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Caitlin Barbieri

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Cold Temperatures Fail to Deter Inauguration Crowd

By Logan Bogert and Caitlin Barbieri, Capital News Service

RICHMOND –  Virginians had a lot of reasons to endure biting cold temperatures Saturday to witness Ralph Northam's inauguration as governor. Some of the estimated 5,000 spectators came with a plea of help. Some wanted to witness democracy in action. And others had dedicated themselves to the Northam campaign.

“I’m here to celebrate our way ahead,” Christine Payne of Williamsburg said, referring to Northam’s inaugural theme. “I worked hard for him since his primary, and I am here to continue that support. I hope to see his campaign promises come to fruition, from the environment all to the economy.”

Sophin Sok, a Richmond resident from Cambodia, said she came to the inaugural ceremony in hopes of getting Northam’s attention to pardon her fiance, who has been detained for three months and faces deportation.  

“He  came here at the age of 3, and he’s the biological father to three of my kids.” Sok said. “About a decade ago, he plead guilty to a charge, but he served his time, paid his debt to society and he turned his life around and pretty much put his family as a priority.

“They didn’t prepare him for anything, they just took him. They didn’t allow us to prepare ourselves -- so now it’s kind of hard for me because he is the main provider also and he’s a great father,” Sok said.

Sok said she and her fiance have children ages 1, 2 and 6. They  want Northam to write a pardon letter so he can come home and get a second chance to stay in America.

For Kevin Miller of Danville, the inaugural parade brought a special family meaning. He came to watch his son perform with the George Washington High School marching band. “It’s a great honor for them and an opportunity for them to do something they don’t get to do very often,” Miller said.

The ceremony and parade showcased Virginia's diversity.

The day opened with the Pledge of Allegiance, led by Boy and Girl Scouts from the All Dulles Area Muslim Society Center. And it closed with the blessing of the grounds by representatives of Virginia's Indian tribes.

Universities from across the state took part in the parade, as did such groups as Equality Virginia, the Cultural Center of India and the Charlottesville Cardinals Wheelchair Basketball Team.

New Immigrant Rights Legislation Aims to Protect Undocumented Virginians

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Margie Del Castillo, associate director of community mobilization at the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health. (CNS photo by Adam Hamza)

 

By Caitlin Barbieri and Adam Hamza, Capital News Service

RICHMOND – The Virginia Coalition for Immigrant Rights called on the General Assembly Tuesday to pass legislation to provide driver's licenses and in-state college tuition to certain undocumented immigrants

Coalition members and student supporters spoke at a news conference advocating for legislation that would improve the lives of undocumented immigrants. Del. Jennifer Boysko, D-Herndon, attended to show her support.

“While Virginia cannot create a path to citizenship for undocumented students, Virginia does have the power to create opportunities for them,” Boysco said. 

Boysco plans to propose legislation that will give undocumented immigrants access to a state driver’s license. Virginia resident Gustavo Angels spoke at the meeting to express his support for such a bill.

“Drivers will be more likely to stay at the scene of an accident, aid police or other emergency workers and exchange insurance information with other drivers,” he said. “It would allow many community members to feel more comfortable reporting a crime or involving the police when they need help.”

Jung Bin Cho is a recent Virginia Tech graduate and registered as an undocumented immigrant through the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals in 2012. Because of DACA, he was able to work and go to school as an undocumented immigrant. Cho said his own access to a driver's license allowed him greater access to jobs. 

“It’s important [to have a driver's license] in Virginia because, I think, you need that to be successful,” Cho said.

Boysco has proposed HB 343, which expands eligibility for in-state tuition to students who have applied for legal residence or intend to apply.

“All Virginians benefit when each of our young people fulfill their greatest potential,” Boysko said.

“There are thousands of unfilled jobs in Virginia that require an associate’s or bachelor’s degree. We need an educated workforce to continue to build a new Virginia economy. These students are our neighbors, our friends, our coworkers, and family. I believe in building a more just and inclusive Commonwealth.”

When asked about the obstacles to the bill, Boysko said, “Some members of the House of Delegates believe that undocumented immigrants should not benefit from in-state tuition.  Clearly there are those at the federal level of government who hold those views.

“I hope that in Virginia we can do better.  The economic benefits of an educated workforce and the moral imperative of treating all of our young people fairly is the right choice for Virginia.”

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