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Black History Month

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Brunswick County Public Schools Two Hour Delay Thursday

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This list updated from WRIC, WWBT and WTVR Wednesday at 21:45

Jackson-Feild Residents Celebrate Black History

In recognition and celebration of Black History Month, Residential Services Supervisor Katrinka Phillips planned an entire day filled with a number of fun and educational activities. Residents created posters depicting African-Americans who were instrumental in the Civil Rights Movement. They held a poetry reading and read aloud black history information that resonated with them.  They even enjoyed a rousing game of “Black History Jeopardy” featuring questions written by staff about important people, places, days, and definitions.

Working to ensure that every holiday throughout the year is recognized with a special meal, Jackson-Feild’s Director of Food Services Cynthia Easter pulled out all the stops for this Black History Month celebration.  Easter and her staff prepared a dinner of fried chicken, homemade macaroni and cheese, strings beans, rolls and apple cobbler that was thoroughly enjoyed by residents and staff alike.

Days like this are just one of the many things that set Jackson-Feild apart from other treatment facilities. In addition to receiving the treatment they need, the boys and girls are provided opportunities to explore topics of interest as a group, share their talents, and celebrate holidays that are important to them.

2018 Black History Month Proclimation

Mr. George E. Morrison III, Secretary of the Greensville Emporia NAACP and Emporia's first Appointed Black City Manager, and Deacon Cornell Hines of the Executive Board accept the 2018 Black History Month Proclimation from Emporia's first Black Mayor, Mary L. Person

Proclamation

Black History Month

February 1-28, 2018

Whereas,February is recognized nationally as Black History Month and Dr. Carter B. Woodson, a distinguished African American author, editor, publisher and historian, is acclaimed “Father of Black History Month”.  Dr. Woodson believed that African Americans should know their past in order to participate in the affairs of the country; and

Whereas,Black History Month acknowledges both past and present African and African-American icons whose courage, sacrifices, and relentless efforts have sought to improve the quality of life for all in the name of justice, honor and freedom; and

Whereas,such noted African-American icons as Ida B. Wells, the renowned writer, teacher, women’s suffragist and anti-lynching crusader; and Rosa Parks, whose famous decision to remain in her seat symbolized the spirit of the Civil Rights Movement, have made imperative contributions to our society; and notable local African Americans as Joseph C. Bond, a mortician, was the first African American to serve on Emporia City Council and a founder of the local NAACP branch; Dr. Willie Joyner, a physician and entrepreneur, owned a medical building, a movie theatre, and rental properties; Dr. Joseph Macklin, a pharmacist, was the first African American druggist to manage his own business; Charles Harris, a mechanic, was the first African American to own and operate a service station; Edward Westwood Wyatt, an advocate for improved school conditions for African Americans and a zealous educator, legacy lives on as the first African American High School (E.W. Wyatt High School) was named in his honor; Charlie Stephen Thomas, a businessman and a founder of the local NAACP branch, operated a grocery store across from Greensville County Training School to provide snacks for the students, since there were no cafeterias at that time; Etta Reavis, a homemaker, provided hot meals and shelter for local teachers at R.R. Moton Elementary School; Elizabeth R. Allison, Reverend and Mrs. Willie Curley, Sr., Annie Green, and Helen Kindred provided shelter and meals for the teachers on the North side of town; George C. Williams, a local farmer, purchased a bus to transport students and teachers to school that resided in the county; and

Whereas,the Honorable Mary L. Person was elected as the first African American female to serve on Emporia City Council, made history again when she was elected on  November 6, 2012, as the first African American and first female to serve as Mayor for the City of Emporia; and

Whereas,it is essential to learn from the many lessons of history from world renowned leaders as well as the contributions of local African Americans to continue the pursuit of our Founding Fathers’ vision of liberty, justice and equality for all; and

Now, Therefore, I, Mary L. Person, by virtue of the authority vested in me as Mayor of the City of Emporia, Virginia do hereby proclaim February 1-28, 2018 as Black History Month in the City of Emporia.

Done this 6th day of February in the year 2018.

African-inspired art exhibit opens in Richmond

 

black_history_museum1

By Amelia Heymann, Capital News Service

RICHMOND – To kick off Black History Month, the Black History Museum and Cultural Center of Virginia is exhibiting four decades of work by Murry DePillars, an artist known for his vivid colors and geometric shapes as well as his political commentary and African-inspired patterns.

“Murry DePillars: Double Vision,” which features 37 pieces of artwork, opens Friday and runs through June 3 at the museum, 122 W. Leigh St. in Richmond. While DePillars did everything from crayon illustration to quilting, most of the exhibit shows off his acrylic paintings.

DePillars’ career spanned four decades, from the 1960s to the early 2000s. His early work, such as the illustration “Aunt Jemima,” deals with socio-economic and political commentary. Unlike his later work, those illustrations used little color. The drawings were created while DePillars was studying art in Chicago and later Pennsylvania.

DePillars was dean of the School of the Arts at Virginia Commonwealth University from 1976 to 1999. Tasha Chambers, director of the Black History Museum and Cultural Center of Virginia, said DePillars was integral in turning VCU into one of the largest art schools in the country. He lived in Richmond until his death in 2008.

Even as a dean at VCU, DePillars continued his own artistic pursuit and travels. On his trips, he carried a suitcase full of art supplies so he could easily work on his art wherever he went. The suitcase he used and two unfinished paintings are featured in the exhibit.

DePillars’ late work contrasts with his early illustrations. Stepping into the upstairs gallery, visitors are greeted by an array of vivid colors and patterns that mimic traditional African beadwork. Within the mixture of geometric shapes are hidden figures and objects.

Chambers said DePillars did extensive research in creating his art and often looked at how Africa as well as the current environment influenced African-American traditions.

The exhibit takes its name from Michael D. Harris, an artist and art historian who applied the term “double vision” in describing the process by which black artists look back to Africa and compare its culture to that of contemporary society. Chambers said the museum also chose this name for the exhibit because it explores not only DePillars’ artistic career but also his role as an educator.

The exhibition coincides with a host of Black History Month events. Chambers said the museum is celebrating black Americans’ contributions to “life, love and liberty” – and also fighting for those values.

“We are celebrating,” Chambers said. But given the current political environment, “we are also still participating in the movement to bring awareness to these things that may now be in jeopardy.”

To find out more about the museum’s events for Black History Month, visit blackhistorymuseum.org.

February is Black History Month in the City of Emporia

Proclamation

Black History Month

Whereas, February is recognized nationally as Black History Month and Dr. Carter B. Woodson, a distinguished African American author, editor, publisher and historian, is acclaimed “Father of Black History Month”.  Dr. Woodson believed that African Americans should know their past in order to participate in the affairs of the country; and

Whereas, Black History Month acknowledges both past and present African and African-American icons whose courage, sacrifices, and relentless efforts have sought to improve the quality of life for all in the name of justice, honor and freedom; and

Whereas, such noted African-American icons as Ida B. Wells, the renowned writer, teacher, women’s suffragist and anti-lynching crusader; and Rosa Parks, whose famous decision to remain in her seat symbolized the spirit of the Civil Rights Movement, have made imperative contributions to our society; and notable local African Americans as Joseph C. Bond, a mortician, was the first African American to serve on Emporia City Council and a founder of the local NAACP branch; Dr. Willie Joyner, a physician and entrepreneur, owned a medical building, a movie theatre, and rental properties; Dr. Joseph Macklin, a pharmacist, was the first African American druggist to manage his own business; Charles Harris, a mechanic, was the first African American to own and operate a service station; Edward Westwood Wyatt, an advocate for improved school conditions for African Americans and a zealous educator, legacy lives on as the first African American High School (E.W. Wyatt High School) was named in his honor; Charlie Stephen Thomas, a businessman and a founder of the local NAACP branch, operated a grocery store across from Greensville County Training School to provide snacks for the students, since there were no cafeterias at that time; Etta Reavis, a homemaker, provided hot meals and shelter for local teachers at R.R. Moton Elementary School; Elizabeth R. Allison, Reverend and Mrs. Willie Curley, Sr., Annie Green, and Helen Kindred provided shelter and meals for the teachers on the North side of town; George C. Williams, a local farmer, purchased a bus to transport students and teachers to school that resided in the county; and

Whereas, the Honorable Mary L. Person was elected as the first African American female to serve on Emporia City Council, made history again when she was elected on  November 6, 2012, as the first African American and first female to serve as Mayor for the City of Emporia; and

Whereas, it is essential to learn from the many lessons of history from world renowned leaders as well as the contributions of local African Americans to continue the pursuit of our Founding Fathers’ vision of liberty, justice and equality for all; and

Now, Therefore, I, Mary L. Person, by virtue of the authority vested in me as Mayor of the City of Emporia, Virginia do hereby proclaim February 2014 as Black History Month in the City of Emporia.

Done this 4h day of February in the year 2014.

SVCC Sponsoring the Tenth Annual African American History Quiz

The tenth annual African-American History Contest sponsored by Southside Virginia Community College will challenge what you know and offer a chance to win monetary prizes, too.  Students and the general public are eligible to participate for prizes of $125, $75 and $50.  Sponsors include the SVCC President Dr. John J. Cavan, Student Development and Student Activities.

Contest questions will require some knowledge and/or investigation on the part of the participants. 

Contest materials can be picked up from these SVCC locations now: Southside Virginia Higher Education Center in Emporia from Gary Cifers; the SVCC Christanna Campus in Alberta from Vondrenna Smithers or Susan Early or Louise Ogburn; SVCC John H. Daniel Campus in Keysville from Letina Giles; the Estes Community Center in Chase City from Melissa Robbins; Southern Virginia Higher Education Center in South Boston from Kathy Whitt; Occupational Technical Center in Blackstone from LaTonya Fowlkes; and Lake Country Advanced Knowledge Center in South Hill from Makiko Malone.

The deadline for submitting completed entries is 5 pm on Thursday, February 20, 2014.  Celebrate African American History Month by participating in this exciting challenge.  For further information, contact Vondrenna Smithers  at 434-949-1028 or Le’Tina Giles at 434-736-2023.

February 2014 Declared Black History Month in Greesville County

RESOLUTION #14-99

RECOGNITION OF BLACK HISTORY MONTH

FEBRUARY 2014

WHEREAS, the month of February has been set aside as a time to recognize accomplishments of African-Americans; and

WHEREAS, two natives of Southside Virginia, the late Dr. Charles Drew and Dr. Carter G. Woodson, and many others were instrumental in initiating  scholarly studies of Black History and other historical endeavors; and

WHEREAS, the late Garland P. Faison, was the first African-American to hold elected office in Greensville County; first as Justice of the Peace and then as a member of the Board of Supervisors for 20 years where he was dedicated to improving conditions for all county citizens; and

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Greensville County Board of Supervisors does hereby recognize February 2014 as Black History Month in Greensville County.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Board of Supervisor encourages all Greensville County residents to actively pursue information that will enlighten them on the many valuable accomplishments to Greensville County by African-Americans.

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