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July 2017

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Career Opportunity

Residential Counselors

(Youth Service Workers)

 

Job#: 2017-10

If you are interested in making a positive impact on the lives of Virginia’s youth, then we want you to become part of our Team!  Rural Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facility located in Jarratt, Virginia seeks positive role models to work directly with adolescent boys and girls in a psychiatric residential treatment program.  The Youth Service Worker is responsible for role-modeling healthy behavior, teaching life skills, administering a trauma informed behavioral support program, and leading youth in and participating in social, cultural, and recreational activities.  This position supervises youth in the residential unit and on off-campus activities and appointments.

Must possess the availability to work weekends, evenings, holidays, and nights.  Supreme flexibility required. 

Seeking candidates with Bachelor’s Degrees in Psychology, Sociology or other Human Services field.   Experience will be considered in lieu of a degree.

Compensation package includes 401(k) retirement plan & employer sponsored health, dental, vision & life insurance.  JBHS is a Drug Free Workplace.  Successful applicants must pass a pre-employment drug screen and criminal background screening.  EOE.  Positions opened until filled.

E-mail cover letter and resume to:

Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services
Attn: Chris Thompson
Job # 2017-10
E-mail:careers@jacksonfeild.org

South Hill Moose Lodge Donates to Health Care for Life Capital Campaign

SOUTH HILL, VA– Ken Kurz (right), Director of Marketing & Development at VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital, received a generous donation from Jim Bowersock, Governor of Moose Lodge #1872 in South Hill.  The donation will benefit VCU Health CMH’s Health Care for Life Capital Campaign.

Donations are still being accepted.  For more information about the capital campaign, please contact the CMH Foundation at 434-774-2575 or email Kurz at Kenneth.Kurz@vcuhealth.org.

Elizabeth Williams Luke

Elizabeth Williams Luke of Emporia, VA died July 27th at Medical College of Virginia after a brief illness. Daughter of the late Elmer Marks and Mary Sledge Williams, she was born May 21, 1933, a graduate of Louise Obici School of Nursing, she practiced her profession in Franklin, VA and in Emporia, VA with family practitioners until retiring. Betty is survived by her husband, Judge James A. Luke; son, Douglas Daughtrey and his wife Brenda; sisters, Joyce W. Owen and husband Glen and Alice W. Hughes; three nieces, Terry Hughes, Kim Valentine and Vickie Britt and five great-nieces. A faithful member of First Presbyterian Church in Emporia for over fifty years, she had taught Sunday School, active in Presbyterian Women and sang in the choir. A memorial service will be held at First Presbyterian Church, Emporia, VA, July 31st at 11:00 AM. A visitation will be held at 10:30 AM prior to the service. In lieu of flowers, please consider First Presbyterian Church, 210 South Main Street, Emporia, VA 23847 or Greensville Volunteer Rescue Squad, 513 South Main Street, Emporia, VA 23847. Condolences may be sent to www.Echolsfuneralhome.com 

WHY IT PAYS TO KEEP A CAREFUL EYE ON YOUR EARNINGS RECORD

By Jackie Weisgarber, Social Security Public Affairs Specialist in Richmond, Virginia

Whether you’re ready to retire, just joining the workforce, or somewhere in between, regularly reviewing your Social Security earnings record could make a big difference when it’s time to collect your retirement benefits.

Just think, in some situations, if an employer did not properly report just one year of your work earnings to us, your future benefit payments from Social Security could be close to $100 per month less than they should be. Over the course of a lifetime, that could cost you tens of thousands of dollars in retirement or other benefits to which you are entitled.

Social Security prevents many mistakes from ever appearing on your earnings record. On average, we process about 236 million W-2 wage reports from employers, representing more than $5 trillion in earnings. More than 98 percent of these wages are successfully posted with little problem.

But it’s ultimately the responsibility of your employers — past and present — to provide accurate earnings information to Social Security so you get credit for the contributions you’ve made through payroll taxes. We rely on you to inform us of any errors or omissions. You’re the only person who can look at your lifetime earnings record and verify that it’s complete and correct.

So, what’s the easiest and most efficient way to validate your earnings record?

o    Visit www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount to set up or sign in to your own my Social Security account;

o    Under the “My Home” tab, click on “Earnings Record” to view your online Social Security Statement and taxed Social Security earnings;

o    Carefully review each year of listed earnings and use your own records, such as W-2s and tax returns, to confirm them; and

o    Keep in mind that earnings from this year and last year may not be listed yet.

If you notice that you need to correct your earnings record, check out our one-page fact sheet at www.socialsecurity.gov/pubs/EN-05-10081.pdf.

Sooner is definitely better when it comes to identifying and reporting problems with your earnings record. As time passes, you may no longer have past tax documents and some employers may no longer be in business or able to provide past payroll information.

If it turns out everything in your earnings record is correct, you can use the information and our online calculators at www.socialsecurity.gov/planners/benefitcalculators.html to plan for your retirement and prepare for the unexpected, such as becoming disabled or leaving behind survivors. We use your top 35 years of earnings when we calculate your benefit amounts. You can learn more about how your benefit amount is calculated at www.socialsecurity.gov/pubs/10070.pdf.

We’re with you throughout life’s journey, from starting your first job to receiving your well-earned first retirement payment.  Learn more about the services we provide online at www.socialsecurity.gov/onlineservices.

ROUTE 301 (SUSSEX DRIVE) BRIDGE REPLACEMENT PROJECT COMPLETED

The road has reopened, and the detour has been removed

GREENSVILLE COUNTY–Crews have successfully replaced the Sussex Drive Bridge, which carries traffic southbound over the CSX railroad tracks, north of Emporia. The project team has removed a detour, and traffic is flowing.

Curtis Contracting was awarded the $4.8 million contract after it was advertised in September 2014. The crew began construction of the new southbound bridge May 18, 2015, and completed the project on time. Traffic patterns for travelers headed north on Route 301 were not changed during the project.

Learn More About SVCC's Power Line Worker Training Program

Learn more about the Power Line Worker Training Program at Southside Virginia Community College on Wednesday, August 16, 2017.  The informational event begins at 6 p.m. at the SVCC Occupational/Technical Center located at 1041, W 10th Street, Pickett Park, Blackstone, Virginia.

Those interested can learn about admission requirements, schedule, cost, housing, job prospects and scholarships.  Please register by emailing susan.early@southside.edu  Pizza will be served.  (Use the Main Entrance to drive onto the base.)

Robert Luther Saffelle Jr.

Robert Luther Saffelle, Jr., 86, of Burlington died on Sunday, July 23, 2017. Originally from Emporia, VA, he was the son of the late Dr. Robert Luther Saffelle and Virginia Vincent Saffelle. He is survived by his wife of 62 years, Elizabeth Islin Saffelle; son Robert Nelson Saffelle and wife Constance Hall Saffelle of Richmond, VA and their children Elizabeth Hall Saffelle and Katherine Virginia Saffelle; and daughter Ginger Saffelle Elliott and husband John VanTuyl Elliott of Winston-Salem, NC and their children Ashley Elizabeth Elliott, Anna Virginia Elliott, John Robert Elliott and Mary Elizabeth Elliott.

He is also survived by his sister, Patsy Saffelle Ferguson, of Emporia, VA and predeceased by his sisters, Bette Saffelle Milam and Virginia (Ginger) Vincent Saffelle.

He graduated from Hampden-Sydney College in 1955, where he was captain of the tennis team and a member of Theta Chi fraternity. He was a Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Marine Corps., stationed in Quantico, VA. He started his 35-year career with Wachovia Bank and Trust Company in Winston-Salem, NC, transferred to Salisbury, NC and then to Burlington where he served as City Executive for the Burlington and Alamance County offices. He was a 1974 graduate of the Executive Program of Professional Management Education at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. After retiring from Wachovia in 1989, he served as Treasurer of Carolina Biological Supply Co. until 1994.

He was a member of Front Street United Methodist Church and served on the Board of Directors of Alamance County Hospital, the Burlington YMCA and the Burlington-Alamance County Merchants Association. He also served as President of the United Way-Burlington/Alamance County, the Cherokee Council-Boy Scouts of America and the Alamance Country Club. He received the Kiwanis Club Citizen of the Year award and the Silver Beaver award from the Boy Scouts of America, the highest volunteer award in scouting.

The family wishes to thank the many caregivers, including the private nurses and those from Home Instead Senior Care and Hospice/Palliative Care of Alamance-Caswell, for their heartfelt care and support. A service to celebrate his life will be held at 11:00 a.m. on Friday, July 28, 2017, at Front Street United Methodist Church, with a reception to follow. A private burial for the family will be held at Alamance Memorial Park prior to the service.

Memorial contributions may be made to Front Street United Methodist Church, 136 S. Fisher Street, Burlington, NC 27215; and Hospice/Palliative Care of Alamance-Caswell, 914 Chapel Hill Road, Burlington, NC 27215.

Meherrin Regional Governor School Concludes 2017 Session

Meherrin Regional Governor School has concluded another successful summer program.  Our 4th and 5th grade students, under the direction of Gail Staton and Melissa Harrison, studied Oceanography and Geology.  They went to Luray Caverns and Vulcan for their field trips this year. Summer Jones and Chardonay Boyce were our student volunteers for the summer helping the teachers run the program.

Meherrin Regional Governor School has finished up another successful year.  These students are our 6th and 7th grade students who studied either space exploration or environmental science.  Lindsey Gordon, Josh Howerton and Kristina Jenkins were our student volunteers who helped the teacher with their studies.  This group took a trip to Chantilly to the space museum and went to the Lawrenceville Park for Geocaching.

VCU Health CMH Team Member of the Month

(Left to Right)W. Scott Burnette, CEO, VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital presented Lovellah Ballesteros, Registered Nurse on West Wing, the VCU Health CMH STAR Service Team Member of the Month Award for May.  There to congratulate Lovellah was Mellisa Black, Acute Care Nursing Director, and Ursula Butts, Vice President of Patient Care Services.

Lovellah has been employed at VCU Health CMH for 13 years.  Her dedication and work ethic are just two of the qualities that make her a wonderful asset to VCU Health CMH.  The nomination form submitted on her behalf stated, “One of the friendliest people I have ever met.  She is very professional, yet very welcoming.  It was a pleasure to have Lovellah care for me.  I believe you should give credit where it’s due and she deserves it.”  “Lovellah is a true team player.  She is an asset to our department.  Her patients consistently praise her and team members confide in her as a clinical expert.  Lovellah is very deserving of this award.”

In addition to the award certificate, Lovellah received a STAR Service lapel pin, letter of commendation from Administration, a $40 gift certificate, and a parking place of her choice for the month.

Lovellah resides in South Hill, VA.

New State Board Chair Focused on Increasing Community College Enrollments

RICHMOND – Eleanor Saslaw begins her yearlong term as the chair of the Virginia State Board for Community College this month, and she is focusing on increasing community college enrollment.

Serving on the board for the last three years – including one year as the Board’s vice chair – represents only a fraction of the experience Saslaw brings to the post. After all, the two-time college graduate has spent her entire career working in education. Her experience ranges from being a teacher, counselor and director of student services in Fairfax County Public Schools, to serving as the president of the Virginia Counselors Association, to serving as a member of and the president of the Virginia Board of Education.

Saslaw says educating an individual may just be the most important thing you can do for them and the community they live in.

“If you don’t educate people, you end up supporting them,” she said. “We want to see Virginians succeeding in the 21st century; that includes new Virginians. More education means a higher standard of living. It means our businesses thrive, and it means our tax base is strong. Our community colleges do a terrific job of helping people get there.”

Saslaw is placing a priority for the coming year on helping Virginia’s Community College serve more people. The colleges are seeking ways to reverse several years of enrollment declines. Saslaw wants the Board to ensure the colleges have the tools and knowledge to turn that around.

“Chancellor DuBois and I have been talking about that and he shares my concerns,” Saslaw said. “We’ve had good luck in the past using the task force model to address big, statewide challenges. It may be time to do that here.”

Saslaw was born in San Francisco and moved to the East Coast when she was eleven. She and her husband, state Senator Dick Saslaw (D-Fairfax County) moved to Virginia after getting married. They have a daughter who works as a lawyer in San Francisco.

“I feel like I gave something back with that one,” Saslaw said.

Saslaw has won numerous awards including the Friend of School Psychologists Award (2011) and Counselor of the Year (1998 and 1994). She has a master’s degree in secondary counseling and a bachelor’s degree in social studies education.
 

Great Fun at the Library

The Meherrin Regional Library System invites you to join us for Uncle Henry’s “Animals with Class” on Thursday, July 27th. This fun and educational show will feature animals and interesting facts about their habitats. This program will be held at 10:30 AM at the Brunswick County Library, Lawrenceville, and at 2:00 PM at the Richardson Memorial Library, Emporia.

Event begins promptly and seating is limited to a first come basis. For more information contact the Brunswick County Library at 434-848-2418, ext. 301, the Richardson Memorial Library at 434-634-2539, or visit www.meherrinlib.org.

Monday Morning Movies will conclude for the summer on Monday, July 31st with a showing of the new live-action Beauty and the Beast. This movie is rated PG and is 129 minutes long. The movie will be shown at 10:30 AM at both the Brunswick County Library and the Richardson Memorial Library. Snacks are welcomed. Children under the age of 10 must be supervised.

Frances Elizabeth Wyche Carter

Frances Elizabeth Wyche Carter was born April 4, 1939 to the late Dora Wyche Easter and the late Sidney Stith in Emporia Virginia.

Frances formative years were spent in Emporia, more specifically in "White City". At an early age she accepted Christ at Royal Baptist Church. She was a 1956 graduate of Edward W. Wyatt High School. It was at Wyatt she met the love of her life.

In 1960, Frances married the late Joseph Harrison Carter and without reservations moved to the state of New Jersey to start their life. Their union was blessed with four daughters and a son. After many years in New Jersey they returned home to Emporia. 

Upon returning to Emporia, Frances became actively involved in the community. She reunited with Royal Baptist Church where she became the first female to be ordained a Deacon. Along with her childhood friend Mary Anderson and cousin Elosie Moore, she became an entrepreneur and they opened "CAM Hair Replacement Center . France's involvement in the community did not stop there. She was an active member of the Democratic Party, Save the Training School Committee, and the Black Pot Catering Service. Frances remained in Emporia until her health begin to decline. 

On the morning of July 14, 2017, the 24th Anniversary of her husband's departure, France transitioned. She was preceded in death by her daughters Sheree W. Moody and Gina C. Turner.

Those left to cherish her memories are her son Sherown Carter (Caprice); her daughters Lisa Saunders, Debra Carter and Jo Monique Drikard; her son-in-law Rickey Turner, her brother S. Delacy Stith (Leah); twelve grandchildren; five great grandchildren; numerous cousins, countless friends and acquaintances. 

Elizabeth “Lib” Suiter Robinson

Elizabeth “Lib” Suiter Robinson, 87, of Skippers, VA, was welcomed into the Kingdom of Heaven on July 21, 2017 surrounded by the love of her family. Elizabeth was a native of Garysburg, NC; daughter of the late John Arthur Suiter, Sr. and Myrtle Anderton Suiter. She was predeceased by her husband of 48 years, William Augustus Robinson, Sr.; sister, Peggy Watkins Slade; and brother, John Arthur Suiter, Jr. She is survived by her children: Susan Meares of Raleigh, NC and husband, Gary; William Augustus Robinson, Jr. of Skippers and his wife, Betsy; Martha Williamson of Chesapeake, VA and husband, Mark; Alice Kish of Manakin Sabot, VA and husband, Wayne; and Mary Strickler of Manakin Sabot, VA and husband, Charles; her grandchildren, Allison Meares Colquitt and husband Joseph; Matthew and Emily Robinson; Tyler, Brian and Stuart Williamson; Richard Kish and his wife Brooke; Mary Katherine and David Kish; and William Strickler; her sister-in-law, Joyce B. Suiter and many nieces, nephews and cousins all of whom she cherished dearly.

Elizabeth graduated from Weldon High School in 1948 and St. Mary’s College in 1950, and attended the Pan American Business School in Richmond, VA. She was a devoted wife and mother whose greatest joy was spending time with family and friends. All who experienced the warm embrace of her gracious hospitality were truly blessed. Elizabeth enjoyed serving in her community as a member of Spring United Methodist Church, the Riparian Women’s Club, the Women’s Committee of the Greensville County Farm Bureau, a Girl Scout leader, and a Cub Scout leader. In 1983 she began a Real Estate career in Emporia, VA which provided numerous opportunities for her to welcome and befriend many newcomers.

A special thanks is extended to the caregivers who loved and cared for our Mother while she was on hospice. Your compassion and many acts of kindness were a blessing.

The family will receive friends from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., on Sunday, July 23rd at the Robinson's home (2385 Spring Church Road, Skippers, Virginia). A funeral service will be held on Monday at 11a.m., July 24th, t Spring United Methodist Church, (697 Spring Church Road, Skippers, Virginia 23879). Interment will follow in the church cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to Spring United Methodist Church. Online condolences may be shared with the family at www.owenfh.com.

Wanda Allen Lankford

Wanda Allen Lankford, 61, passed away on July 20, 2017 at VCU MCV in Richmond, Virginia. She is preceded in death by her mother, Barbara Vincent Allen, and her brother, Larry Dean Allen. Wanda is survived by a daughter, Jessica Lankford Hevener and her husband Michael; her father, Lewis D. Allen; and brothers, J. W. Allen (Patricia), Randy Allen, Stanley Allen (Cindy), and Barry Allen; nieces and nephews, Ashley (Adam) and Ryan, Kathleen (Dwayne), Brianna and David; great nieces and nephews, Elijah, Dyson and Sarah; Rachel and Nate.

Wanda was a Nurse Practitioner who recently worked at Central State Hospital in Petersburg, Virginia. She also worked at Lawrenceville Correctional Center in Lawrenceville, Virginia and worked for many years at Greensville Memorial Hospital in Emporia, Virginia.

Wanda was a caregiver to people and animals alike.  She loved her family and friends and would lend a helping hand to anyone.

Wanda was an active member of Purdy Baptist Church in Purdy, Virginia, where she sang in the choir.

A memorial service will be held Saturday, July 22, 2017 at 2 p.m. at Purdy Baptist Church, 186 Smoky Ordinary Road, Emporia, Virginia 23847.  The family will receive friends after the service in the fellowship hall.

In lieu of flowers donations may be made to Purdy Baptist Church or the Alzheimer’s Association or a charity of your choice. 

Virginia Producers Have Until Aug. 1, to Submit FSA County Committee Nominations

Richmond, VA, July 17, 2017 — The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA) Acting Executive Director for Virginia, James M. Dunn today reminded farmers and ranchers that they have until Aug. 1, 2017, to nominate eligible candidates to serve on local FSA county committees.

County committees are made up of farmers and ranchers elected by other producers in their communities to guide the delivery of farm programs at the local level. Committee members play a critical role in the day-to-day operations of FSA. Committees consist of three to 11 members and meet once a month or as needed to make important decisions on disaster and conservation programs, emergency programs, commodity price support loan programs, county office employment and other agricultural issues. Members serve three-year terms. Nationwide there are over 7,700 farmer and ranchers serving on FSA county committees.

"The Aug. 1 deadline is quickly approaching,” said Dunn. "If you know of a great candidate or want to nominate yourself to serve on your local county committee, go to your county FSA office right now and submit the nomination form. I especially encourage the nomination of beginning farmers and ranchers, as well as women and minorities. This is your opportunity to have a say in how federal programs are delivered in your county.”

To be eligible to serve on an FSA county committee, a person must participate or cooperate in an agency administered program, and reside in the local administrative area where the election is being held. A complete list of eligibility requirements, more information and nomination forms are available at http://www.fsa.usda.gov/elections.

All nominees must sign the nomination form FSA-669A. All nomination forms for the 2017 election must be postmarked or received in the local FSA county office by Aug. 1, 2017. Ballots will be mailed to eligible voters by Nov. 6 and are due back to the local USDA Service Centers on Dec. 4. The newly elected county committee members will take office Jan. 1, 2018.

Dr. Michael Tozzi Joins VCU Health CMH

South Hill – VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital in South Hill would like to welcome Dr. Michael Tozzi to our family of health care providers.  Dr. Tozzi specializes in General Surgery.

Dr. Tozzi comes to VCU Health CMH with more than 18 years of medical experience and most recently worked for Halifax Surgical Associates in South Boston, VA.  Dr. Tozzi is not new to South Hill as he owned and operated his own practice, Lake Country Surgical P.L.C from 2002-2013 and was also a Staff Physician and the Director of the Outpatient Wound Care Clinic at CMH from 1999-2013. 

Dr. Tozzi received his Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine Degree from Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  He completed his residency in General Surgery from City Avenue Hospital, Germantown Hospital and Parkview Hospital, all located in Philadelphia.  He is board certified by the American Board of Osteopathic Medicine.

He is married to his wife Angela and has two sons, Geoffrey and Jonathan, and a stepson Trevor.  He likes to spend his free time with his family and also enjoys reading and gardening.  Dr. Tozzi said, ”I am very excited to be joining the VCU staff and look forward to serving the community which has been my home since 1999.”

Dr. Tozzi is currently working at CMH Surgical Services located at 416 Durant Street in South Hill.  He is currently accepting new patients; to schedule an appointment call (434) 774-2581.

Dr. Tozzi joins Dr. Desiderio Rimon, Dr. Jose DeMoya and Dr. Yi Wei Zhang, all General Surgeons at CMH Surgical Services.  To view a full list of services visit:  cmhsurgicalservices.org

Pleasant Hill Christian Church Annual Homecoming Service Sunday

GASBURG ~ Beginning Sunday, July 23, the Pleasant Hill Christian Church located at 175 Ankum Road in Gasburg, Virginia will hold its Annual Homecoming and Revival services.  The special Homecoming Day service will begin at 9:00 a.m. with Bible School for all ages followed by a special Homecoming worship service at 10:00 a.m.  Following the worship service on Sunday, food and fellowship will be shared at a luncheon in the PHCC Family Life Center.  Revival services will continue nightly, July 23-27, Sunday-Thursday at 7:30 p.m. After the Thursday evening worship service, everyone is invited to gather in the Family Life Center for ice cream and fellowship in conclusion of this special Revival event.

The Guest Evangelist for these services will be Creighton Beatty, minister of the Draper Christian Church in Eden, North Carolina. Creighton was raised near Savannah, Georgia in a little town called Pooler. After he graduated from Roanoke Bible College (now Mid-Atlantic Christian University) in Elizabeth City, NC, he was ordained into the ministry in 1979. Creighton has ministered in Covington Virginia, Salisbury Maryland, Martinsville Virginia, West Jefferson North Carolina, and Burlington North Carolina prior to ministering at Draper Christian Church.

Creighton is married to Debbie and they have two sons. Creighton enjoys preaching, teaching in homes, as well as just having fun with God’s people. Creighton also enjoys bicycling. His wife Debbie loves baking delicious deserts and using Creighton as a guinea pig for new dishes. Creighton looks forward to sharing Christ, helping people grow in their faith, leading Christians who have fallen away from their spiritual walk by showing them a way back to the Lord, and helping others realize that God wants them in His kingdom.

You will be enriched and enlightened by Creighton’s messages from God’s Word.  There will also be some outstanding special music brought to us each evening by a variety of singers and musicians including The Bowman Family, The Harris Family, Rick Ragan and more, from 7:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. prior to the service and also just prior to the messages.

The ministers, Greg Hand and Rob Tromm, and the members of Pleasant Hill Christian Church cordially invite everyone to attend.  If you have any questions, please call the church office at 434.577.2463.

Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center Announces June Employee of the Month

Emporia, VA – Tammy Green has been named the Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center (SVRMC) Employee of the Month for June 2017. Ms. Green, who works in SVRMC’s Cardiopulmonary Services Department, has been employed at SVRMC since October 2004.

Each month employees are nominated for demonstrating excellence in one of ten Standards of Behavior; the highlighted Standard of the Month for June was Responsiveness.  Ms. Green’s nomination included the following statement:  “Tammy is being nominated for the June Employee of the Month because of her keen responsiveness to our patients and their wellbeing.   Most notably, there was a recent event involving a patient, where Tammy’s proactive approach and responsiveness to his condition led to a change in his treatment plan and ultimately saved his life.  Tammy is a great ambassador for our hospital.  She is always smiling and brightening the day of our patients, physicians, and staff. She is a valued member of our team.”

As SVRMC’s June Employee of the Month, Ms. Green received a certificate of recognition, balloons, cookies to share with her co-workers, a cash award, and a chance to be selected as SVRMC’s 2017 Employee of the Year.

Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services Elects New Officers

Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services is proud to announce the election of new officers.

Anne Gordon Greever was elected Chair. Greever retired as a senior counsel from the law firm of Hunton & Williams where she specialized in labor, employment and civil rights laws and had been the chair of its investment committee for ten years. Greever received under undergraduate degree from Mary Washington University and her law degree from the College of William and Mary. In 2006, she was named to the Legal Elite by Virginia Business Magazine. Greever has served on the board and Vice Chair of the Richmond Economic Development Authority. She is also a past Chair of the Virginia Bar Association’s Labor and Employment Law Section. Greever first joined the Board of Trustees of Jackson-Feild Homes in 2002.

 

 

Elizabeth Feild was elected Vice-Chair. Head of global Management and Professional Development for PAREXEL, Feild has more than 18 years of experience with large scale leadership development.  She holds an undergraduate degree from North Carolina State University, a masters from American University, and certificates in leadership development and business coaching from Harvard and Duke. As the great-granddaughter of Mr. & Mrs. George W. Feild – donors of “Walnut Grove” – JFBHS holds a very special place in Feild’s heart.  Prior to job relocations to England and then Massachusetts, Feild served on the Jackson-Feild board of trustees.  Now that she and her family are back in North Carolina, Feild is thrilled to once again be actively involved in continuing the mission of JFBHS..

 

T. Darnley Adamson, III was re-elected as Secretary of the Board. Adamson has many years of experience in both the insurance and real estate fields and currently owns and operates Green Solutions, LLC, with his son. Adamson attended Hampden-Sydney College, and is active in charitable and conservation causes.

 

 

 

 

 

Craig A. Tilley was re-elected as Treasurer of the Board. Tilley has had an extensive career in the finance field working for major banks and corporations in Richmond and is currently a Director of Credit at Owens & Minor. He is a graduate of the University of North Carolina where he received his degree in economics.  

Grants Enable Workforce Training at SVCC

RICHMOND – Governor Terry McAuliffe announced recently that, through the New Economy Workforce Credentials Grant program, Virginia’s Community Colleges provided workforce training that enabled 2,173 Virginians to secure industry-recognized credentials, licenses, and certifications needed for high-demand careers, in the first year of the grant program.

This milestone nearly triples the number of people who were credentialed last year, bringing the total to 4,268 Virginians.  More than half of the credential earners, 2,173, took advantage of the New Economy Workforce Credentials Grant program. Training for the remaining 2,095 credentials was funded by employers, federal grants, or other private sources. 

Nate Humphrey of Amelia Court House enrolled in the power line worker program at Southside Virginia Community College.

The retired U.S. Army Ranger served seven combat deployments in Afghanistan and Iraq. When he came home, he was looking for that same camaraderie.

“When I retired, I missed it,” he said. “And I found it being a lineman.”

Just days after completing the program, he locked down a job at Southside Electric Cooperative.

“I think the course was just at $11,000, but with the grant, I didn’t pay anything,” he said. “The only thing I paid for was my boots and my belt.”

The Workforce Credential Grant Program is now in its second year. Right now, grants are available to support 146 training courses offered at 23 community colleges in the commonwealth.  At SVCC, the grant can cover the following programs for eligible students:  Welding, Power Line Worker Training, Truck Driver Training, Nurse Aide, Massage Therapy, Phlebotomy, Medication Aide and Precision Machining.

See class offerings and register at southside.augusoft.net

Senior leader remembers lessons of humble beginnings Lt. Gen. Larry Wyche retires July 21

Lt. Gen. Larry Wyche, deputy commander for the Army Materiel Command, will soon be packing the mementos in his office as he prepares for retirement. His retirement ceremony is set for July 21 at 9 a.m. on the AMC Parade Field at Redstone Arsenal, Ala. (Photo by Sgt. First Class Teddy Wade)

By KARI HAWKINS

Army Materiel Command Public Affairs

Under the collar of his three-star uniform, Lt. Gen. Larry Wyche wears a symbol of his early years of service that has kept him connected to the challenges and aspirations of the Army’s enlisted ranks.

That symbol – the rank of a sergeant – is important to an officer who has focused on being accessible, fair and supportive to the Soldiers and Department of the Army civilians who have worked beside him and for him.

“For me, the Golden Rule is to treat people like you want to be treated,” said Wyche, deputy commander of the Army Materiel Command and senior commander for Redstone Arsenal. “I’ve always tried to be very balanced in my life, and to be approachable. Balance is very important, in my opinion, because in this business things get thrown at your left and right, and top and bottom, and you have to continue to make sound decisions.”

Wyche’s personal/professional life balance will soon tip more to the personal side as he prepares for retirement, closing a career that has spanned more than four decades and included four years as an enlisted Soldier. His retirement ceremony is set for July 21 at 9 a.m. on the AMC Parade Field.

Wyche has been a part of the AMC enterprise for years; in some capacity, he reported to the past four of its commanders – Gen. Benjamin Griffin while commander of the Joint Munitions Command; Gen. Ann Dunwoody while AMC’s deputy chief of staff, 3/4; and Gen. Dennis Via and Gen. Gus Perna while AMC deputy commander. In his current role, he not only assists in the AMC worldwide mission, but leads the Army’s Conventional Ammunition and Explosives Safety programs, Depot Maintenance Corporate Board, and AMC’s Cyber Assurance and Enterprise Resource Planning programs.

“All four of the commanders I’ve worked for have been exceptional,” Wyche said. “But each approached things differently and had a different focus, and I’ve adapted to that. As AMC’s deputy commander, I’m responsible for overseeing the day-to-day operations of a multi-billion dollar enterprise and to fill in the gaps and the seams for both previous commander Gen. Via and now Gen. Perna.”

In addition to his duties as AMC’s deputy commander, Wyche serves as the senior commander for Redstone Arsenal, a Federal Center of Excellence with more than 70 tenant organizations and a nearly 40,000-strong workforce.

“While it is very time consuming, at the same time, it’s very rewarding to work with a community that really cares about Redstone Arsenal.”

When not representing Redstone, Wyche is likely traveling to visit Corps and Division Commanders, as well as to AMC depots or industrial plants.

“We cannot forget the business we’re in – the warfighting business. That’s what we live for – to ensure our Soldiers have what they need to fight and win,” Wyche said. “Our AMC units that support formations are a major part of the fight. Understanding the needs and connecting the dots from operational units to the Organic Industrial Base is critical.”

Born in North Carolina and raised on a tobacco farm in Virginia, Wyche enlisted in the Army in 1975. He served as a cavalry scout, reaching the rank of sergeant.

“Every assignment I ever had taught me something about myself and the Army,” Wyche said. “I would not replace my time as a young cavalry scout for any assignment. I was in the fox hole; I dug fox holes. I carried a M60, and I humped hills with teammates. That was special to me.”

Wyche left active duty to attend Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, during which he commanded a detachment as a Reserve officer while also being active with the Army ROTC program. He was commissioned as a Quartermaster officer in 1982.

“My operational assignments in command at places like Fort Hood and Fort Bragg put me out there in the dirt learning how to lead Soldiers,” Wyche said. “Then my introduction to the industrial side of the Army was as the commander of the Joint Munitions Command, where they make everything from 9 mm rounds to 21,600 thousand-pound bombs, and have 16,000 employees around the nation at 18 ammunition plants and sites. That taught me the business of the Army and gave me an understanding of industrial operations.”

Other assignments – commander of the Combined Arms Support Command and the Sustainment Center at Fort Lee, Virginia.; commander of the Joint Logistics Command, Combined Task Force 76 in Afghanistan; and leadership roles in the offices of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Programs and Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics at the Pentagon – provided experiences that gave Wyche a well-rounded understanding of Army strategic operations.

In the wake of budget tightening measures, Wyche said the challenge is to continue to ensure readiness while also finding ways to be more efficient and effective. During his time at AMC, Wyche has focused on ensuring the right funding, infrastructure, personnel and capabilities are in place to support Soldier equipment readiness.

As a career logistician, Wyche has lived the meaning behind the warfighter logistician’s mantra: “We are prepared to give the shirts off our backs and boots off our feet to support the fight. We will never say ‘no’ as long as there is one gallon of gas to give or one bullet to give.”

“It is about selfless service. We, logisticians and sustainers, must do whatever it takes to support the Warfighters and Soldiers,” he said.

Early in his Army career, a negative comment from a senior Soldier became the motivation for Wyche to excel. Yet, 15 years into his career, he began questioning his purpose in the Army.

“I realized that my purpose was to serve the people and the organizations that I serve with. My passion to be of service motivated me to wear this uniform,” he said. “I come to work with a smile on my face because I love what I do. It’s been said that ‘Soldiering is an affair of the heart.’ You’ve got to want to do it.”

Leadership, too, is an affair of the heart, and success requires a true commitment to the concepts of leadership.

“As their leader, employees and Soldiers have to know you care and that you are competent to lead,” Wyche said. “They have to have confidence and trust in you. They have to be able to say, ‘That’s my boss and I trust him.’ Leaders must set a good example, and they have to care not only for their employees but also for their families.”

Looking back on his service, Wyche said it is his family, and especially his wife, Denise, who had a 30-year career as a DA civilian, who he credits for his career’s success. Of all he’s accomplished, he is most proud of being able to make a difference in the lives of Soldiers and DA civilians.

“Watching the growth in the people who I have served with has been truly rewarding for me,” he said. “It has been truly an honor to wear this uniform and serve our Army and country.”

Inset Photo: Lt. Gen. Larry Wyche in the early days of his Army career. The general first enlisted in 1975 as a cavalry scout and then attended Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, where he commissioned as a Quartermaster officer in 1982.

Assessing the Value of Education

By Dr. Al Roberts

Every year as the summer turns its focus toward the coming of autumn, back-to-school stories tend to proliferate in national and local media. One recurring theme seems to be the rising cost of college tuition and questions about its value and payback.

To be sure, college costs have risen, and they continue to rise. The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, a nonpartisan research and policy institute, released a report last year that documented the ways in which recession-related budgetary concerns led to cuts in the support of higher education. In 46 states, including Virginia, government spending per student continues to remain less than what it was prior to the beginning of the recession in 2008. In fact, based on inflation-adjusted dollars, funding for higher education in Virginia is now 22.5 percent less per student. Such reductions in support are one of the factors that contribute to rising tuition. In this fiscal climate, evaluating the return on investments in higher education seems fitting.

Some benefits fall outside the realm of dollars. College graduates tend to be healthier, more engaged in their communities, and better able to understand diverse points of view. In most assessments, however, the question of value revolves around expenditures and paybacks.

In Virginia, community colleges offer a lower-cost, value-based choice. According to information from the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV), tuition and mandatory fees for full-time, in-state undergraduates in Commonwealth’s four-year colleges averages $12,137. With fees of $9,989 for room and board, that yields a grand total of $22,126 per academic year. By comparison, here at Southside Virginia Community College in-state tuition and fees add up to $4,582.50 for 15 credit hours per semester for the entire 2017-18 academic year. Furthermore, 94 percent of beginning undergraduate students receive significant financial aid packages.

But what’s the payback?

College Measures, an initiative of the American Institutes for Research, studied that question. They found that students who graduate from a community college with an Associate’s degree in an occupational or technical field earn an average of $35,718 in the first year after graduation and $41,879 eight years after graduation. At VA.EdPays.org on-line you can download the entire report or interactively explore the data to learn more details about wage variations by field of study and region.  Additionally, students who earn an Associate’s degree in a transfer program can save approximately $35,000 on the cost of obtaining a Bachelor’s degree. They also have an opportunity to establish their academic competitiveness and get a clearer picture of their overall career goals.

For more information about your higher education choices and opportunities, contact SVCC at 434-949-1000. Our team of academic and workforce advisors can help you get the most value from your education dollars.

Dr. Al Roberts is president of Southside Virginia Community College, an institution of higher learning that provides a wide variety of education opportunities to a diverse student population within a service area that spans ten counties and the city of Emporia. He can be reached via email at al.roberts@southside.edu.

Be Amazed at the Library

On Thursday, July 20th, join us at the Meherrin Regional Library System as Steve the Amazing Teacher teaches us about the magic of books through science and storytelling. You can even learn to build your own magic trick! The program will be held at 10:30 AM at the Brunswick County Library, Lawrenceville, and at 2:00 PM at the Richardson Memorial Library, Emporia.

Events begin promptly and seating is limited to a first come basis. For more information contact the Brunswick County Library at 434-848-2418, ext. 301, the Richardson Memorial Library at 434-634-2539, or visit www.meherrinlib.org.

Monday Morning Movies at the Library continue July 24th with Rock Dog. This movie is rated PG and is 129 minutes long. The movie will be shown at 10:30 AM at both the Brunswick County Library and the Richardson Memorial Library. Snacks are welcomed. Children under the age of 10 must be supervised.

Nursing Is Here

At eighteen years old, Na’Shiyaa Robertson might look like your average high school student: active, happy and working hard to balance studies and social life. Beneath the composed exterior however is a highly motivated young woman who is completing the SVCC Nurse Aide program in addition to completing her high school studies at Randolph Henry High School.

Redefining the term ‘multitasking’ SVCC’s dual enrollment program allows Shiyaa to attend nursing classes at the Southside Virginia Community College’s Keysville campus while still in high school. In May, Shiyaa crossed her graduation stage with not only a diploma, but poised to take the state boards to become a Certified Nurses Aide and jumpstart her nursing career.

Shiyaa says she has always felt drawn to the field of nursing, enjoying connecting with and helping others. Shiyaa and her family were deeply affected after losing an uncle to liver disease. Although Shiyaa was very young when her uncle passed, his illness impacted her close knit family profoundly. With multiple aunts already working as RN’s at area hospitals, for Shiyaa, nursing was a natural and fulfilling fit. Once finishing high school, the CNA program and passing her state boards, Shiyaa will follow in the family footsteps to pursue an associate degree in nursing.

“The most incredible part of being a nurse, for me,” says Shiyaa, “is being able to help people do things they’re no longer able to do.”  

Visit nursingishere.com for more information.

Judy Wrenn Daughtrey

Judy Wrenn Daughtrey, 70, of Brink, VA, passed away on July 10, 2017 after a brief illness. She was predeceased by her parents, Percy and Ida Wrenn. She is survived by her husband, F. Jerry Daughtrey; daughter, Sandy Webb and husband David; sisters, Linda Smith and husband Ashley, and Nancy Powell; grandchildren, Lauren Ashley Collins and Dylan Allen; special nieces and nephew, Penny Powell, Kenny Powell, Shay Smith and Angel Allen; many great-nieces and great-nephews and her beloved dog, Smokey. A graduate of Greensville County High School, Mrs. Daughtrey was a life-long employee of the banking industry in Emporia, working as both a loan officer and a branch manager. A memorial service will be held on Thursday, July 13, at 2 p.m., at Fountain Creek Baptist Church. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Greensville Volunteer Rescue Squad or Greensville County Fire Department.

VCU Health CMH to Host Free Breast Health Workshops

VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital in South Hill will be hosting FREE Breast Health Educational Work Shops throughout the region in July and August.    VCU Health CMH wants to empower women to take control of their health by educating them about their body and providing important breast cancer resources.  Participants will learn about breast health education and breast cancer awareness, intervention and early detection, who is at risk for breast cancer and how often and when to have a mammogram.   Blood pressure and cholesterol checks will also be offered.  Women of all ages are invited to join us at any of these locations and times:

July 19

10am to 12noon

Crewe Public Library

414 Tyler St.

Crewe, VA

July 26

11am to 1pm

R.T. Arnold Public Library

110 E. Danville St.

South Hill, VA

Aug 2

10am to 12noon

Brunswick County Public Library

133 W. Hicks St.

Lawrenceville, VA

Aug 9

10am to 12:30pm

Clarksville Public Library

914 Virginia Ave.

Clarksville, VA

Aug 16

10am to 12:30pm

Warren County Memorial  Library

119 S. Front St.

Warrenton, NC

 

These workshops are funded through a grant from Susan G. Komen for the Cure Richmond Affiliate and in collaboration with VCU Massey Cancer Center's Health Information & Advocacy @ Your Library.  For more information, call VCU Health CMH Health & Wellness at (434) 447-3151, Ext. 3901.

Meherrin-Powellton Elementary School Visits SVCC and Uses STEM Skills

The Christanna Campus of Southside Virginia Community College hosted approximately 50 students from Meherrrin-Powellton Elementary School the week of June 26-30, 2017.  Students utilized their STEM(Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) skills to construct and race air propelled cars, construct a device to make a soft landing with fragile equipment, and develop green engineering projects.  Additional challenges included building an air hockey table from a simple cardboard box and building Wiggle Bots.  Students also tested their individual skills by completing daily Minute To Win It Challenges.  

Advanced Manufacturing Summer Camp

Several local youth participated in the first Advanced Manufacturing Summer Camp at Southside Virginia Community College’s Southside Virginia Education Center located in Emporia, VA. The youth had the opportunity to learn about three manufacturing companies (Boar's Head Provision of Jarratt, VA; Toll Brothers of Emporia, VA; and Georgia Pacific of Emporia, VA). The youth also participated in hands on learning in blueprint reading, 3D design, programming for CNC machines, and use of manual mill and lathe machines. The content covered in this camp is also available through SVCC’s dual enrollment programs for computer aided drafting, precision machining and high performance technology. For more information about dual enrollment opportunities, please contact 434-949-1077.

(Left to Right) Anthony Houston, Boar's Head Facilities Manager, Vincent Brown, Camp Instructor and SVCC Professor, Vondrenna Smithers, Camp Director and Advanced Manufacturing Coach, Jackie Hill, Malana Hill, Solomon Hill, Antoine Price, Jr., Christiyanna Terry, Zander Broadbent, Jacques Anderson, Jakob Fillhart, Alex Price, Chris Scott, Boar's Head Electricity Supervisor, Spencer Fillhart, and Lewis Dickens, Boar's Head Refrigeration Supervisor. 

WORK ETHIC LEADS TO COOL JOB

James Branch’s cool job is so cool, he has no plans to quit working until he cannot work anymore.   His cool job is as a mechanic maintaining fire and rescue vehicles for the city of Hopewell, Virginia.

His work ethic and determination have served him well since he dropped out of high school at 16.  Sitting in a classroom environment, listening was not his style of learning.  When he quit school, he was required to pursue a vocational trade and chose the automotive program.

Unable to find work in that profession in his native Lunenburg County, he became an accomplished carpenter and made his living in this arena for 30 years.  When the housing industry and economy turned sour, Branch realized he needed a GED to land a better job.  

At age 50, he completed his GED in six months and secured a job with the city of Petersburg, at first pouring concrete and later in the auto shop.  

When Branch wanted to receive his State Inspection License, the closest school to his current home in Sussex County was the John H. Daniel Campus of Southside Virginia Community College that offered night classes.

After completing the Inspection course, the instructor, Arnold Gayles talked him into continuing.  He received a certificate in Auto Technology in 2014 and then decided that he wanted to continue to an Associate’s Degree.  For four years he drove 81 miles,one way, which equaled 3 ½ to 4 hours on the road and 5 hours in class after working 8 hours in Petersburg. 

“The support and friendship of his instructor Gayles,helped me keep working towards my goal,” he said.  

He graduated Magna Cum Laude in 2016 with an Associate's Degree in Technical Studies.  He is also a member of Phi Theta Kappa honor society.

Branch is very grateful for the knowledge and support that he received from SVCC especially his counselor, Matt Dunn.  Branch now has a good salary and state benefits and a new career.

No stranger to hard work, Branch continues to work on family cars, dabble in carpentry, raise a garden and he and his wife are parents to four daughters.  

He would like for students to remember that “You are never too old to learn”.  

He is planning to keep up with changing technology and the changing workforce.  He can see that he needs to strive to be a “Life Long Learner,” but is seems he has met that goal!

July is Vehicle Theft Prevention Month

The Virginia State Police Help Eliminate Auto Theft program reminds motorists that unsecured vehicles are easy targets

RICHMOND, Va.— Summertime is prime time for auto theft, which is why the Virginia State Police Help Eliminate Auto Theft (HEAT) program is reminding motorists to secure their unattended vehicles.

Of the 9,575 motor vehicle theft offenses in 2016, 3,523 occurred between June and September. For the calendar year, August had the dubious distinction of leading all months with 957 auto theft offenses. July had the second-most offenses with 924. A total of 9,719 motor vehicles were reported stolen in 2016.

First Sgt. Steve Hall, Virginia State Police Help Eliminate Auto Theft (HEAT) program coordinator, said many auto thefts could be avoided if motorists would simply take their keys. Statistics show that nearly one in four vehicles stolen in Virginia have the keys inside.

“That’s a problem,” Hall said. “In addition to taking your keys when you leave your vehicle, don’t leave spare keys in the glove box or elsewhere on the vehicle. Always lock the doors and always close the windows. At night, choose parking spots that are in well-lit and high-traffic areas if you can.”

Drivers should develop good habits and avoid complacency, Hall said, because auto thieves can take a vehicle in just a matter of moments.

“A lot of people think, ‘I’ll only be in the store for a minute, so I’ll just leave the car running,’ ” he said. “Don’t do it. It takes very little time for someone in that situation to jump into your car and drive off.”

Want to beat the summer heat without leaving your vehicle completely vulnerable? Try parking in a garage or shaded area when possible. If no shade is available when parking, block direct sunlight by putting a visor in your windshield or drape a blanket or towel over the dashboard and steering wheel.

“Or give yourself a few extra minutes before your departure so you can stay with your vehicle while you run your air conditioner,” Hall said. “Any of these is a better alternative to potentially having your car stolen.”

Follow HEAT on Facebook (@HEATreward) for summer giveaways and auto theft prevention tips. Upcoming HEAT appearances include a display at AAA’s Summer Car Care Event in Henrico on July 29, and Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) etchings on July 15 (Roanoke); July 29 (Martinsville and Midlothian). Learn more about the HEAT program and VIN-etching events at HEATreward.com.    

Dominion Energy Moving Forward on Offshore Wind Project with Global Market Leader DONG Energy as Partner

DONG Energy of Denmark to construct 12 megawatts of offshore wind energy

Builds on Dominion Energy’s strong commitment, investment in clean renewable energy

Site located 27 miles off the coast of Virginia Beach

RICHMOND, Va. – As part of its ongoing commitment to bring cleaner energy to its customers, Dominion Energy Virginia is moving forward on the mid-Atlantic’s first offshore wind project in a federal lease area.  It has signed an agreement and strategic partnership with DONG Energy of Denmark, a global leader in offshore wind development, to build two 6-megawatt turbines off the coast of Virginia Beach. The two companies will now begin refining agreements for engineering, procurement and construction. Dominion Energy remains the sole owner of the project.

Engineering and development work on the newly named Coastal Virginia Offshore Wind project is expected to begin immediately by DONG Energy to support the targeted installation by the end of 2020. The timing for construction depends on many factors such as weather and protected species migration patterns.  

The project is an important first step toward offshore wind development for Virginia and the United States. It would be only the second offshore wind project in the nation and the first owned by an electric utility company. Along with clean energy, it will provide Dominion Energy with valuable experience in managing offshore wind resources.

“Virginia is now positioned to be a leader in developing more renewable energy thanks to the Commonwealth’s committed leadership and DONG’s unrivaled expertise in building offshore wind farms,” said Thomas F. Farrell, II, Dominion Energy’s chairman, president and chief executive officer. “While we have faced many technological challenges and even more doubters as we advanced this project, we have been steadfast in our commitment to our customers and the communities we serve.”

“Today marks the first step in what I expect to be the deployment of hundreds of wind turbines off Virginia’s coast that will further diversify our energy production portfolio, create thousands of jobs, and reduce carbon emissions in the Commonwealth,” said Gov. Terry McAuliffe. “Hampton Roads has the ideal port assets and talented workforce to attract and house the offshore wind business supply chain to support not only Virginia’s commercial wind area, but also wind farms under development in Massachusetts, New York, and Maryland. Today's announcement advances our efforts to build a new Virginia economy that is cleaner, stronger, and more diverse.”

“DONG Energy is the energy supplier in Europe that has come the farthest in the transition to renewable energy, and we are excited to bring our expertise to America,” said Samuel Leupold, executive vice president and CEO of Wind Power atDONG Energy. “This project will provide us vital experience in constructing an offshore wind project in the United States and serve as a stepping stone to a larger commercial-scale partnership between our companies in the future. We see the tremendous potential in the Mid-Atlantic for emission-free, renewable wind generation and we are excited to help the Commonwealth in reaping the benefits of wind power.”

This phase one development of two wind turbines will be built approximately 27 miles off the coast of Virginia Beach on a 2,135-acre site leased by the Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy.  The project opens the door to long-term commercial wind development. It will provide critical operational, weather and environmental experience needed for large-scale development in the adjacent 112,800-acre site leased by Dominion Energy from the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM). Full deployment could generate up to 2,000 megawatts of energy – enough to power half a million homes.

The two companies have signed a memorandum of understanding which gives DONG Energy exclusive rights to discuss a strategic partnership with Dominion Energy about developing the commercial site based on successful deployment of the initial test turbines. 

DONG Energy, based in Denmark with North American headquarters in Boston, owns 22 offshore wind farms in Europe and Asia. DONG Energy brings to the project significant experience in engineering, manufacturing, construction and supply chain management.

The project continues what previously was called the Virginia Offshore Wind Technology Assessment Project (VOWTAP). Dominion Energy began work on the project in 2011 as part of a Department of Energy grant to develop and test new wind technologies that could lower the cost and withstand hurricanes. During that time key achievements were made to advance the project including: Approval of the Research Activities Plan by BOEM and environmental studies, which included avian and bat surveys, as well as assessments of ocean currents, archeological conditions, and whale migration patterns.

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