officials have called the executive order one of the most significant actions by any state to improve resilience and provide protection and relief for natural disasters.

Adm. Ann Phillips, a special assistant to the governor for coastal adaptation and protection, praised the efforts of the RISE organization.

“Thanks to the hard work and success of RISE, these six entrepreneurs bring creative solutions across a range of today’s needs for our coastal communities, which will help make us more resilient as we prepare for our climate-changed future,” Phillips said.

RISE will continue to work with the six businesses, two of which will relocate from out of state to the Hampton Roads area.

The winners of the Coastal Community Resilience Challenge are:

  • Building Resilience Solutions, which will work on alternative flood resilience retrofit methods for older and historic structures against various flooding conditions.
  • Constructis Energy, which will facilitate the patenting of technology that harnesses kinetic energy from traffic to provide power to services that clear flooded roadways.
  • GROW Oyster Reefs, which will work on oyster reef restoration. This would improve the water quality of the Chesapeake Bay and help combat flooding by creating an organic seawall.
  • InfraSGA, which will build urban retrofit bio-retention systems that will decrease stormwater flooding while reducing design, construction, operation and maintenance costs.
  • Landscape Resilience Partnership, which will expedite the adoption of green infrastructure through the growth of its workforce training program. Its goal is ensuring that Hampton Roads has a network of skilled workers to design, install and maintain nature-based solutions.
  • Resilient Enterprise Solutions, which will provide financing, insurance and home-raising as a single source. In addition, the company will establish the Home Raising Training Academy in Hampton Roads.

More information about the winners and the next competition cycle can be found at www.riseresilience.org.

"Pass the Patience"

Now patience hath no young boy
at least so I've been told
yet patience may be the last remain
when like me; you do get old.
 
Yes patience for at least to try
doing things you done well before
then there's patience just to move around
for it now takes a while more.
 
Patience with all of your friendships
for those once close; may now seem strange
yes during the length of time gone by
some of them did also change.
 
Have patience with your aches and pains
that may follow you each day
your strength and body of the past
has no quarantee to stay.
 
Always be patient with those around you
for the most don't understand
yet one day they'll be in your boat
and rowing with one hand.
 
                         - Roy E. Schepp

Virginia Coastal Towns Brace for Rising Sea Level

By Kal Weinstein and Owen FitzGerald, Capital News Service

WACHAPREAGUE, Va. — The tide is high, but this seaside town is holding on.

As the owner and operator of Seaside Eco-tours, Capt. Meriwether Payne ferries passengers from the Wachapreague Town Marina to the barrier islands just beyond the marshes of the shoreline village. The nature surrounding Virginia’s Eastern Shore is the heart of her business, but the rising sea level and the resulting increase in coastal flooding are threatening Payne’s excursions.

“There seems to be more and more days when we have to walk through water to get to the dock or have to move to a dock other than the town marina to pick up customers,” Payne said.

The Nature Conservancy of Virginia hosted a community event last month to discuss the impacts of sea-level rise in Accomack County, which encompasses the northern half of Virginia’s Eastern Shore and the approximately 200 residents of Wachapreague. At the meeting, Payne said it’s difficult getting customers to her boat during high tide.

Residents heard from the Accomack-Northampton Planning District Commission and staff from the Nature Conservancy, who spoke about planning for and responding to climate change. However, some on the Eastern Shore are skeptical about the severity of the issue.

“You will find that there are a large percentage of people on the shore that do not think anything is going to affect them in their lifetime — particularly older folks,” Payne said.

The effects of these environmental hazards are apparent more than ever on Tangier Island, which sits in the Chesapeake Bay. It has lost 67 percent of its landmass since 1850, with much of the remaining landmass expected to be underwater within the next 50 years, forcing residents to abandon their homes.

Cedar Island, in the Atlantic Ocean just off the coast of Wachapreague, is one of many barrier islands guarding the coasts of Virginia. It is a frequent destination on Payne’s tours.

For decades, the island housed dozens of residents who built homes on the land. But like Tangier, the sea slowly claimed the beaches and surrounding marshland. Some homes were lost as well. Other homeowners took it upon themselves to uproot their houses and move them inland where they would be safe. The last house was removed from the island in 2015.

Also residing in Wachapreague is the Eastern Shore Laboratory of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science. The lab acts as a station for teaching as well as a site for research. While it exists primarily to study coastal ecology and marine life, the scientists there are well aware of the changes going on around them.

Richard Snyder, the lab’s director and an Eastern Shore resident, said the rise in sea level is nothing new for coastal areas of Virginia.

“Sea level has never been static. It’s always been going up and down,” Snyder said. “Now, it’s just matter of how well we adapt to it.”

The institute is changing in response to the rise in sea level, much like the residents of Cedar Island. They’re in the beginning stages of a building campaign that would move a number of administrative and research buildings inland to an area known as the “Wachapreague Highlands” because it is slightly more elevated than the surrounding area. Other buildings will be lifted and placed on stilts so they can withstand flooding that threatens their foundations.

In 2012, VIMS completed the new Seawater Laboratory in Wachapreague. With an eye toward the future, the lab was built to withstand a 13-foot storm surge. Snyder said it’s the safest building in hundreds of miles during a flood.

Snyder acknowledged that building and development in areas that are likely to be affected by flooding and sea-level rise are still occurring at an alarming rate. While some people are preparing for the worst, others are not as mindful.

“We need to be planning, and we need to be addressing these issues,” Snyder said. “But there are people going the exact opposite direction — still promoting building and investment in infrastructure in areas that in 50 years may not be viable.”

Everyone has a stake in the issue — even if they don’t own property on the coast.

“Now we have backed and invested in development in areas that flood by providing federal flood insurance,” Snyder said. “And we all now are on the hook for billions of dollars of infrastructure that’s at risk because the government has supported it and allowed loans and development in areas where honestly, we probably should never have built.”

Besides VIMS, other researchers are tracking environmental changes. They include a federal project called the U.S. Global Change Research Program.

The program recently issued its Climate Science Special Report. The study shows that globally, sea level has risen roughly 7-8 inches since 1900, with about 3 inches occurring since 1993. The report projects that sea level will rise an additional 4 to 8 inches by 2030.

Recent projections from the VIMS Center for Coastal Resources Management approximate a possible “extreme” sea-level rise on the Eastern Shore between 4.5 and 7 feet by the year 2100. That is three to four times the expected global average.

Of the roughly 15,000 homes in Accomack County, officials estimate that more than 7,700 are less than 5 feet above sea level and are therefore at a greater risk of flooding. Nearly $900 million worth of property — including churches, schools and medical facilities — are also in the range of the estimated extreme sea-level rise, according to an analysis by Climate Central, a nonprofit research group funded by private foundations.

In 2017, Virginia received a $120.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to combat sea-level rise in Hampton Roads. The funds helped create a nonprofit group called RISE, dedicated to solving environmental problems facing coastal communities.

Last week, Gov. Ralph Northam announced $1.5 million in funding for six winners of the first RISE Coastal Community Resilience Challenge. The winners will use the money to develop innovative products, services and workforce development programs designed to aid communities in adapting to climate change.

“The commonwealth is well-positioned to create and implement innovative adaptive concepts that will ensure the viability and economic vitality of coastal areas for future generations,” Northam said.

Citizens like Snyder and Payne remain optimistic in the face of not only rising waters but also skepticism many Americans have voiced about climate change.

“I think you’ve got a lot of people that don’t believe it,” Payne said. “Fortunately, my boat floats on top of whatever the sea level rises to.”

Campaign to End Plastic Straw Use Comes to VCU

By Jasmine Cruz, Capital News Service

RICHMOND — As national discussion swirls around the environmental impact of plastic, a group at Virginia Commonwealth University recently launched a campaign hoping to end plastic straw use on campus.

Dr. Ching-Yu Huang, an instructor in the VCU Department of Biology, brought the “Kick the Straw” campaign to campus. Her husband, Dr. Justin Ellis, previously started the campaign at Longwood University, where he is a faculty member and assistant director of Clean Virginia Waterways.

“Faculty can tell you what to do, but if [the] student doesn’t have the motivation to do that, it’s not going to work,” Huang said. Her students are leading the project, though she remains present for questions and assistance.

The campaign has partnered with Simply Straws, a California-based company that manufactures reusable straws.

Huang hopes people will establish lifelong habits by making a small change in their daily lives, such as refusing to use plastic straws.

“Our world has become accustomed to using plastic straws in exchange for a minimal convenience,” said Katherine Peterman, a VCU student helping lead Kick the Straw. Peterman wrote over email that the campaign is to educate people about sustainability and to become aware of the waste they create.

VCU is the third Virginia university to join the Simply Straws Pledge Against Plastic Straws Campus Challenge. Old Dominion University and Longwood also are participating in the campaign.

According to the Simply Straws website, the Campus Challenge pairs the company with schools and asks students to pledge to stop using plastic straws. The campaign includes K-12 schools as well as colleges and universities. There is a prize of 100 custom-etched glass straws to the school that has the most pledges by the end of April.

When a student pledges, Simply Straws sends them a free glass straw. Over a person’s lifetime, the use of a reusable straw prevents 30,000 straws from ending up in a landfill or waterways, according to the company.

Clean Virginia Waterways sponsors events to remove litter from rivers and beaches, Ellis noted.

“Most years, since we’ve been working with citizens … straws is consistently in the top 10 items that we find during those cleanups,” Ellis said.

He said Aramark, a food-service and facility management company serving more than 5 million students, including those at Longwood and VCU, gave 500 metal straws as gifts to commuters who bought a meal plan.

Aramark and Ellis are currently working together to end the use of plastic straws at Longwood campus dining locations, either by everyone carrying a reusable straw or cafeterias offering paper straws.

Ellis said the Aramark director told him Longwood could be free of plastic straws by next fall. In 2018, Aramark announced a single-use plastic reduction strategy that included phasing out plastic straws and stirrers. The food-service giant predicted its efforts would create a 60% decrease in plastic straws by 2020.

All of VCU’s 20-plus dining locations provide plastic straws.

“Our campaign will eventually try to get VCU food vendors on board,” Peterman said. She said campaign members have reached out to local businesses that offer alternatives, such as paper and corn straws, to receive guidance on how to get other businesses to participate.

Kick the Straw campaign events take place throughout the month. The next event is Party for the Planet, which will be held Saturday at Historic Tredegar, 500 Tredegar St.

To take the pledge not to use plastic straws, visit the VCU registration pagehttps://simplystraws.com/pages/VCU.

Global Expert Panel Discusses Worldwide Politics

By Benjamin West, Capital News Service

RICHMOND — Experts from around the world gathered for a panel discussion at Virginia Commonwealth University to educate the public about the strengths and weaknesses of worldwide election systems, their similarities and differences to U.S. political procedures, and thoughts on the betterment of global democracy.

“Electoral Systems Around the World” hosted four speakers who were from or had extensive knowledge about countries such as Uruguay, South Africa, Zambia and Colombia. The panel took place in VCU’s Globe Building, an experimental hybrid of both residential and educational facilities.

The speakers at Wednesday’s event were:

  • Lefate MaKunyane of Johannesburg, South Africa, a Humphrey Fellow, or visiting scholar, whose studies of interest include youth development programs, gender-based violence and mental health and substance use prevention.
  • Marcelo Martoy of Montevideo, Uruguay, a Humphrey Fellow and legal advisor to the National Drug Board of the Presidency of the Republic of Uruguay, where he is helping to redirect money confiscated from drug trafficking back into the community in the form of substance abuse prevention, education and other civic programs.
  • Sombo Chunda of Zambia, a government doctoral student, and former country manager in Zambia with Diakonia, a Swedish nonprofit humanitarian organization. Her interests and areas of study include democracy, economic development, gender equality and conflict resolution.
  • Michael A. Paarlberg, a VCU political science assistant professor and expert on Latin American politics. His research interests include immigration and labor law.

To open, the speakers each outlined the generalities of their country’s political system. Some results were standard and uniform: All of the countries have five-year political cycles. Voters consist of both men and women who are 18 years or older. No country has monetary or property ownership restrictions.

There are some stark differences among the countries represented by the panel. While most of the discussed counties have low voter turnout, at or around 50%, Martoy revealed that, because of its mandatory voter laws, Uruguay recently saw a national election with more than 90% of citizens participating.

In Uruguay, according to Martoy, nonvoters not only face a fine, but they also are denied registration for public schools, and public workers cannot receive some payments, among other things.

Following country-by-country breakdowns, the speakers outlined unique characteristics of their political systems, garnered from their research.

MaKunyane spoke of the movement to change the South African constitution to “address the imbalances of the past” when the white minority drove black people from large swaths of land — an imbalance that he said is still felt today.

There is rising tension even in the U.S., where MaKunyane said Fox News has been framing the issue as a lynching of white people. And young people, generations removed from Nelson Mandela, are becoming increasingly militant, he said.

“Unfortunately, if we don’t address this challenge, it’s going to turn into a serious civil war,” he said.

Paarlberg spoke about voter fraud, an issue often vehemently discussed by the U.S. public during election season, and how some countries deal with it. He said that in Colombia, election authorities count up the number of people who voted and the number of ballots in the box. When there is a discrepancy, they take out the extra number of ballots at random and burn them on the spot.

Chunda, who has devoted much time and effort toward including women in Zambia’s politics, spoke at length about the systematic challenges women face when approaching candidacy.

“The system is structured to favor men,” she said.

Chunda has worked with nonprofits urging Zambia’s political parties to devote 50% of their ticket to women, though she stressed that it is institutional inequalities — such as lack of education and exclusive child-rearing roles — that truly bar women from the podium.

Ultimately, the panel was asked what they thought of the U.S. political system.

“My personal impression is that the United States has many contradictions,” Martoy said.

He pointed to institutions such as democracy, freedom of the press and civil rights as positive examples, but also mentioned voter disenfranchisement, gerrymandering and disproportional influence of large corporations — sentiments echoed by most of the panel.

The consensus was that listening and learning about politics on a global scale will help combat systemic injustices — and even unite seemingly distant people.

“I think that there’s need for civic education even here in the U.S.,” Chunda said.

VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital Earns ACR Accreditation

VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital has been awarded a three-year term of accreditation in mammography as the result of a recent review by the American College of Radiology (ACR). Mammography is a specific type of imaging test that uses a low-dose X-ray system to examine breasts. A mammography exam, called a mammogram, is used to aid in the early detection and diagnosis of breast diseases in women.

"The ACR performs a thorough evaluation of our policies, staff qualifications, interpretations, image quality, and equipment performance,” said Wendy Lenhart, Radiology Director. “Our accredited status gives our referring providers and patients the assurance that our Breast Imaging program at CMH is top notch."

The mammography department has been accredited since 1994, Lenhart said.

The ACR gold seal of accreditation represents the highest level of image quality and patient safety. It is awarded only to facilities meeting ACR Practice Parameters and Technical Standards after a peer-review evaluation by board-certified physicians and medical physicists who are experts in the field. Image quality, personnel qualifications, adequacy of facility equipment, quality control procedures and quality assurance programs are assessed. The findings are reported to the ACR Committee on Accreditation, which subsequently provides the practice with a comprehensive report that can be used for continuous practice improvement.

The ACR, founded in 1924, is a professional medical society dedicated to serving patients and society by empowering radiology professionals to advance the practice, science and professions of radiological care. The College serves more than 37,000 diagnostic/interventional radiologists, radiation oncologists, nuclear medicine physicians, and medical physicists with programs focusing on the practice of medical imaging and radiation oncology and the delivery of comprehensive health care services.

Correctional Officers Honored at 11th Annual Banquet

Southside Virginia Community College recently hosted the 11th Annual Corrections Awards Banquet at the Christanna Campus in Alberta to recognize Officer and Employee of the year from area correctional facilities.  The event was sponsored by Lawrenceville Correctional Center and the guest speaker was Mr. Harold W. Clarke, Director of the Virginia Department of Corrections.  Those receiving recognition are (Front Row, Left to Right) Officer Shelyne Smith of Lunenburg Correctional, Christine Watkins of Lunenburg Correctional, Shelia Booker of Diillwyn Correctional, Officer Daphne Andrews of Lawrenceville Correctional, Officer Myesha Gaines of Buckingham Correctional, Officer Michael Boone of Deerfield Correctional, Lt. Ronald Gallimore of Halifax Correctional, Lt. Aaron Benny of Greenville Correctional, Officer Milicent Clayton of Nottoway Correctional and Dr. Alfonzo Seward, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice at SVCC and (Back Row, L to RO)Tiffany Robinson of Lawrenceville Correctional, Officer Edward Tolbert of Dillwyn Correctional, Sandra Garner-Coleman of Halifax Correctional, Linda Peete-Pierce of Greensville Correctional, Veesa Gough of Buckingham Correctional, Destiny Johnson of Nottoway Correctional.  Those who were unable to attend are Officer Jennifer Ksor and Dennis Yohe or Baskerville Correctional and Sandra Banty of Deerfield Correctional.

Your Personal Guide to Richmond’s Thrift Shop Scene

By Arianna Coghill, Capital News Service

RICHMOND — Many consumers are turning to thrifting as an eco-friendly alternative to shopping at the mall.

Numerous resale boutiques and thrift shops have popped up in the Richmond area over the past few years, giving people more options than ever. With warm weather creeping upon us, now is an opportune time to update your summer wardrobe.

From Short Pump to Midlothian to Carytown, here are a few of the area’s many thrift shops.

If you’re looking for a place that has all the latest fashions for half the price, look no further than Rumors Boutique and 723 W. Broad St. Rumors has a blend of modern and vintage-style clothing, carrying everything from the Instagram-famous brand Fashion Nova to authentic pieces straight from the 1980s.

When it comes to sustainability, the store no longer hands out plastic bags to customers. Rumors even sells metal drinking straws that have become increasingly popular in the past year.

Buffalo Exchange is perhaps the newest addition to Richmond’s thrift store lineup, having opened in August. The chain was started in Tucson, Arizona, in 1974 and now has over 50 locations across 21 states.

The Buffalo Exchange at 3140 W. Cary St. is its first in Virginia. When it comes to style, the store's options are a bit more vintage-inspired than Rumors’. If that’s your brand of strawberry jam, go for it.

If you’re looking for something more on the refined, less grunge side, Ashby is the place for you. If you enjoy brands like ASOS and Free People, then Ashby at 3010 W. Cary St. might be your perfect match. It was voted one of the best clothing consignment/resale stores and best women's boutiques by readers of Richmond Magazine in 2018.

If you’re looking for something on the more mature side, try Ashby’s sister store, Clementine at 3118 W. Cary St. While Ashby is more directed at younger, more casual demographic, Clementine feels chicer, selling designer brands such as Chanel and Lululemon. With springtime in full swing, bright pastel colors and bold prints are very much in style. If that’s what you’re searching for, Clementine will have you covered.

Uptown Cheapskate, like Buffalo Exchange, is a nationwide chain. It began in 2009 in Utah and eventually spread across the country. The company has two locations in RVA: at 1403 Huguenot Road in Midlothian and at 4338 Pouncey Tract Road in Short Pump. If you enjoy Urban Outfitters, Uptown Cheapskate is a good match. Plus, Uptown claims its clothes are as much as 70 percent cheaper than mall prices.

SVCC FBLA Members Compete at State Leadership Conference

Southside Virginia Community College students Janet Wilson(Right) of Farmville and Kimberly Solomon(Left) of South Hill are in the Administrative Support Technology program. These students attended the FBLA-Phi Beta Lambda State Leadership Conference in Glen Allen on April 6, 2019 and competed against students from two- and four-year colleges across the state. Wilson placed first in Computer Applications. Solomon placed first in Administrative Technology and third in Business Communications. 

In addition to the competitions, the students and advisers participated in informative and engaging workshops on topics that included Keys to Getting the Job You Really Want, Emotional Intelligence, and Beyond Networking. 

Students were accompanied by PBL advisers, Crystal Jones and Elizabeth Burns.

Richmond Growing Faster Than State and Nation, New Data Shows

By Jayla Marie McNeill, Capital News Service

RICHMOND — So far this decade, the city of Richmond has increased in population more than neighboring suburban counties — and at twice the growth rate of the state and nation, according to population estimates released Thursday by the U.S. Census Bureau.

Since 2010, Richmond’s population has grown 12% — adding almost 24,500 people. The increase is due to the birth rate (the city had about 8,600 more births than deaths) as well as people moving to Richmond from parts of the U.S. (almost 10,200) and from other countries (about 5,400).

Of the 133 counties and cities in Virginia, only 12 have grown more than Richmond has this decade. Richmond has grown more than Chesterfield County (10.2%), Hanover County (7.4%) and Henrico County (7.3%).

The population of the Richmond metropolitan statistical area — which consists of Richmond, 13 counties from Amelia to New Kent, and the cities of Petersburg, Hopewell and Colonial Heights — increased 8.1% since 2010. In 2018, the area’s population topped 1.3 million, according to the Census Bureau’s estimates.

The Richmond region is the nation’s 44th most populous metropolitan area — up from 45th in 2010. In recent years, the Richmond area edged past the Louisville/Jefferson County metro area in Kentucky and Indiana.

Virginia’s overall population has increased by 6.5% this decade. It has surpassed 8.5 million — up more than 500,000 since 2010.

The entire U.S. population is about 327.2 million — an increase of 6% this decade.

Loudoun County is the fastest-growing locality in Virginia. Its population has jumped more than 30%, to almost 407,000, since 2010.

Nationwide, only 19 counties have grown more than Loudoun County this decade, the data showed.

Other fast-growing localities in Virginia are Manassas Park and New Kent County (up 21.5% since 2010), Fredericksburg (20.5%) and Falls Church (20.3%).

While the population is growing in Northern Virginia and the Richmond area, that is not the case in other areas of Virginia. In the western and southern regions of the commonwealth, the population has dropped significantly:

  • The City of Emporia, 11 miles north of the North Carolina line, has had a population decrease of about 800 people or 13.6% — the greatest percentage loss in the state this decade.
  • Buchanan County, bordering West Virginia and Kentucky, lost almost 2,900 residents — an 11.9% decrease.
  • Tazewell County, also in southwestern Virginia, saw its population drop by more than 4,200 residents, or 9.3%.

All in all, the Census Bureau’s data showed that 72 localities in Virginia gained population and 61 lost population since 2010.

The bureau conducts a national census every 10 years; it is getting ready to do a headcount in April 2020. In addition, the agency issues population estimates every year. The estimates are based on a variety of sources, including surveys and tax data.

Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center Announces Employee of the Quarter

Chris is presented the SVRMC Employee of the Quarter award.  Pictured, from left, are: Wilson Thomas, CEO, Chris Avent, Peggy Dunn, Director of Surgical Services and Susan Williams, CNO.

Emporia, VA – Chris Avent has been named the Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center (SVRMC) Employee of the Quarter. Mr. Avent, who works as a Certified Central Sterile Technician in SVRMC’s Surgical Services Department, has been employed at SVRMC since June 1978.

Each quarter employees are nominated for demonstrating excellence in any or all of ten Standards of Behavior.  Mr. Avent’s nomination included the following statement: “Chris has a sense of ownership and takes pride in his department.  This is evidenced by successful Joint Commission surveys and the numerous compliments from surveyors about Chris’ work. He shows a commitment to his co-workers by jumping into help when necessary and is responsive when assistance is needed. Chris has a positive attitude and is an asset to the facility.”

As SVRMC’s Employee of the Quarter, Mr. Avent received a certificate of recognition, balloons, cookies to share with his co-workers, a cash award, and a chance to be selected as SVRMC’s 2019 Employee of the Year.

Chris is presented the SVRMC Employee of the Quarter award.  Pictured, from left, are: Wilson Thomas, CEO, Chris Avent, Peggy Dunn, Director of Surgical Services and Susan Williams, CNO.

Muriel Johnson Doyle

Graveside Service

11:00 A.M. Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Emporia Cemetery

 

Muriel Johnson Doyle, 98, died Saturday, April 20, 2019.

A Virginia native, Muriel was the daughter of the late Lloyd Turner Johnson and Annie Bell Gray Johnson. She was a retired homemaker and a longtime member of Main Street Baptist Church. In addition to her parents she was preceded in death by her husband; Larry Doyle Jr., two daughters; Martha Woodbury and Mary Virginia Doyle, a grandson; Larry Wesson, and two sisters.

Muriel is survived by her two daughters; Judy Gibson and her husband Roger and Sue Creswell and her husband Benny, three sisters; Eleanor Gill, Nancy Johnson and Iris Royster, grandchildren; Tony Wesson, Katherine Gibson, Beth Boyter, Adam Temple, nine Great Grandchildren and two Great Great Grandchildren, and several nieces and nephews.

Graveside services will be at 11:00 A.M. Wednesday, April 24, 2019 in Emporia Cemetery with Dr. Rick Hurst officiating.

Online condolences may be left at echolsfuneralhome.com.

Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center Offers Imaging Technology with Hometown Quality Care

    

    

    

Emporia, VA – The imaging department at Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center (SVRMC) has radiology equipment you’d find in a big city hospital but offers quick appointment scheduling and hometown quality care you’d expect in a small town. Imaging services provide preventive care and diagnosis of diseases including cancer, acute injury and disorders of the bone and muscle. Onsite technology includes digital radiology, nuclear medicine, mammography, computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound with mobile magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) available on specific days of the week.

Part of the success of the department is due to the long-time leadership of Pamela Low, RT, the director of Imaging since 1979. Through her leadership, SVRMC achieved and continues to earn American College of Radiology Mammography accreditation – the only ACR accredited facility in the Emporia area. She has received multiple Manager of the Year awards.

When asked about her favorite part of the job, Pam says, “I enjoy taking care of the community where I was born and raised. I love taking care of seniors and developing relationships with patients who come back each year. We’re just a big family around here.”

To make an appointment have your physician fax an order to (434) 348-4964. To find a provider near you, visit our physician directory at SVRMC.com.

Virginia Trails Nation in Placing Foster Children With Relatives

By Caitlin Morris, Capital News Service

RICHMOND — Only 7% of Virginia’s foster children are placed with relatives, according to a new study — well below the national average of 32%.

The Annie E. Casey Foundation tracked changes in foster care in each state from 2007 to 2017. For Virginia, the data snapshot contained some good news: There were fewer children in foster care, and fewer foster children were placed in group homes.

But many experts say that ideally, foster children should be placed with relatives — and on that measure, Virginia did not make any progress over the 10 years.

“We want for children to have a family that is their family forever — whether it’s their family of origin or if their foster family turns into an adoptive home,” said Allison Gilbreath, a policy analyst at Voices for Virginia’s Children, a nonprofit advocacy program.

Over the 10-year period, Virginia was successful in decreasing the percentage of foster children in group homes from 23% to 17%. That means more children have been fostered in family settings — but just not with their own relatives. The data also shows that older youth are more likely to be in group homes.

Virginia was also successful in reducing the number of children entering foster care. In 2007, there were 7,665, compared with 4,795 in 2017.

“While we have reduced the number of children overall in foster care, black children in particular continue to be overrepresented both in family-based settings, but also particularly in group homes,” Gilbreath said. “We really need to spend some time and energy in the state and figure out what we can do that will specifically get at the racial inequities in the foster care system.”

This year’s Virginia General Assembly passed SB 1339 to bring Virginia in compliance with federal foster care regulations, including the federal Family First Prevention Services Act enacted in 2018. The act encourages states to keep children in family-based settings by redirecting federal funds to support services for at-risk children and their caregivers.

Virginia’s new law also aims to increase the number of children placed with family members by notifying relatives when a child enters foster care.

Voices for Virginia’s Children joined the Annie E. Casey Foundation in calling on child welfare systems to shift resources from group placements to family settings.

“They feel more loved and protected, and it’s a more normal experience for that child,” Gilbreath said. “But also, they’re more likely to achieve permanency that way, and that’s what we really want for kids.”

The organizations contend that the support system for other foster children and caregivers should also be available to relatives who take in children. This includes financial support and access to mental health support. Often, family members take in a child through what is known as kinship diversion, meaning they take in a child without using the foster system and don’t receive the same support as caregivers in the foster program.

The children’s advocacy groups also called for expansion of kinship navigator programs. These programs aim to help relative caregivers navigate the complex child welfare system. Under the Family First Prevention Services Act, additional federal funds have been made available for kinship navigator programs.

“Virginia has already started to take advantage of these funds but could adopt the programs statewide,” Voices for Virginia’s Children stated in a press release.

The organization and the Annie E. Casey Foundation also asked for increased access to services that would help stabilize families. By aligning legislation with the Family First Prevention Services Act, funds will be accessible for family support services to prevent at-risk children from entering the foster system.

“It’s going to provide the first-ever opportunity to have money used to prevent entry into foster care,” Gilbreath said. This funding will go toward programs that offer mental health support for the child and the caregivers, substance abuse treatment and in-home training in parenting skills for the family.

“If we were able to step in and provide that family support — we’d be able to make that family successful,” Gilbreath said.

Higher Limits Now Available on USDA Farm Loans

2018 Farm Bill Increases Limits and Makes Other Changes to Farm Loans

WASHINGTON, April 12, 2019 – Higher limits are now available for borrowers interested in USDA’s farm loans, which help agricultural producers purchase farms or cover operating expenses. The 2018 Farm Bill increased the amount that producers can borrow through direct and guaranteed loans available through USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) and made changes to other loans, such as microloans and emergency loans.

“As natural disasters, trade disruptions, and persistent pressure on commodity prices continue to impact agricultural operations, farm loans become increasingly important to farmers and ranchers,” FSA Administrator Richard Fordyce said. “The 2018 Farm Bill provides increased loan limits and more flexibility to farm loans, which gives producers more access to credit when they need it most.”

Key changes include:

  • The Direct Operating Loan limit increased from $300,000 to $400,000, and the Guaranteed Operating Loan limit increased from $ 1.429 million to $1.75 million. Operating loans help producers pay for normal operating expenses, including machinery and equipment, seed, livestock feed, and more.
  • The Direct Farm Ownership Loan limit increased from $300,000 to $600,000, and the Guaranteed Farm Ownership Loan limit increased from $1.429 million to $1.75 million. Farm ownership loans help producers become owner-operators of family farms as well as improve and expand current operations.
  • Producers can now receive both a $50,000 Farm Ownership Microloan and a $50,000 Operating Microloan. Previously, microloans were limited to a combined $50,000. Microloans provide flexible access to credit for small, beginning, niche, and non-traditional farm operations.
  • Producers who previously received debt forgiveness as part of an approved FSA restructuring plan are now eligible to apply for emergency loans. Previously, these producers were ineligible.
  • Beginning and socially disadvantaged producers can now receive up to a 95 percent guarantee against the loss of principal and interest on a loan, up from 90 percent.

About Farm Loans

Direct farm loans, which include microloans and emergency loans, are financed and serviced by FSA, while guaranteed farm loans are financed and serviced by commercial lenders. For guaranteed loans, FSA provides a guarantee against possible financial loss of principal and interest.

For more information on FSA farm loans, visit www.fsa.usda.gov or contact your local USDA service center.

USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer and lender.

Helen Frances Horne

April 29, 1923 - April 19, 2019

Visitation Services

Wednesday, April 24th, 1:00 pm

High Hills Baptist Church

215 South Halifax Road
Jarratt, Virginia

Wednesday, April 24th, 2:00 pm

High Hills Baptist Church

215 South Halifax Road
Jarratt, Virginia

Helen Frances Horne, 95, of Jarratt, Virginia died Friday, April 19, 2019 at Manorhouse Assisted Living, Henrico, Virginia. Helen was a lifelong resident of Jarratt and was a member of High Hills Baptist Church her entire life. She was born on April 29, 1923.

Helen was the youngest child of Jasper Person Horne and Helen Rochette Grigg Horne. She was preceded in death by her parents and her seven siblings; Daisy Horne Finney (Jarratt), Humphrey Horne (Emporia), Richard “Dick” Horne (Jarratt), Josiah B. Horne (Bluefield,WV), Lucy Horne Woodruff, (Rocky Mt. NC), Mamie Horne Briley (Jarratt), and Jasper (Sam) P. Horne Jr (Richmond). Nieces and nephews who predeceased her were Virginia Finney (Jarratt), Dorothy Finney Hall (Jarratt), David A.Woodruff (Wilmington NC) and Robert Woodruff (Jarratt). She is survived by two nieces, Elizabeth Horne Thomas (Midlothian), Patricia Horne Dresser (Vienna) and one nephew, J.P. (Jack) Horne III (Richmond).

A graduate of Jarratt High School, Helen joined the Home Telephone Company where she later became a Training Specialist that allowed her to be assigned to many localities throughout Virginia. She retired from Contel of Virginia (formally, Home Telephone Co) with 37 years of service. Helen has remained close to her company friends and met with them often at various events. She loved to travel, toured this country and others on wide ranging trips and developed a new group of highly regarding friends. Helen was a meticulous artist of significant repute. Her paintings and handwork are broadly represented in the community. She was in demand for commissioned paintings in oil as well.

As she grew older, care was provided by her nieces and nephew as well as many friends, for which she was grateful. Of special note is the immediate family of the late Bob Woodruff, specifically his wife, Mary, and their children who were Helen’s principal caregivers. Helen will be remembered for her quick wit and sense of humor which will be sorely missed by all who knew her. Dr. Andy Brockelman, will conduct the service 2 p.m. Wednesday, April 24th at High Hills Baptist Church, followed by interment in the church cemetery. The family will receive friends one hour prior to the service in the fellowship hall. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be the charity of your choice.

Online condolences may be shared with the family at www.owenfh.com

VCU School of Nursing opens accelerated path to a bachelors to Rappahannock and Southside Virginia Community Colleges

RICHMOND, Va. (April 16, 2019) — The Virginia Commonwealth University School of Nursing has partnered with Southside Virginia Community College and Rappahannock Community College to offer accelerated coursework to registered nurses who are students at both community colleges, providing them a faster path to obtaining a bachelor’s degree. Students will be enrolled concurrently at VCU and their respective community colleges.

“We’re looking forward to offering SVCC and RCC nursing students a more efficient path to earn a bachelor’s of science degree in nursing, which subsequently will help to increase the number of baccalaureate-prepared RNs in Virginia’s health care workforce,” said Jean Giddens, Ph.D., dean of the VCU School of Nursing.

The partnerships are in line with a national push to enhance academic progression for nurses. In 2010, the Institute of Medicine released “The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health” report, which recommended that 80 percent of the nursing workforce be educated at a baccalaureate degree in nursing or higher by 2020. Reduction in medication errors, lower mortality rates and positive patient outcomes are linked to nurses being educated at baccalaureate and higher degree levels, according to a recent position statement by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. 

Enrollment will open on May 1 to nursing students at both community colleges and classes will start in fall 2019. Enrolled students will complete six credits of baccalaureate courses during their last year at either community college and subsequently complete the remaining credits online through the VCU School of Nursing.

Both VCU and SVCC aim to increase the number of baccalaureate-prepared nurses who might seek employment at VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital in South Hill, Virginia, and other health care facilities in Southside Virginia, said Michelle Edmonds, DNP, dean of nursing, allied health and natural sciences at Southside Virginia Community College.

“This partnership brings world-class baccalaureate education to the communities of Southside Virginia,” Edmonds said. “Additionally, the partnership will increase the number of baccalaureate-prepared registered nurses to Southside Virginia. I am certain that SVCC and VCU will together advance the health of this region.”

The agreement with Rappahannock Community College will provide nursing students in eastern Virginia with more extensive educational opportunities, said Ellen Koehler, an associate professor of nursing for Rappahannock Community College.

“This concurrent enrollment agreement with VCU School of Nursing is an extraordinary opportunity for the students of the Northern Neck and Middle Peninsula region,” Koehler said. “This affords our students the opportunity to enhance their career goals toward a bachelor’s degree in nursing from a prestigious school that values advancing the profession of nursing.”

Think Tank Warns Against Raising Cigarette Taxes

By Andrew Gionfriddo, Capital News Service

 

RICHMOND -- A new study says local cigarette taxes have adverse effects on low-income citizens and small business owners and rarely raise as much money as government officials project.

The Thomas Jefferson Institute for Public Policy released the study, which was funded by Philip Morris USA, as the Richmond City Council considers Mayor Levar Stoney’s proposal to impose a local cigarette tax of 50 cents per pack.

“Raising cigarette taxes is not a ‘cure-all’ for resolving budget problems,” said Michael W. Thompson, the institute’s chairman. He said the study found:

  • Over the years after raising cigarette taxes, jurisdictions rarely meet their revenue projections.

  • While it is common for the tax increase to produce more income for the locality in the first year, the income tends to decrease in following years.

  • When cigarette taxes increase, convenience stores and smaller grocery stores see their overall sales on non-tobacco items decrease.

Virginia imposes a cigarette excise tax of 1.5 cents on each cigarette, equating to 30 cents per pack and $3 per carton. Over 90 localities in the commonwealth impose a local cigarette tax.

Stoney said a tax of 50 cents per pack on cigarettes would yield $3 million a year in additional revenue for the city budget. His proposed levy is between the 22-cents-per-pack tax in Ashland and the $1.26-per-pack tax in Alexandria.

Councilman Parker Agelasto proposed an 80-cents-a-pack cigarette tax last year that did not pass, and which the mayor did not support.

“The counties surrounding Richmond have not changed their cigarette taxes so they will be the big winners if City Council adds 50 cents to a pack of cigarettes,” Thompson wrote in a column in the Richmond Times-Dispatch.

Henrico and Chesterfield County do not currently impose a local cigarette tax.

Thompson said the tax increase would hinder small businesses in multiple ways.

“Smokers will seek out the best prices for cigarettes, and those will be found a few blocks away in Henrico or Chesterfield counties,” Thompson said.

The Thomas Jefferson Institute’s report cites 2014 data from the National Association of Convenience Stores, drawn from over 3,400 shopping visits to such businesses.

Management Science Associates, a database management company, estimated tobacco was the fourth most often purchased item, with tobacco purchases made on 21% of the visits, according to the report.

The study showed that cigarette smokers visit convenience stores more frequently than nonsmokers and are more likely to buy products such as gasoline and beverages.

Thompson testified before the City Council last year when it was considering raising the cigarette tax.

“I gave them the documents and made my pitch, and they said, ‘Thank you very much -- we’ll read it later.’ They’re disparaging the small guy.”

The Thomas Jefferson Institute says its data also shows lower-income citizens suffer the most from the tax increase.

Using data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the institute noted that households earning less than $10,000 per year in the South spend 5.8 percent of their income on tobacco, while households in the same region earning more than $70,000 annually spend only .26 percent of their income on tobacco products. That’s $580 versus $182, respectively.

The Virginia Department of Health study, “Virginia Adult Tobacco Survey 2016-2017,” determined that in Virginia, “the greatest percentage of smokers earn the least amount of money.”

Some local business owners have mixed feelings about the cigarette tax increase.

R.E. Watkinson, owner of Lombardy Market in Richmond, said he is not against raising the tax.

“Of course it’s part of the business, but I don’t want my grandparents or other kids smoking,” Watkinson said.

Watkinson does not think the tax would affect the habits of people who already smoke. “People who are addicted are still going to smoke,” he said.

Watkinson said that when he opened his store, cigarettes accounted for about half of all sales. Now, he estimates they make up around 10%.

He said he believes the cigarette tax would slow down the rate of new smokers. Smoking as a whole has been decreasing nationally, but not in Virginia.

The commonwealth’s relationship with tobacco dates to colonial times. Altria and its Philip Morris USA subsidiary, which produces Marlboro and other cigarette brands, is based in Henrico County.

“Tobacco is such a huge part of Richmond’s history and economy,” said Stephen Hader, a senior fellow with the Thomas Jefferson Institute. “I think Richmond adopting a tobacco tax would have some symbolic impact as well.”

Despite its long history with tobacco, Virginia has been at the forefront of a national push to decrease teenage usage of vaping and tobacco products.

On July 1, Virginia will raise from 18 to 21 the legal age to purchase tobacco and nicotine products.

More than 10 other states have adopted or plan to enact similar laws, according to tobaccofreekids.org.

E-cigarettes such as Juul are currently not taxed by the city or state.

New Telephone Numbers for the Emporia Police Department

 

The Emporia Police Department has changed several of its telephone numbers. Please use the numbers below to replace any numbers you are currently using. Even though some older numbers may still be working now, they will eventually be removed.

• 911 Communications Center Non-Emergency number:

434-634-7320

• Emporia Police Administrative Offices:

434-634-2121

As always, please use 911 for all emergency calls.

Citizens Expand Efforts to Preserve Historically Black College’s History

By Arianna Coghill, Capital News Service

LAWRENCEVILLE, Va. — “Challenge by choice” was the motto of Saint Paul’s College, which closed in 2013 because of financial problems and declining student enrollment.

Now the citizens of Lawrenceville are living up to that motto — by taking up the challenge of collecting and preserving artifacts documenting the 125-year history of the historically black college.

Lawrenceville residents and other supporters of Saint Paul’s College have opened a museum to showcase the memorabilia — including an original copy of “Adventure in Faith,” an autobiography written by the Rev. James Solomon Russell, who was born enslaved, became an Episcopal priest and founded the school in 1888.

The year-old museum has been such a success that it is ready to expand to a new location.

“We’re trying to create a place that could be a home to the alumni and that they can identify with,” said Bobby Conner, vice chairman of the project.

Conversations about how to keep the college’s memory alive began in 2012 — the year before the school shut its doors.

“We saw the writing was on the wall,” said Sylvia Allen, a member of the conservation effort. Thus the James Solomon Russell-Saint Paul’s College Museum and Archives was born.

James Grimstead is the museum’s chairman and director. He and Conner discussed the idea with Saint Paul’s for a year before officials decided to discontinue the school.

Because there was much uncertainty about whether the college would remain open, Conner was hesitant to raise the subject — but he knew that it was important.

“What could’ve happened is that the university could’ve closed on June 30 (2013) and the creditors could’ve come on July 1,” Conner said. “If the creditors would’ve got involved, this museum would’ve never have happened.”

The school, which was on the National Register of Historic Places, was founded as Saint Paul Normal and Industrial School and then became Saint Paul’s Polytechnic Institute in 1941. The name was changed in 1957 to Saint Paul’s College to reflect its liberal arts curriculum.

    

The college’s demise followed pressure from the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, which revoked Saint Paul’s accreditation because of “lack of financial stability” and other reasons.

The nonprofit museum opened last April in downtown Lawrenceville, a town of about 1,400 people in Brunswick County, which borders North Carolina. It quickly filled with artifacts dating to the late 1800s. They range from a 1922 college guestbook to a 1973 student newspaper and include decades-old class photos, sports trophies and banners.

According to Grimstead and Conner, if they had not rescued these artifacts, the mementos likely would have remained in the campus’ abandoned buildings, which have weathered over time. Problems like mold would have seriously damaged many of the items.

    

    

Several alumni such as former professional basketball player Antwain Smith have visited the museum — not only to travel down memory lane but also to reflect on the classes before them.

Teya Whitehead, who graduated from Saint Paul’s College in 1998, was devastated when she first heard that the school was closing. She still finds it to be a difficult pill to swallow.

But with the establishment of the museum, the happy memories of her college days will stay preserved.

“My favorite memory was the overall camaraderie that we had together. Many of my lifelong friends are still in contact with me today,” Whitehead said. “The school was a very family-oriented environment.”

With the sheer amount of memorabilia, the museum’s current location has become cramped. There are plans to move the museum to the former Saint Paul’s College Student Center, which now serves as the Brunswick County Conference Center. The grand reopening is scheduled for Aug. 10.

“I never imagined while moving that stuff that we’d be where we are today,” Conner said. “I was just getting it off campus to protect it.”

Attorney General Mark Herring supports bill to make D.C. the 51st state

By Kal Weinstein, Capital News Service

RICHMOND -- Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring is urging support for federal legislation to make Washington, D.C., the 51st state.

Herring joined 19 other state attorneys general -- all Democrats -- in issuing a “first-of-a-kind” statement in favor of the idea.

The statement was issued Monday just ahead of D.C.’s April 16 Emancipation Day celebration. It cited the holiday as a reminder of limits on the District’s freedom and autonomy.

“The District’s over 700,000 residents work hard, raise families and pay the highest federal taxes per capita, and yet they are deprived of the fundamental right to participate meaningfully in our representative democracy,” the statement read.

U.S. Rep. Eleanor Holmes Norton, the nonvoting delegate representing D.C. in Congress, introduced H.R 51 in January. More than 200 House members are  co-sponsoring the proposal.

Holmes has previously introduced legislation to make D.C. a state; however, this marks the first time that state attorneys general across the country have united to support the idea.

“The District’s residents deserve equal voting rights and autonomy under the law. We support Statehood for the District of Columbia and urge passage of H.R. 51 to accomplish this goal,” the statement read.

In the statement, Herring announced he is pleased to stand beside Karl Racine, the attorney general for D.C., and 18 other state attorneys general to support the initiative.

“Washington, D.C., already acts as an important state in so many ways, and it is well past time that their contributions to our country are reflected in statehood,” Herring said. “District residents are hardworking, taxpaying Americans who deserve to have their voices heard and their votes counted.”

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi has also expressed support for Holmes’ proposal.

“Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton has been a tireless voice on this important issue, and her introduction of H.R. 51 is a critical step in righting this historic wrong,” Pelosi said.

U.S. Rep. Elijah Cummings, head of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform, has pledged to hold a hearing on the bill later this year. If it passes, D.C.’s addition as a state would add two senators and one representative with full voting rights to Congress.

Those who oppose the nation’s capital earning its statehood argue that it would inherently create a conflict of interest for legislators who serve in D.C. to represent constituents back home in their respective states. In the Federalist Papers, James Madison stated that if D.C. were to become a state, its voting members would wield higher power than other states through its proximity to Congress.

In 1971, passage of the 23rd Amendment gave members of the District votes in the electoral college. If renewed support fails to pass H.R. 51 when it comes up for a hearing later this year, the federal government will continue to maintain jurisdiction over the capital city, just as it has since its founding in 1790.

Care Bags for Chemo

 

 

 

 

 

Teresa Collins, Director of Oncology; Julie Smith; Penny Evans, Independent Director of Thirty-One Gifts; Sep Evans, Carleen Wells, Mary Edmonds; and Ronnie Wells.

An incredible outpouring of community support shattered a fundraiser’s goal this year.

In the Chemo/Radiation Care Bag Fundraiser’s third year, care bags were purchased, filled with items, and delivered to the Hendrick Cancer and Rehab Center for their patients.

Penny Evans, Independent Director of Thirty-One Gifts, hoped to get 131 bags this year, but ended up with 305.

Evans said she started the fundraiser in honor of her friend Shelley Mayer, who was diagnosed with cancer. Today, Mayer is cancer free.

Members of the community purchased bags for $29, and Evans used the commission of these sales to purchase additional items to go inside.

Teresa Collins, RN, BSN, OCN and Director of Oncology, provided guidance on the needed items for patients, and each of the 305 bags was filled with a pocket planner, chap stick, tissues, socks, hand sanitizer, and candy.

Also placed in each bag was a pen and paper set donated by Touchstone Bank and Mary Kay hand creams, donated by Tanya Baskerville, Mary Kay Independent Beauty Consultant.

A number of community members assisted with filling each bag and delivering them to the center.

Evans was especially appreciative of her husband’s, Sep Evans, help and support, in addition to the community who made this fundraiser the most successful year yet.

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Horse Racing Returns as Gaming Parlors Open in Virginia

By Emma Gauthier, Capital News Service

RICHMOND, Va. -- Horses soon will race again at Colonial Downs, and Virginians will be able to bet on them and play slots-style machines in a casino-like setting at four other locations across the commonwealth.

The Colonial Downs Group will resume horse racing at its track in New Kent County and offer off-track betting at the other sites under the brand Rosie’s Gaming Emporium.

The New Kent County racetrack, between Richmond and Williamsburg, closed in 2014. Colonial Downs plans to resume horse racing there in August.

But before then, Virginians will have a chance to gamble -- on historical horse racing gaming machines at the Rosie’s Gaming Emporium locations. The slots-style machines allow players to bet on horses from past races and also bet against other opponents.

The Colonial Downs Group is set to open a Rosie’s at the New Kent County track on April 23. The company will also open gaming parlors in Richmond, Hampton, Chesapeake and the Roanoke County town of Vinton by the end of 2019.

Rosie’s will generate $25 million in state taxes annually and create 800 jobs statewide, according to Colonial Downs spokesman Mark Hubbard. The Richmond location will employ about 150 people and open in June.

Mayor Levar Stoney has endorsed the venture, which will be in South-Central Richmond.

“We’ve had tremendous support from Mayor Stoney and city leaders,” Hubbard said. “The community in the 9th District is excited about us opening soon, and we’re very excited about bringing a new form of entertainment and fun to Richmond.”

The five Rosie’s facilities will include a total of 3,000 historical horse racing gaming machines. The bets feed into a collective pool that players can win, with various purses.

“The revenues that we generate through the machines will help fund purses at the race track and a portion of the revenues will go to the horse racing industry,” Hubbard said.

The collective purse falls under a type of gambling known as pari-mutuel betting. This type of gaming machine was created in Kentucky to revitalize the horse industry and generate revenue year-round, Hubbard said.

Using the machines, players select three horses (the winners of historical horse races), place a bet and then watch an animated re-enactment of the horses competing. The company calls the machines a “competitive substitute for traditional casino style games.”

The launch of Rosie’s Gaming Emporium coincides with a push in the General Assembly to allow casinos in the commonwealth.

On March 21, Gov. Ralph Northam signed into law a bill that may eventually loosen the reins on casino gambling. SB 1126, sponsored by Sen. L. Louise Lucas, D-Portsmouth, calls for a study of casino gaming in the state, which must be completed by Dec. 1.

Going forward, localities would be required to pass a referendum to allow casino gaming. The Virginia Lottery Board would regulate the casinos. The board cannot issue any gaming licenses before July 1, 2020.

The new law also gives the Virginia Racing Commission control of racing with pari-mutuel wagering.

The Colonial Downs Group will participate in the study, Hubbard said.

Many Virginians are excited by the idea of casino gambling, but some organizations are worried about a negative impact on communities.

The Virginia Council on Problem Gambling believes that more people will develop gambling-related problems when given more opportunities to gamble.

“As our legislators seek to expand gambling in Virginia, they need to do so responsibly by first assessing the risks and rewards, which hopefully the gambling study the governor is calling for will in part provide, and also setting up safeguards to protect the public from harm,” said the council’s president, Carolyn Hawley.

The Family Foundation, a nonprofit Christian organization, has similiar reservations and also believes that crime increases near casinos. The Colonial Downs Group believes its gaming centers will improve quality of life and possibly decrease crime.

The Rosie’s in Richmond will replace a vacant Kmart lot off Midlothian Turnpike near Chippenham Parkway. Police regularly patrol the area because of crime, Hubbard said.

“We’re going to add a lot of lighting, surveillance and people coming and going, which will deter criminals,” Hubbard said. “When you bring a fun, lively, very well-lit and secure entertainment facility, that disperses crime.”

Dr. Thomas Guirkin Is VCU Health CMH’s New VP Of Medical Affairs

Good ole’ southern charm is easily recognized, but not easily duplicated. The new Vice President of Medical Affairs at VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital recognized that charm at CMH and knew he had found a home.

“I was impressed by the sense of community I found here,” Tom Guirkin, Jr. MD, said about him landing in Southside Virginia.

A Richmond native, Dr. Guirkin has spent the past 12 years preparing for his role at VP of MA at VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital.

"I had been moving from position to position, slowly building my fund of knowledge in order to promote public health. That being said, I really am a small town person,” “I found CMH to be a very good fit for me in that respect.” Over the past 12 years, I have worked in some organizations that were not necessarily the most collaborative of workplaces. I am of the opinion that you can be cordial and collaborative at work and accomplish your goals. I see that type of atmosphere at CMH.”

Scott Burnette, CEO of CMH said, “We conducted a national search and had several very qualified candidates.  We were fortunate to be able to recruit Dr. Guirkin to our team.  His training and experience will be a great asset as we continue our efforts to grow services and expand our abilities to treat more patients close to home.”

Dr. Guirkin explained his job at CMH as being not just an administrator or physician but also a resource for the community as a whole.

“I want to be working with doctors, nurses, finance, the lab – pretty much everyone to make things happen, to better meet the needs of our patients and their families, but also help meet the needs of the employees here at CMH,” he said.

Dr. Guirkin has an impressive resume and deep Virginia ties. He is a 1999 Summa Cum Laude graduate of VCU with a major in biology and a focus in chemistry. He then attended the Medical College of Virginia, graduating in 2003. From 2003 through 2006, Dr. Guirkin was at Georgetown University Hospital in Washington D.C. where he completed his internship and residency.

“I loved D.C.,” he said of his time at Georgetown and his first job after residency at Mount Vernon Internal Medicine in Alexandria, VA.

After Mount Vernon Internal Medicine, Dr. Guirkin headed back to Richmond where he provided inpatient medical services at Saint Mary’s, a Bon Secour Hospital on a full time basis. While doing his primary practice in the hospital, he continued to maintain his outpatient skills by practicing urgent care and primary care services at Patient First. While at Saint Mary’s, he had his first foray into the business, quality and management sides of medicine when he worked at Intercede Health as an order optimizer consultant.

“I had played with the thought during medical school about getting a Master’s Degree in Business Administration,” he said. “I got my first exposure to process improvement and strategic leadership at St. Mary’s Hospital in Richmond and decided to go ahead and pursue my MBA.”

While he was attending business school, Dr. Guirkin worked for James River Hospitalist Group in Richmond.

“That was the start of working seven days a week for two straight years,” he said. “Except for a couple of holidays off, I was working all day, every day between my job and business school.” Dr. Guirkin was providing hospitalist support for Chippenham and Johnston-Willis while attending graduate school at VCU.

Following his graduation from business school, Dr. Guirkin began to look for a position that allowed him to utilize all of his expertise. He was offered two different administrative positions but declined these due to their not allowing him to continue practicing medicine. It was at this time he was introduced to the Saint Francis Health System in Tulsa, Oklahoma. This finally afforded him the opportunity to grow as a manager yet continue to practice medicine.

“Saint Francis is a large health system with six hospitals in the Tulsa metro region and I was overseeing a large 60 FTE (Full Time Equivalent) hospitalist group and during my time there it grew to 85 FTEs. It was there I honed my management skills.  I was mentored by a fantastic doctor – Mark Frost, Senior Vice President on many aspects of quality management.”

The original plan was for Dr. Guirkin to eventually move into a more senior role, but providence had other ideas, he said. “I got a chance email from VCU and decided to take a look,” he said. “And it was exactly what I was looking for. I really appreciate the people here and it’s just a great fit for us. I was impressed that CMH maintained its identity during the affiliation with VCU Health. All the names on all the rooms showed me that this was the type of place I wanted to be.”

CMH ran a capital campaign where community members could donate and have naming rights to various rooms in the new hospital and C.A.R.E. Building.

“I will be seeing patients on a limited basis here at CMH,” he said. “Not exactly sure at this point what that looks like, but it was important to me to maintain that aspect of care.”

He also wants to find unique ways to bring medical care to the communities CMH services.

“I’m big on preventive medicine and wanting to make sure everyone has access to care,” he said.

Dr. Guirkin wanted to be closer to his parents who still reside in Richmond.

Dr. Guirkin and spouse Brian Sharp have two four-legged children a pug name Samantha and a Belgium Mallonois named Tucker. In his spare time, he enjoys running, reading and working in the yard.

Springtime in Paris From SVCC Chorus

The acclaimed Southside Virginia Community College (SVCC) Chorus, is bringing “Springtime in Paris” with Harpist, Winifred Garrett to Southside Virginia on Sunday, April 28th at 3:00 PM at the South Hill Presbyterian Church at 914 N. Mecklenburg Ave, South Hill, VA 23970. Admission is free.

The Chorus of the Southside Virginia Community College is fully supported by SVCC, your local community college, and its Foundation. SVCC realizes the value of bringing quality choral music to you in Southside Virginia. Because of the valuable support of the SVCC Foundation, harpist Winifred Garrett from Durham, NC will be performing this Spring with flutes, Dee Pinnell and Laurel Sciortino, both from Boydton. This exceptional concert will be offered at South Hill Presbyterian Church’s accessible space at no cost to you.

Winifred Garrett last played with the SVCC Chorus in December 2015. She is a noted harpist from Durham where she teaches and performs within a full concert and recital schedule. With a career of over thirty years, Winifred has had the privilege of being the first African American harpist to grace the stage in countless performance venues and settings. The Founder/Artistic Director of “The Harp Studio” based in Durham, North Carolina, highlights from her performance career includes appearances with Stevie Wonder at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York City, performing with Marvin Gaye at Radio City Music Hall, playing the wedding of singer/actress Whitney Houston, and performing with the Boys Choir of Harlem and for the Dance Theater of Harlem. She continues to maintain a heavy performance schedule and is the Principal Harpist for the Fayetteville Symphony. She presently plays for the Umstead Hotel and Spa, one of the prestigious four star/five diamond hotels of North Carolina.

“Springtime in Paris” features a Romantic selection of music for Harp, Chorus, Piano and Flutes with a French accent, composed by Gabriel Fauré, Aaron Copland, and even a Claude Debussy harp solo. Fresh arrangements of, “Angel Band”, tunes by George Gershwin and Irving Berlin, “Goin’ Home” by Antonin Dvořák, popular love songs,  and music from “Les Miserablés”, are just a sampling of the repertoire to be presented on April 28.

The SVCC Chorus has been under the direction of Carol Henderson of Buffalo Junction since 2014. And through the support of pianist Sally Tharrington of Boydton, and the inclusion of its great singers, the chorus is growing in vocal beauty. Rehearsals are conveniently located at the crossroads of Highway 58, Route 1, and Interstate 85 at the South Hill Presbyterian Church. The chorus, now 42 members, continues to attract new singers from the surrounding Southside areas. Rehearsals for Fall 2019 will begin on the Sunday following Labor Day, September 8th at 6:00 PM at South Hill Presbyterian Church.

Thorough continued support by SVCC and its Foundation, we are looking forward to plans for 2019-20 season which include brass and carols for Holiday Concerts 2019,  and  a special presentation of  Handel’s MessiahPart 2 with chamber orchestra for Spring 2020. For more information on the SVCC Chorus: NEW! visit:www. southside.edu/svcc-chorus

The SVCC Chorus promises to bring you a concert of excellence and beauty,…and what better inspiration than with music of the classical harp and music from France! Presented on Sunday, April 28, 2019 at 3:00 PM at South Hill Presbyterian Church, fully accessible, the concert includes a reception. Church lot parking is available, and also, across the street at Benchmark Bank and the neighboring parking lot. You are invited to bring your families, friends and neighbors for “Springtime in Paris”!

VIRGINIA STATE POLICE CAPTAIN EARNS LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD FOR 25-YEARS OF DEDICATED & INNOVATIVE PUBLIC SAFETY EFFORTS

RICHMOND – Virginia State Police Capt. Tricia W. Powers is the 2019 recipient of the esteemed Mid-Atlantic Association of Women in Law Enforcement’s (MAAWLE) “Lifetime Achievement Award.” Powers (center) was recognized this week at the 33rd Annual MAAWLE Conference in Poconos, Penn. 

“Throughout her 25-year law enforcement career, Captain Powers has consistently distinguished herself through outstanding accomplishments, leadership and contributions not only to the Virginia State Police, but to the nation,” said Col. Gary T. Settle, Virginia State Police Superintendent. “With a proven record of success, through partnership, engagement and communication, Captain Powers has embraced new challenges and continues to exceed expectations and provide deliverables that have enhanced the overall capabilities of the Virginia State Police. We are excited for her to be selected for this prestigious and most deserving recognition.”

Powers began her career with the Virginia State Police (VSP) on Nov. 1, 1993. During the course of her career, she has worked as a special agent in the Department’s Drug Enforcement Section and Fugitive Apprehension Unit. During these assignments, she also achieved the DEA Site Safety Officer Certification for meth lab processing/investigations and acted as the lead investigator on several methamphetamine lab investigations in the Tidewater area. As first sergeant, she supervised and directed investigations for the Insurance Fraud and Auto Theft programs within the Bureau of Criminal Investigation’s (BCI) Chesapeake Field Office.  Later she served as the Area 32 Commander in the Norfolk/Virginia Beach area and supervised the third busiest VSP Area Office in the state within the Bureau of Field Operations (BFO).

Upon her appointment to lieutenant, she transferred to the VSP Bureau of Field Operations (BFO) Richmond Field Division. In September 2016, she was promoted to her current rank of captain and became the commander of the Criminal Justice Information Services Division (CJIS). The CJIS Division is in charge of the Central Criminal Records Exchange (CCRE), Virginia Criminal Information Network (VCIN), Live Scan, IBR/UCR annual crime report, Sex Offender Registry, Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) and the Firearms Transaction Center (FTC).  Powers oversees approximately 250 sworn and civilian personnel assigned to the CJIS Division.

She is a 2012 graduate of the FBI National Academy and she is currently First Vice President on the Board of Directors, FBI National Academy Associates Virginia Chapter.  She also represents Virginia as the FBI CJIS Systems Officer (CSO) and is responsible for the administration of the CJIS network with CJIS System Agencies (CSA). 

The MAAWLE Lifetime Achievement Award is presented to a law enforcement professional with at least 15 years of experience, who has distinguished herself through outstanding accomplishments and contributions spanning her career in law enforcement. MAAWLE is a professional organization of law enforcement officers and individuals promoting women in law enforcement working or residing within the states of Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Washington, DC.

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