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Career Opportunity

Residential Counselors

(Youth Service Workers)

 

Job#: 2017-10

If you are interested in making a positive impact on the lives of Virginia’s youth, then we want you to become part of our Team!  Rural Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facility located in Jarratt, Virginia seeks positive role models to work directly with adolescent boys and girls in a psychiatric residential treatment program.  The Youth Service Worker is responsible for role-modeling healthy behavior, teaching life skills, administering a trauma informed behavioral support program, and leading youth in and participating in social, cultural, and recreational activities.  This position supervises youth in the residential unit and on off-campus activities and appointments.

Must possess the availability to work weekends, evenings, holidays, and nights.  Supreme flexibility required. 

Seeking candidates with Bachelor’s Degrees in Psychology, Sociology or other Human Services field.   Experience will be considered in lieu of a degree.

Compensation package includes 401(k) retirement plan & employer sponsored health, dental, vision & life insurance.  JBHS is a Drug Free Workplace.  Successful applicants must pass a pre-employment drug screen and criminal background screening.  EOE.  Positions opened until filled.

E-mail cover letter and resume to:

Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services
Attn: Chris Thompson
Job # 2017-10
E-mail:careers@jacksonfeild.org

VSU's Randolph Farm Hosts Popular Ginger and Turmeric Field Day

Virginia State University (VSU) is bringing back its ever-popular Ginger and Turmeric Field Day on Nov. 16, from 8 a.m. to noon at the university’s Randolph Farm, 4415 River Road, Petersburg, VA.

This Cooperative Extension event will include indoor classroom presentations and a visit to the fields where participants will learn about harvest, washing and market preparation for the two crops.

“Both ginger and turmeric are considered healthy spices. Nationwide, the consumption of ginger and turmeric has increased significantly,” said Dr. Reza Rafie, VSU Extension horticulture specialist. “Participants will learn about the proper conditions for growing and marketing ginger and turmeric.”

The event will feature several guest speakers, including Dr. Shoba Ghosh, associate chair for research in the Department of Internal Medicine at Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, who conducts clinical research using turmeric; and Dr. Theresa Nartea, VSU Extension specialist in marketing & agribusiness, and Wanda Johnson, VSU Extension associate culinary demonstration specialist.

Local ginger growers Bill Cox from Casselmonte Farm, Michael Clark from Planet Earth Diversified, and Richard Harrison from the Farm at the Red Hill will share their experiences with participants and answer questions. Several buyers will also attend the field day and visit with potential new growers.

Ginger and turmeric are flavorful spices commonly used in cooking. Ginger is a flowering, herbaceous, perennial plant; turmeric is a plant in the ginger family. Each has medicinal properties that can be traced back thousands of years. Small farmers can produce these niche crops for health-conscious consumers.

Registration is $10 per person. To register visit www.ext.vsu.edu/calendar, click on the event and then click on the registration link. 

If you need further information, or are a person with a disability and desire any assistive devices, services or other accommodations to participate in this activity, please contact Agriculture & Natural Resources Program office at (804) 524-5960 / (800) 828-1120 (TDD) during business hours of 8 am. and 5 p.m. to discuss accommodations no later than five days prior to the event.

Extension is a joint program of Virginia Tech, Virginia State University, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and state and local governments. Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. An equal opportunity/ affirmative action employer. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. Edwin J. Jones, Director, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; M. Ray McKinnie, Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State University, Petersburg.

Pass Your Forest Forward; Keeping A Forest in the Family for Future Generations

by Neil Clark, Forestry Extension Agent

More than 10 million acres of Virginia’s woodlands belong to nearly 374,000 family forest owners, 51 percent of whom are 65 years of age or older.  Some have owned their land for generations; others, only a few years. As they look ahead, many landowners want to keep their forestland intact and  in the family, but they don’t know where to begin or how to engage the next generation of owners. The upcoming “Family Forest Landowner" workshop introduces concerned landowners to the options available to transfer their land and legacy to the next generation. 

“Focusing on Forestland Transfer to Generation ‘NEXT’” is being offered November 2 and 9 at the New Kent Forestry Center near Providence Forge, Virginia. This two-day program will help family forest landowners successfully plan the transfer of their woodlands, intact, from one generation to the next. Current and future owners of family woodlands will learn family communication basics, estate planning tools and succession planning strategies to help sustain their family woodland legacy.  Speakers include legal and financial experts experienced in estate planning; forest landowners who have worked through succession planning, and natural resource professionals who work with landowners to conserve and manage land.

“Few challenges faced by Virginia’s family forest landowners are more important than the concern of passing the family land and carrying its stewardship forward to the next generation,” said Mike Santucci, assistant director of forestland conservation with the Virginia Department of Forestry (VDOF). “Family forest landowners own their woodland for many reasons.  A consistent theme is that nearly all of them express a deep connection with their land and a desire to ‘do the right thing’ and leave a lasting legacy to their heirs.” 

Acknowledging the hard decisions landowners can face in deciding to make a succession plan for their property, Adam Downing, extension forestry agent with Virginia Cooperative Extension's Northern District region said, "Sometimes it's difficult for landowners to consider - 'what will happen to my forestland beyond my lifetime'? While many want to pass their forestland on to family members, only two percent to three percent have a plan in place to do so.  Without  a plan, landowners stand to lose more than just the property out of the family.  They risk their family heritage and a portion of the wealth they have accumulated over the years.”

Santucci said, “We’re on the verge of a huge intergenerational land transfer of forestland in Virginia. The decisions made by family forest owners, including how they will pass their forestland forward to future generations, play a crucial role in maintaining a viable forestland base in Virginia. These family woodlands are relied upon for not only the sustained flow of forest products, but for invaluable natural benefits, such as clean air and water, wildlife habitat and overall quality of life.”

Registration is now open through October 24th for the next offering of this award-wining and practical short course. Past participants have reported significant planning progress; thousands of dollars of financial savings, and family engagement as a result of this investment.

The workshop is co-sponsored by Virginia Cooperative Extension and the VDOF, with support from the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, the Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program at Virginia Tech, Virginia Tree Farm Committee, The Black Family Land Trust.

For registration and more information, please contact Neil Clark at southeast@vt.eduor (757) 653-2572.

Greensville/ Emporia Jr. 4-H Summer Camp - Let your child become part of the tradition!

What is the best thing to do when it is cold outside?  Plan for summer!  Greensville/ Emporia   4-H camp is the perfect way for your child to have a new, exciting experience this summer while making friends that will last a lifetime.  The 2017 Greensville/ Emporia 4-H Camp will be held July 10 – 14th at the beautiful Airfield 4-H Educational Center in Wakefield, VA.  A variety of camp classes, afternoon activities, and special evening programs are great fun for all youth. Camp class examples include swimming, archery, riflery, arts and crafts, canoeing, nature, cooking, fishing, leather craft, sports, theater arts, climbing wall, high ropes and much more!

Greensville/ Emporia 4-H Camp is open to all youth 9-13 years that are residents of Greensville/ Emporia.The cost of camp is $220 for the first child, $215 for a second child, and $200 for each additional child. Scholarship applications are available upon request at time of registration.

To register for camp, we are having a one-day sign-up this year.  The 2017 Greensville/ Emporia 4-H Camp Sign-up Day will be Saturday, March 18, 2017 beginning at 9:00 a.m. at the Greensville/Emporia Extension Office in Emporia, VA.  A non-refundable $40.00 deposit is due the day of camp sign-up. We accept cash in the exact amount (we do not keep change in the office), check, and money orders. We are not able to accept debit or credit cards.  4-H Camp Sign-up will continue until camp is full or 12:00 p.m. that day on a first come first serve basis. There will be a $15.00 credit towards your child’s camp balance to the first 15 campers to register on sign-up day!!!

Please contact the Greensville/Emporia Extension Office for further information or to request a brochure for more information (434) 348-4223 or drexel@vt.edu .

4-H Camp would not be possible without the help of adult volunteers.  There is no cost for an adult volunteer to attend camp, just the completion of camp training.   This is a great way to share this experience with your child!

If interested In Becoming an Adult Volunteer, contact the Extension Office for an application.

If you are a person with a disability and desire any assistive devices, services or other accommodations to participate in the 2017 4-H Camp, please contact Drexel W. Pierce, Jr. at the Extension Office no later than two weeks prior to the date assistance is needed.  Our office hours are Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. An equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. Edwin J. Jones, Director, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; M. Ray McKinnie,  Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State University, Petersburg

Virginia Housing Development Authority Homeownership Workshop Offered in Emporia

VHDA’s Home Ownership Education Workshop will be offered Monday, April 10th and Tuesday, April 11th from 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. at the Greensville/Emporia Extension Office located at 105 Oak Street, Emporia. Participants must attend both sessions in order to receive a certificate of completion.

The workshop is free and being coordinated by Virginia Cooperative Extension’s Greensville/Emporia Office and the Emporia- Greensville Financial Literacy Coalition. It is aimed at first-time homebuyers who are financially ready to become homeowners. The workshop covers the educational requirement for a VHDA mortgage and it may also count as first-time home buyer education for other loan programs.

Topics to be covered in this six-hour workshop include: Personal Finances, Credit and Credit Issues, Working with a Realtor, Role of the Lender, Loan Closing and the Home Inspection. Space is limited and registration is required. Please contact the Greensville/Emporia Extension Office at 434-348-4233 by Monday, April 3rd to register. You may also register online at www.vhda.com. A minimum of 5 participants must be registered for class to be conducted.

If you are a person with a disability and require assistance or accommodation to participate in this program, please call the Greensville/Emporia Extension Office at 434-348-4233 between the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. at least five days prior to this event. TDD number is 800-828-1120.

Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. An equal opportunity/affirmative action employer.

Field Day Focuses on Pastures and Forages To Help VA Small Farmers Meet High Demand For Goat and Sheep Meat

Pastures and forages will be the focus of Small Ruminant Field Day scheduled on Oct. 21 from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. at Virginia State University’s Randolph Farm, 4415 River Road, Ettrick. Sponsored by Virginia Cooperative Extension and VSU’s Small Farm Outreach Program, the educational event will inform goat and sheep producers about forages to plant and how to best manage and maintain them. Forages are bulky grazing animal foods such as grass or hay. "Forages and pastures are important when considering nutritional requirements but are just as salient to parasite control," said Dr. Dahlia O’Brien, VSU small ruminant extension specialist.

The program is $10 per person, which includes lunch, as well as hands-on hoof-trimming, drenching and vaccination demonstrations. Participants are encouraged to bring weeds from their property to have them identified by an on-site pasture weed specialist. “By identifying weeds, ranchers can employ safe, targeted methods of reducing a pasture’s weed load to maximize the nutrient-dense forage their animals need,” said O’Brien.

There is large and an unfilled demand for goat and sheep meat in the major cities of the United States, including metropolitan areas in Virginia. It is a staple of many ethnic groups, with about 60 to 70 percent of the world regularly eating goat meat. According to North Carolina State University, since 1991, the United States is a net importer of goat meat. In 2014, 43,188 million pounds of goat meat were imported for a total value of $94.7 million, compared to 2,994 million pounds in 1990 for a total value of $1.9 million. As populations from the Middle East, Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean increase, so does the demand for these meats, with goats and sheep of all ages often fetching premium prices.  Because goats and sheep can be raised on relatively small amounts of land, this lends an opportunity for many of Virginia’s smaller farmers to fill this niche. Virginia Cooperative Extension at VSU focuses on providing Extension assistance to the Commonwealth’s small, historically underserved and limited resource farmers and ranchers.

This year’s Small Ruminant Field Day is part of VSU’s interdisciplinary pilot program called “Goatober.” The program aims to grow Virginia’s goat industry through the month of October by helping goat farmers tackle their two major business obstacles: consumers’ lack of knowledge on how to find local goat farmers and their products, as well as their unfamiliarity with how to prepare goat meat. This initiative aims to introduce goat meat to Virginia consumers by raising awareness on how to prepare tasty goat dishes, as well as, where to find local producers.

To register for this event, visit http://www.ext.vsu.edu/calendar, click on the event and then click on the registration link, or contact Mollie Klein at (804) 524-6960 or email mklein@vsu.edu.

If you need further information or are a person with a disability and desire any assistive devices, services or other accommodations to participate in this activity, please contact Mollie Klein at mklein@vsu.edu or call (804) 524-6960 / (800) 828-1120 during business hours of 8 am. and 5 p.m. to discuss accommodations no later than five days prior to the event.

Extension is a joint program of Virginia Tech, Virginia State University, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and state and local governments. Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. An equal opportunity/ affirmative action employer. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. Edwin J. Jones, Director, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; M. Ray McKinnie, Interim Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State University, Petersburg.

STEM Specialist Seeks to Engage, Energize, Motivate Youth

Ettrick, Va. –  Charles Nealis, new STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) Cooperative Extension specialist at Virginia State University, portrays today’s student as a curious, passionate, techno-savvy innovator destined to change the world. Shortly after arriving at VSU, “Charlie” has hit the ground running, his sights set on increasing awareness of STEM opportunities and encouraging youth to pursue STEM careers.

“STEM subject matter helps students develop critical thinking skills and problem-solving capabilities vital to success in nearly every profession,” Nealis says. “Employers have come to expect this from their employees.”

Nealis says he’ll work closely with 4-H programs and local school systems to engage community youth in unique, cutting-edge, hands-on activities designed to equip them for the future.  “My job is to corral and funnel their creativity and enthusiasm to position them for success in our global, technological society,” he adds.

A Gainesville, Fla. native, Nealis  earned  each of his academic degrees from the University of Florida. His bachelor’s degree is in food and resource economics; his master’s degree in  agricultural  education and extension; and his doctorate in soil and water science.

An ardent Florida Gator fan, Charlie’s first priority is spending time with his wife and infant daughter. During his spare time, he enjoys basketball, hiking and fishing.

He can be reached at (804) 524-2583 or at cnealis@vsu.edu.

Extension is a joint program of Virginia Tech, Virginia State University, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and state and local governments. Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. An equal opportunity/ affirmative action employer. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. Edwin J. Jones, Director, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; M. Ray McKinnie, Interim Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State University, Petersburg.”

Learn About Hop Production at VSU

Beginning and established hop growers and others interested in growing and supplying hops and other brewing ingredients for the craft beer industry should attend a hop workshop scheduled Aug. 10 from 8 a.m. until 12 noon on Virginia State University¹s Randolph Farm, 4415 River Road, Ettrick. Participants will learn about the needs of craft brewers, hop production in the commonwealth, hop research on varieties at VSU, and take a tour of VSU¹s hop yard. This educational workshop, free and open to the public, is limited to the first 150 registrants.  Register online at www.ext.vsu.edu.

Anyone with a disability who desires assistive devices or other accommodations to participate, please contact VSU¹s Small Farm Outreach Program Office at (804)524-5626 (800) 828-1120 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.to discuss arrangements five days before the event.

Extension is a joint program of Virginia Tech, Virginia State University, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and state and local governments. Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. An equal opportunity/ affirmative action employer. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. Edwin J. Jones, Director, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; M.Ray McKinnie, Interim Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State University, Petersburg.

Fermentation 101

The Emporia Greensville Cooperative Extension recently presented a workshop on fermentation.

The two part class first met in June to learn about the fermentation process from Eric Bowen, the area Food Safety Agent.  While the process was explained with a decent amount of detail, there was also some hands-on learning involved.

After the process was explained, the group started to work on Sauerkraut.

    

Twenty-five pounds of fresh, local cabbage was shredded and mixed with canning salt.

After all of the cabbage was shredded and salted, it was packed into a stoneware crock and weighted down.

    

The crock was left to sit and let nature do her work for four weeks.

When the group met again in July, the sauerkraut had completely fermented.  The finished product was tart and slightly sweet. Most of the finished sauerkraut was packed into jars to be kept in the refrigerator, but several jars were hot water processed, making them shelf stable.

    

Presentation to Family & Consumer Services Extension Agent

1st. Place in Extension Home Demonstration Contest. Virginia Home Demonstration Scrapbook 1978. Designed by Merle Jesse, Modern Homemakers Club, and Handiwork by Lucye Brett, Pleasant Shade Club. Presented to Donna Daniel, Family & Consumer Sciences Extension Agent for the Extension Office by Otelia "Tillie" Harris, Extension Agent, Greensville and Emporia from 1956 to 1981.

A “Berry” Good Opportunity for Southside Virginia Farmers

Extension specialist Dr. Reza Rafie welcomes a farmer to Virginia State University’s Randolph Farm to learn more about growing blueberries in Virginia.

Virginia State University Cooperative Extension Specialists are looking for Southside Virginia farmers, especially those who formerly raised tobacco, who are interested in trying their hand at growing blackberries, blueberries or strawberries. Extension specialists believe the region has potential for satisfying the high demand for locally-grown berries.

"Locally-grown produce, especially berries, which are known to have significant health benefits, have experienced a sharp increase in consumer demand," explained Dr. Raza Rafie, VSU horticulture extension specialist. "We’ve done extensive research throughout central and southside Virginia, and we feel confident that the growing conditions are right for local farmers to help meet this demand.”

Identifying and assisting the new potential berry growers is part of a three-year Virginia Tobacco Indemnification and Community Revitalization Commission grant-funded project to promote berry crops as an alternative farm enterprise in the region. The $292,930 grant is the second phase to the successful $300,000 grant from the Commission in January 2011.

This second phase of the project will identify a total of 13 farmers who will each receive an acre of either blackberry, blueberry or strawberry plants (depending on the conditions of his/her farm), mulch, drip irrigation lines, a trellis system (for blackberry crop only), a temporary spreader, technical assistance and management information. The duration of this grant project is three years.  During that time project team members will provide educational assistance to each farmer in growing and marketing his/her berry crop.

To apply, farmers can obtain an application from their local agriculture and natural resource Cooperative Extension agent. A list of agents is available at http://www.ext.vt.edu/offices. For more information on the project farmers can also contact Jonathan Bobby at 434-9418471 or jonbob2629@gmail.com. Applications are due Thursday, July 30, 2016. 

Extension is a joint program of Virginia Tech, Virginia State University, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and state and local governments. Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. An equal opportunity/ affirmative action employer. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. Edwin J. Jones, Director, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; M. Ray McKinnie, Interim Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State University, Petersburg.

Upcoming Events at the Virginia Cooperative Estension

All workshops FREE unless noted. Take note, many events have registration deadlines. If you have any questions or wish to sign up for a class, contact the Greensville/Emporia Extension Office at 434-348-4223.

*NEW:Jul 5, 12, 19, 26: 1:00-3:00PM: Master Gardener Help Desk. The Master Gardeners will be at the Greensville/Emporia Extension Office at 105 Oak Street in Emporia every Tuesday in July

Aug 8th: 4-H Jr. Summer Camp. The 4-H Jr. Summer Camp will be August 8th-12th at the beautiful Airfield 4-H Educational Center in Wakefield, VA. 4-H camp is open to all youth ages 9-13. The cost of camp is $210. A non-refundable $40.00 deposit is due at sign-up. We accept check, money order and cash in the exact amount (we do not keep change in the office). Scholarship applications are available in request. For more information, call 434-348-4223 or stop by the Greensville/Emporia Extension Office at 105 Oak Street in Emporia.

Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. An equal opportunity/affirmative action employer.Extension is a joint program of Virginia Tech, Virginia State University, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and state and local governments.

Virginia Cooperative Extension motivates Greensville/Emporiaresidents to Get Moving! with a web-facilitated, statewide 8-week program

By Donna Daniel, Family and Consumer Sciences Agent 

GREENSVILLES/EMPORIA March 14, 2016 -  Most Virginians want to stay fit, be physically active, and eat a healthier diet, but have difficulty finding the time, energy, and motivation to get moving. FitEx (www.fit-ex.org) – is an 8-week physical activity program developed by Virginia Cooperative Extension.  It helps Virginians improve their exercise habits, diet, and overall quality of life in a fun and challenging way.

Greensville/Emporia residents who are interested in FitEx or have questions about the program or are interested in signing-up should visit the website at www.fit-ex.org or contact Donna Daniel, Family & Consumer Science Extension Agent at ddaniel@vt.edu or 434-348-4223 before April 2nd (registration deadline). The program begins on April 3rd and lasts until May 28th.

FitEx encourages all participants to engage in at least 30 minutes of moderate physical activity such as brisk walking, running, yoga, or biking on five or more days of the week. “This adds up to at least 150 minutes of exercise each week, the amount of aerobic physical activity recommended for adults by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services,” said Samantha Harden, Assistant Professor of Human Nutrition, Food, and Exercise at Virginia Tech. Over the previous iterations of FitEx years, over 2,000 FitEx participants increased their physical activity by an average of 54 minutes per week and have eaten over 70,000 cups of fruits and vegetables per week - that’s 560,000 cups over the duration of the program!

FitEx encourages co-workers, friends, and family members join together in teams of six. Each team has a captain who helps the group set goals for its personal achievement.

The program also includes a nutrition component that promotes increased fruit and vegetable consumption.  Prior to participating in last year’s FitEx program, less than 30% of adult participants were meeting the national recommendations for fruit and vegetable consumption, but by the end of the program, well over 70% of participants were meeting the recommendations.

About Virginia Cooperative Extension

Virginia Cooperative Extension (www.ext.vt.edu/) brings the resources of Virginia’s land-grant universities, Virginia Tech and Virginia State University, to the people of the commonwealth. Through a system of on-campus specialists and locally based agents, it delivers education in the areas of agriculture and natural resources, family and consumer sciences, community viability, and 4-H youth development. With a network of faculty at two universities, 107 county and city offices, 13 agricultural research and Extension centers, and six 4-H educational centers, Virginia Cooperative Extension provides solutions to the problems facing Virginians today.

 

If you are a person with a disability and desire assistance or accommodation, please notify the Greensville/Emporia Extension Office at (434) 348-4223 during business hours of Monday – Friday 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. *TDD number is (800) 828-1120.

 

Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. An equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. Edwin J. Jones, Director, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; M. Ray McKinnie, Interim Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State University, Petersburg.

Court-Ordered Parenting Classes – Living Apart, Parenting Together

When a family goes through divorce or separation, parents need to help their children adjust to the changes in their family. Our educational program, “Living Apart, Parenting Together” teaches parents about the impact of divorce/separation and gives them strategies to help both parents and children adjust to a new way of being a family.

Classes are scheduled for:

  • Monday, February 15, 2016 - 9 am-1 pm
  • Monday, April 11, 2016 - 5 pm-9 pm
  • Monday, June 13, 2016 - 9 am-1 pm
  • Monday, August 15, 2016 - 5 pm-9 pm
  • Monday, October 17, 2016 - 5 pm-9 pm.

Classes are held by Donna Daniel, Family and Consumer Sciences Extension Agent at the Virginia Cooperative Extension, Greensville/Emporia Office. Class fee and pre-registration is required. For more information or to register call 434-348-4223 or stop by the Greensville/Emporia Extension office at 105 Oak Street in Emporia.

If you are a person with a disability and desire any assistive devices, services or other accommodations to participate in this activity, please the Greensville/Emporia Extension Office at (434) 348-4223 during business hours of Monday – Friday 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. to discuss accommodations 5 days prior to the event.*TDD number is (800) 828-1120.

Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. An equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. Edwin J. Jones, Director, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; M. Ray McKinnie, Interim Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State University, Petersburg.

Extension Agent Master Gardener's Wreath Making Class

Article by Lynn Moseley, Master Gardener

On Saturday, Dec. 5th, the Master Gardeners of Greensville/Emporia had their annual live Wreath Making Workshop.  Our class had 14 attend and had several repeat attendees along with many new faces!  It is our hope to be able to accept more in in the future as this is always our biggest project for the year and unfortunately we had to turn a few away.  As you can see from the pictures there is a large amount of work that goes into making these wreaths.  All instructions and materials are given at the beginning of the class so they can start at the same time.  Participants were shown one finished product to use as an example.  After several hours of working on their own, everyone creates their own vision with an end result of 14 completely different wreaths!  All of them were so beautiful and a good time is always had by all.  Light refreshments are always included along with wonderful Christmas music for inspiration.  We are already planning and looking forward to next year.  Maybe you would like to come!  Hope so!  And Happy Holidays!

"Nourish Your Digestive System” Program Offered in Emporia

Did you know that digestive disorders are among the most common problems in health care today? About 30 to 40 percent of adults say they experience frequent indigestion, and more than 50 million visits are made every year to health-care facilities for symptoms related to the digestive system. Experiencing digestive issues may not mean that you have a severe problem. Some of your daily behaviors may simply be disrupting normal digestion.

Join us Tuesday, August 11 at 6 p.m. for “Nourish Your Digestive System”.  This program will take place at the Greensville/Emporia Extension Office at 105 Oak Street Emporia, Virginia.  You will become familiar with the digestive system and ways to improve your digestive health.  Learn to nourish your digestive system and become healthier in the process.

There is no cost to attend this program, but participants must register to attend by Friday, August 7. For more information or to register, call the Greensville/Emporia Extension Office at 434-348-4233.

Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. An equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. If you are a person with a disability and require assistance or accommodation to participate in this program, please call the Greensville/Emporia Extension Office at 434-348-4233 between the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. at least five days prior to this event. TDD number is 800-828-1120.

“Nourish Your Skin” Program Offered in Emporia

Ever find yourself wondering how to combat dry skin and wrinkles?  The remedy could be as simple as the foods that you eat! Join us for an intriguing program on skin health and anti-aging techniques.

The “Nourish Your Skin” program will be held at the Greensville/Emporia Extension Office at 105 Oak Street Emporia, Virginia on Wednesday, July 8, at 6:00 p.m.  This program will focus on antioxidant rich foods that promote skin health and anti-aging.  You will also learn to make age defying, antioxidant- rich facial masks.  Come prepared to laugh, learn and become healthier in the process. 

The cost for this program is $5.00, and participants must register to attend by Thursday, July 2. For more information or to register, call Amy Hawkins, Family and Consumer Sciences Extension Agent at the Greensville/Emporia Extension Office at 434-348-4233.

Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of age, color, disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. An equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. If you are a person with a disability and require assistance or accommodation to participate in this program, please call the Greensville/Emporia Extension Office at 434-348-4233 between the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. at least five days prior to this event. TDD number is 800-828-1120.

Tia Powell Receives Outstanding Performance Award

While attending the Virginia Cooperative Extension Multi-State Nutrition Assistants’ Conference in Roanoke, VA May 5-8, Tia Powell received the Outstanding Performance Award for the Central District.  This award is given to the nutrition program assistants who see beyond the reality to the possibility.  They are individuals who propel the program to the highest level.  They exceed their workload targets and impact goals and have firmly established collaborative relationships with multiple agencies within their county.  Their teaching techniques and ability to make program fun and inviting often result in a waiting list for their programs.  Tia Powell readily accepts new and unusual projects while excelling at her job expectations.  Last year, Tia enrolled 969 youth as a split SNAP-Ed Program assistant, in addition to 68 adult clients.  She was the first in the state to start classes in Eat Smart, Move More and Slim Down.

Home Canning Workshop Offered

Greensville/Emporia Cooperative Extension Office is having a Home Canning workshop to learn proper canning techniques on Saturday, July 26th from 10:00am – 12:00pm. Participation is limited. The registration fee is $5.00 and you must be registered to attend. Registration deadline is Friday July 18th. Please contact the Greensville/Emporia Extension Office at (434)348-4233 for more information or to attend.

SCOUTING, SCOUTING, AND SCOUTING

Sclerotinia Blight Advisory

Sclerotinia blight has been confirmed in a peanut field in Surry County, VA. According to the Sclerotinia advisory, the current risk for Sclerotinia in Virginia is HIGH and scouting for the disease is recommended. Cool temperatures and high humidity favor disease development. Signs and symptoms of Sclerotinia blight include rapid wilting and death of infected branches, bleaching of stems, and white, fluffy fungal growth on stems, leaves, or pegs. Once Sclerotinia is identified in a field, a fungicide spray such as Omega is the best way to limit further development of the disease. Foliar fungicide applications may be needed in fields with a 2- or 3-year peanut rotation if the crop has reached R3 (beginning pod stage). Fields with a 4-year or longer rotation do not need a foliar fungicide application until R5 (beginning seed stage).  According to the Virginia leaf spot advisory, the last effective spray dates for peanut leaf spots are the following: June 18 (Suffolk), June 20 (Southhampton - Capron), June 18 (Greensville – Skippers), June 20 (Sussex – Waverly). Fungicide applications for foliar diseases may increase severity of Sclerotinia blight.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Southern Rust on Corn in North Carolina

Southern rust, a potentially devastating disease of corn, has been reported from several counties in North Carolina. At this time, southern rust has NOT been reported in Virginia. Samples of corn plants suspected to be infected with southern rust should be submitted to your local extension office or the disease clinic at the Virginia Tech Tidewater AREC (contact Dr. Hillary Mehl, hlmehl@vt.edu). Signs of the disease are pustules filled with powdery masses of orange spores (see attached photo). Typically the disease has little impact on Virginia corn since it arrives too late in the season to affect yield, but if southern rust is confirmed in Virginia prior to corn reaching the dent stage (R5), fungicide applications may be warranted. Updates will be provided as more information is obtained.

 

For more information on fungicide recommendations, scouting techniques, thresholds recommendations contact your local extension agent Brittany A. Council at (434)-348-4233.

GES Growing Green

Encouraging healthy eating and growth one student at a time!

The Greensville Elementary School “Growing Green” initiative has been successfully sprouting since 2012. Each growing season students are invited out to the garden to assist with planting seeds chosen by their class.  At this time we get to find out what they know about gardens, plants, and agriculture. The garden is maintained during the growing period by Peggy Loveless(VCE 4-H/Master Gardener Volunteer), Brittany A. Council(Agriculture & Natural Resources Extension Agent), & Ms. Porcher Bradley(GES Guidance Counselor) in addition to participating classes. This project promotes teamwork, self-respect, responsibility, and a sense of accomplishment within the students because of the end result; reaping the harvest of their hard-work.

Each year we make sure to plant items that the students will enjoy and recognize and so far lettuce seems to be a big hit. This year courtesy of Peg’s Flower Power and Wooten Bros. Nursery, students were able to see tomatoes, eggplants, cucumbers, peas, peppers, cauliflower, broccoli, kale, cabbage, lettuce, squash, chives, sage, and a host of other herbs and flowers. Once all the produce matured we held our annual taste testing with the students where they enjoyed lettuce and cucumbers grown fresh from their garden boxes. By offering students the opportunity to grow their own produce and seeing them genuinely enjoying the fruits of their labor a pathway towards agriculture appreciation is created. Greensville/Emporia is a highly rural area and we need to educate our youth about where their food is coming from and show them how they can grow their own. If we all work together to promote healthy eating and support local producers we can keep the continuing cycle of agriculture alive through our youth.

To find out more about the “GES Growing Green” initiative please feel free to contact Brittany A. Council at (434)-348-4233. Make sure you stop by and check out our beautiful gardens!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mayor Presents Proclimation Honoring a Century of the Virginia Cooporative Extension

Proclamation

Declaring May 1 -31, 2014 as

National Cooperative Extension Centennial Celebration Month

Whereas,Virginia Cooperative Extension of Greensville/Emporia is part of the nationwide Cooperative Extension System that is a partnership of federal, state and local governments and Virginia Tech and Virginia State University, the state’s land-grant universities in Virginia; and

              Whereas,the Smith-Lever Act of 1914 established the Cooperative Extension Service, utilizing faculty serving as Extension Agents, who along with local staff and community-based resources, extend University research and knowledge to local communities; and

           Whereas,Virginia Cooperative Extension provides wide-ranging educational programs and information in the areas of agriculture, natural resources, family and consumer sciences, 4-H youth development, food, nutrition and health, along with related areas of economic and workforce development across Virginia; and

           Whereas,Virginia Cooperative Extension programs in Family and Consumer Sciences; Agriculture and Natural Resources; 4-H Youth Development, and Community Viability, benefit families, schools and businesses in Greensville/Emporia; and

            Now, Therefore, I, Mary L. Person, by virtue of the authority vested in me as Mayor of the City of Emporia, Virginia do hereby designated May 2014 as National Cooperative Extension Centennial Celebration Month and encourage all residents to take advantage of the programs and educational opportunities that Virginia Cooperative Extension offers to the community.

Done this 6th day of May in the year 2014.

Community Garden Boxes For Rent

The Greensville/Emporia Extension Office has four community garden boxes available for rent! Please assist us in enhancing community beautification within our beloved community. Have you always wanted to grow your own produce but had limited space? Do you like gardening with others who enjoy your same passion? Adopt a box today!! Adopt a box fee of $50.00 will allow your organization to have their name on the garden box. A $25.00 non-refundable deposit is due to reserve your box and the remainder is due prior to planting.

All seeds will be provided in addition to gardening tools, however, you are still welcome to bring your own seeds and tools if you choose. We encourage all participants to donate their produce to a group of their choice. Fall planting is scheduled from September to January and spring planting from March (or after last frost) to July. February and August are the months that all boxes will receive maintenance. The Greensville/Emporia Extension Office will provide each garden box occupant with a “Growing for You” packet full of valuable information that will assist you in your gardening endeavors. We are very excited about this project and look forward to growing with you!

You may print the application here.  For more details please feel free to contact Brittany A. Council at 434-348-4233 or stop by the Greensville/Emporia Extension Office at 105 Oak Sreet.

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