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March 2019

GREENSVILLE/EMPORIA DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES

LOCAL BOARD MEETING

The Greensville/Emporia Department of Social Services Administrative Board will hold its regular meeting Thursday, July 18, 2019, at 3:30 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Greensville/Emporia Department of Social Services located at 1748 East Atlantic Street.

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Kinston Jordan

Services

Saturday, March 30, 2019, 3:00 PM

Rising Star Baptist Church
3931 Brandy Creek Road
Emporia, VA 23847

Mr. Kinston Jordan, 82, of Emporia, Virginia, departed this earthly life on Monday, March 25, 2019, at Johnston Willis Hospital, Richmond, Virginia.

Kinston was born on Sunday, March 14, 1937, in Greensville County, Virginia, to the parentage of the late Howard Jordan and Florence Rebecca Harris Jordan.

Survivors include:  his wife, Jacqueline Jordan of the home, four children, Priscilla Parker and Charlene Anderton both of Petersburg, Virginia, Kendra Jordan of Las Angeles, California and Willie D. House of Emporia, Virginia; three grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; his siblings, Dorothy Matthews of New Jersey, Louise Cummings (Leon) of South Carolina, Ernie 'Susie' Bullock  and Roger Jordan (Barbara) both of Emporia, Virginia, Christine McNeil (Lardell) of Pennsylvania and Shirley Worrell of Georgia; a host of other relatives and friends. 

Rev. James H and Ann Alsop

The interment of Rev. James H Alsop and his wife Ann Alsop will be held at the cemetery of Zion Baptist Church in Skippers VA on April 6, 2019 at 2:00 p.m. Rev. Alsop passed on July 21, 2009 and Ann passed on February 7, 2019.

Zion was the Alsop's first full time church.

Larry Grizzard will be doing a memorial service and the family welcomes anyone who would like to attend.

2019 Academy Day is April 27

Senator Mark Warner invites high school and middle school students, their parents, and school counselors to Academy Day 2019. Attendees will be provided a comprehensive overview of the United States service academies and their admission processes. In addition, students will be able to meet with officials from all five academies as well as representatives from ROTC programs, Mary Baldwin University, Randolph Macon Academy, Virginia Tech, and Virginia Military Institute.

Representatives from Virginia Congressional offices will be available to answer questions regarding the application procedures for congressional nominations.

This event will be held on April 27th, 2019 Time: 10:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. Doors open at 9:30 a.m. Program begins at 10:00 a.m. Location: The Paramount Theater 215 East Main Street Charlottesville, VA 22902 To register for Academy Day 2019, please visit https://academyday2019.eventbrite.com. If you have any questions about the event, please email academy_noms@warner.senate.gov or call 540-857-2676.

Gov. Northam Vetoes Bill Creating ‘School Protection Officers’

Governor Signs Bill Requiring Clergy to Report Child Abuse

Governor’s Amendment Would Ban Using a Phone While Driving

ATTORNEY GENERAL HERRING CONTINUES TO DEFEND THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT IN COURT

RICHMOND (March 25, 2019) – Attorney General Mark R. Herring today joined a coalition of 21 attorneys general in filing an opening brief in Texas v. U.S., defending the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the healthcare of tens of millions of Americans. Today’s brief, filed in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, argues that every provision of the ACA remains valid. It also details the harm that declaring the ACA invalid would have on the tens of millions of people who rely on it for access to high-quality, affordable healthcare, as well as the broader damage that it would do to the nation’s healthcare system. In June, Attorney General Herring intervened to defend against the suit, leaving him and his colleagues to defend Americans’ healthcare after President Trump switched sides and joined with Republican state attorneys general in trying to strike down the law.

“This politically motivated lawsuit is dangerous, reckless and risks the health of Americans,” said Attorney General Herring. “Millions of Virginians rely on the Affordable Care Act for quality, affordable healthcare and when the Trump Administration refused to defend the ACA in court I knew I had to step in. I will continue to join my colleagues in fighting to make sure that healthcare is not ripped away from Americans.” 

The plaintiffs, two individuals and 18 States led by Texas, filed this lawsuit in February 2018, challenging one provision of the Affordable Care Act—the requirement that individuals maintain health insurance or pay a tax. Texas’ lawsuit came after Congress reduced that tax to zero dollars December 2017. Opponents of the ACA had attempted and failed to repeal the ACA over 70 times since its instatement. The plaintiffs argued that this change made the minimum coverage provision unconstitutional. They further argued that the rest of the ACA could not be “severed” from that one provision, so the entire Act must be struck down.

On December 14, 2018, Judge Reed O’Connor of the Northern District of Texas issued his decision agreeing with the plaintiffs. In response, Attorney General Herring and his colleagues filed a motion to stay the effect of that decision and to expedite resolution of this case. The District Court granted that motion on December 30, 2018. On January 3, 2019, Attorney General Herring and his colleagues continued their legal defense in the ACA and formally filed a notice of appeal, challenging the District Court’s December 14 opinion in the Fifth Circuit.

Today’s filing continues the legal defense of the ACA. In their brief, the attorneys general argue that the plaintiffs do not have standing to challenge the minimum coverage provision, because the individual plaintiffs are not injured by a provision that now offers a lawful choice between buying insurance and paying a zero-dollar tax. The attorneys general further argue that the state plaintiffs also lack standing, because there is no evidence that the amended provision will require them to spend more money. Lastly, the District Court wrongly concluded that the minimum coverage provision was unconstitutional, and even if it were there would be no legal basis for also declaring the rest of the ACA invalid—including its provisions expanding Medicaid, reforming Medicare, and providing protections to individuals with preexisting health conditions.

The brief also highlights the consequences of upholding the district court’s decision, which would wreak havoc on the entire American healthcare system and risk lives in every state. If affirmed, the district court’s decision would affect nearly every American, including:

  • 133 million Americans, including 17 million kids, with preexisting health conditions;

  • Young adults under 26 years of age, who are covered under a parent’s health plan;

  • More than 12 million Americans who received coverage through Medicaid expansion;

  • 12 million seniors who receive a Medicare benefit to afford prescription drugs; and

  • Working families who rely on tax credits and employer-sponsored plans to afford insurance.

If successful, Texas’ lawsuit would harm Virginia by:

  • Halting Medicaid expansion, which was signed into law in Virginia last year, with the goal of covering an additional 400,000 Virginians;

  • Allowing insurance companies to deny coverage to people with pre-existing conditions or charge them more;

  • Allowing insurance companies to discriminate against women by charging them higher premiums;

  • Taking away seniors’ prescription drug discounts;

  • Ending $1.15 billion in tax credits that helped 335,000 Virginians afford insurance in 2017 alone;

  • Ending the healthcare exchange where more than 410,000 Virginians purchased their healthcare in 2017;

  • Stripping funding from our nation’s public health system, including work to combat the opioid epidemic; and

  • Ending billions in federal aid for healthcare, including $458 million in FY 2019 and $1.9 billion in FY 2020.

VSP Seeking Those who Stopped at Gloucester Fatal Crash - Please Call VSP

As the investigation continues into the fatal traffic crash that occurred Monday afternoon in Gloucester County, the Virginia State Police is asking for those motorists who stopped out at the crash scene to please contact the investigating trooper as soon as possible. Trooper James Street can be reached at 804-832-6368. 

The single-vehicle crash occurred at approximately 2:35 p.m. in the eastbound lanes of Route 14 (John Clayton Memorial Highway), just east of Route 17( George Washington Memorial Highway).

A 1998 Ford Explorer was traveling east on Route 14 when it ran off the road and over-corrected. The SUV then overturned several times and ejected the passenger, who was not wearing a seat belt.

The passenger, Tremayne Ryeshawn Safewright,26, of Newport News., Va., was flown to Riverside Regional Medical Center. He later succumbed to his injuries sustained in the crash.

The driver, Jiree Dequayne Burrell, 24, of Gloucester, Va., was transported to a nearby hospital for treatment of serious injuries.

Preliminary investigations reveal that speed and alcohol, were contributing factors. 

The Gloucester Country Commonwealth's Attorney was notified of the fatality. Charges are still pending at this time.

Skill-based Slot Machines Put Vegas at the Corner Bar

Yolanda Talley, VCU Health CMH February Team Member of the Month

Vice President of Professional Services, Todd Howell; Chief Executive Officer, W. Scott Burnette; Phlebotomist, Yolanda Talley; and Director of Laboratory Services, Christina Duke (L to R).

When you walk around thinking that a smile makes a day, good things tend to follow. The February VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital team member of the month is living proof.

Yolanda Talley, a phlebotomist with the CMH Lab, has earned repeated high praise from patients and staff she interacts with, according to Christina Duke, manager of the lab.

“Employees like Yolanda are why people choose CMH.” Christina said. “Yolanda has received 12 outpatient compliments in the past two months.  They even state she sometimes helps them to their cars!”

One such compliment earned Yolanda the first-ever team member of the month award for a lab employee.

According to Christina, the patient said, “Yolanda was wonderful. She was so polite and I didn’t have to wait.”

Yolanda has been with CMH for the past four and half years and works throughout CMH collecting blood samples from patients.

“I love my job,” she said. “I get to meet new people all the time and see different faces. I get to do the hard job (drawing blood).”

Yolanda works with patients in the emergency department, ICU, PACU, Acute Care, and in the Hundley Center.

It’s her fantastic attitude that Christina loves. “I tell all my staff that we are the face of the lab when we interact with patients and giving patients a great experience makes everyone’s day better.”

Yolanda is a giver. During her off time from work, she is the jayvee girls basketball coach at Park View High School, an assistant coach to the varsity team and an assistant track coach for the Dragons in the spring.

Yolanda has two children, Nyjay, her high school age daughter, and Elijan, a fourth grade. In her spare time from work, coaching and parenting, Yolanda is a movie junkie.

Other team members nominated in February were: Adelyn Beiler and Caitlin Crowder from Acute Care; Sean DeVaughn from Environmental Services; Amy Lynch from Care Management; Megan Mull from the Emergency Department; Joyce Paynter from Lab; and John Watson from Physical Therapy.

In addition to the award certificate, Yolanda received a STAR Service lapel pin, letter of commendation from Administration, a $40 gift certificate, and a parking place of her choice for the month.

 

Five Steps to Colon Health

An easy formula to promote prevention, awareness of common cancer

By: H. “Eddie” Akbari, MD, PhD, FACS     

Emporia, VA – Cancer of the colon is the third most common cancer in the United States – and, caught early, it’s also one of the most curable. About 90 percent of individuals whose cancer is found before it has spread survive five years after diagnosis. But, if not caught at this point, the five-year survival rate is just 10 percent. For residents in and around Emporia, colon cancer rates are even more alarming. According to a study in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, eastern Virginia and North Carolina are one of 3 hot spots for increased death from colon cancer.

Dr. Akbari discussing colon cancer prevention at a YMCA Lunch & Learn.

Dr. Akbari says there are five simple steps that you can take to protect your health.

1. Get tested - In 2018, the American Cancer Society (ACS) issued new screening guidelines for all adults over age 45 to begin routine colon cancer screenings.

Prevention is the primary goal and steer providers and patients toward those tests with the highest potential to prevent cancer. The recommendations include two tests and more specifically define the differences between tests: those that find cancer, and those that can find precancerous growths (also known as polyps). ACS recommends those tests that actually examine the interior of the colon because they cannot only detect cancer, but also prevent it by finding – and removing – polyps or growths that can potentially cause cancer. These tests include a flexible signoidoscopy (every five years); a colonoscopy (every 10 years); a double contrast barium enema (every five years); or a CT colonography or virtual colonoscopy (every five years). Polyps found during these tests can be removed on the spot, simply and painlessly.

Testing options that look for evidence of actual cancer, include three types of stool tests – an annual fecal occult blood test, the annual fecal immunochemical test (FIT), and a periodic stool DNA test.

2. Develop awareness

Know the risk factors associated with colon problems:

  • Advancing age: i.e., over age 45
  • A high-fat diet
  • A family (i.e., sibling or parent) or personal history of colorectal cancer
  • A history of polyps or growths inside the colon and rectum
  • Certain conditions that elevate your risk, such as Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis
  • Diabetes: People with diabetes have a 40 percent increased risk of colon cancer
  • Ethic background: African-Americans have the highest number of colorectal cancer cases in the United States

3. Know the symptoms

Be vigilant about scheduled screenings, and if you have certain symptoms, see your doctor sooner. Symptoms may include persistent stomach discomfort, a change in bowel habits (diarrhea, constipation, or a change in stool consistency), abdominal pain accompanying a bowel movement, dark stools, weakness or fatigue, unexplained weight loss, or blood in the stool. Symptoms vary, and certain foods or medications can also mimic these symptoms. It’s best to err on the safe side and check with your doctor about changes.

4. Practice prevention

A balanced diet, regular exercise and smart lifestyle choices will keep your risk level in check. A diet rich in fruits, vegetables and whole grains provides the nutrients and antioxidants that fight disease. Low-fat dairy products and limited consumption of red meat keep your saturated fat intake low. Getting your vitamins and minerals through a daily supplement helps, but food-based vitamins are more effective and more easily absorbed by the body. Regular exercise – at least 30 minutes most days of the week – helps build your body’s defenses. Finally, quitting smoking and limiting alcohol consumption help, too.

5. Know your options

Talk with your doctor about the best way to manage your risk. If you have an above-average risk for colon cancer or an initial test reveals polyps, you and your doctor can decide the course of action that works best for you. Talk with your doctor at Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center about the resources available to you and learn the best way to manage your risk.

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Assembly OKs Limited No-excuse Absentee Voting in 2020

Report Shows Geographic Disparities in Health in Virginia

Greensville Schools to host Child Find

Greensville County Public Schools will sponsor Child Find on Friday, April 12, 2019 from 10 am until 5 pm at Greensville Elementary School.

Child Find is registration for Head Start or Virginia Preschool Initiative.

Head Start is a federal preschool program which provides comprehensive services and learning experiences to prepare children for Kindergarten and move families toward self-sufficiency. The program also operates in compliance with IDEA to include children with special needs. All Head Start services are free to children and families.

The Virginia Preschool Initiative, established in 1995, distributes state funds to schools and community based organizations to provide quality preschool program for at-risk four-year-olds. The program offers full day Pre-kindergarten, parent involvement, child health and social services, and transportation to families with four-year-olds at risk of school failure.

Parents of all children who are or will be four years old on or before September 30th and are residents of Emporia or Greensville County are encouraged to attend. There will be NO TESTING. Children do NOT need to attend!

To apply, you must bring your child’s OFFICIAL birth certificate (NOT a hospital certificate), immunization record, PROOF of residency (for example: a current water/electric bill with YOUR name and address) and, because of NEW state guidelines, verification of household income (for example: paystub, W-2, Medicaid card, TANF, SNAP, WIC, SSI).

Job Fair Planned for April 10, 2019

Job Fair 2019 will be held on Wednesday, April 10, 2019 from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Southside Virginia Education Center at 1300 Greensville County Circle, Emporia.  This event is open to all job seekers so dress to impress, bring resumes, a photo id and copy of your WorkKeys Career Readiness Certificate that will be a pass to get in at 12:45. 

This event is sponsored by Southside Virginia Community College Workforce Development and Student Development Services.  For information, call Courtney Starke at 434-949-6614 or email Courtney.starke@southside.edu

Employers that will be on site include:

Lake Country Area Agency on Aging

Greensville Correctional Center

Emporia VEC

Armor Correctional Health Services

Envoy of Lawrenceville

Walmart- Emporia

Penmac Staffing Services

Greensville Health and Rehabilitation Center

Avon

P&S Trucking

Lincoln Heritage Insurance

The GEO Group

Virginia Department of Corrections

Greensville/Sussex 1

Meherrin River Regional Jail

Learning House/Partner Plus

Heritage Hall Blackstone

Melvin L. Davis Oil Company

Southside Regional Jail

State Board Committee Certifies Three Finalists for Southside Virginia Community College Presidency

RICHMOND – The State Board for Community Colleges has certified three finalists for the position of president at Southside Virginia Community College. The finalists were among 81 applicants from across the nation.

The three finalists, in alphabetical order, are Dr. Thomas G. Coley of Granger, IA; Dr. Jacqueline M. Gill of Lee’s Summit, MO; and Dr. Quentin R. Johnson of Mooresville, NC

“I am impressed with breadth and width of talent the presidency of Southside Virginia Community College is attracting,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “The college’s service region is easily the geographically largest throughout the VCCS. While that poses some unique challenges it also offers some unique opportunities for a dynamic leader to step forward and help us demonstrate what a modern rural community college can be for those who depend on it.” 

Dr. Thomas G. Coley has worked in higher education for more than 39 years. He began his career as an assistant professor at the University of Maryland at College Park in 1980. Six years later he began working at California State University, Fullerton, serving as the college’s government and community liaison. Coley proceeded to hold senior executive positions with the Oregon State System of Higher Education; Cuyahoga Community College in Cleveland, Ohio; and Black Hawk College in Moline, IL before becoming the president of Scott Community College in Scott County, Iowa in 2005. He joined Indiana’s Ivy Tech Community College System in 2011 as the chancellor of the Northwest and North Central Region. Following a system restructuring, he became the chancellor of South Bend – Elkhart campus, where he works today. Coley earned a doctorate from the University of Wisconsin, Madison as well as a master’s degree and bachelor’s degree from Minnesota State University, Moorhead.

Dr. Jacqueline M. Gill has worked in higher education for more than 20 years. She began her career as the director of continuing education for the NE Campus of Tarrant County College in Hurst, Texas. In 2010, she became the college’s vice president of Academic Affairs & Community & Industry Education. Gill moved to Kansas City, MO in 2016 where she became the president of Metropolitan Community College. Prior to working in higher education, she worked for seven years as a social worker in the greater Dallas Fort Worth metropolitan area, including two years of recruiting candidates from underserved populations into healthcare career fields for the Dallas Fort Worth Area Health Education Center in Irving, Texas . Gill earned a doctorate, master’s degree and bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University, and a separate master’s degree from the University of Texas at Arlington.

Dr. Quentin R. Johnson has worked in higher education senior leadership roles for more than 20 years. That includes, beginning in 2004, serving as the president’s chief of staff and acting vice president for Student Life and Enrollment Management at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. In 2011 he became the senior vice president for Enrollment and Student Services at Fairmont State University and Pierpont Community and Technical College in West Virginia. Johnson moved to Guilford Technical Community College in North Carolina in 2012 to become the vice president of Student Support Services, the position he holds today. He also has some Virginia experience, previously serving as the assistant dean for Enrollment Management & Student Services at the UVa School of Nursing. Johnson earned a doctorate from the University of Maryland Eastern Shore; a master’s degree from Bowling Green State University; and a bachelor’s degree from Defiance College in Defiance, Ohio.

The three finalists seek to succeed Dr. Al Roberts, the college’s fifth president, who announced last fall that he was retiring at the end of June, having served as president for five years. The finalists will each visit the college in late March to meet with faculty, staff, students and community members.

SVCC serves one small city and spans ten rural counties across southern Virginia. The college offers 23 degrees at the associate level, a host of shorter-term academic and workforce development programs, opportunities for dually enrolled high school students, adult basic education, and other transitional services for non-traditional students.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 241,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

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Laura Barnes Velvin

 

June 18, 1920 - March 23, 2019

Graveside Service

Tuesday, March 26, 2019, 11:00 AM

High Hills Cemetery
215 N. Halifax Rd, Jarratt, VA

Laura Barnes Velvin, 98, of Jarratt, passed away Saturday, March 23, 2019. She was preceded in death by her husband, James Edward Velvin and her two sons, James Venable “J.V.” Velvin and wife, Charlotte, and Lawrence Everett Velvin.

She is survived by three grandchildren, James T. Velvin (Christy), Randy Dean Velvin (Jeannie) and Andrea Velvin (Jason Williams); step-grandchildren, Scott Pritchard (Crystal) and Hope Wood; seven great-grandchildren; six great-great grandchildren; daughter-in-law, Evelyn “Scottie” Velvin and numerous nieces and nephews.

A graveside funeral service will be held 11 a.m. Tuesday, March 26 at High Hills Cemetery, Halifax Rd, Jarratt, Virginia.

Memorial contributions may be made to Jarratt Volunteer Fire Department, P.O. Box 562, Jarratt, Virginia 23867.

Marjorie Baird “Margie” King

January 19, 1943 - March 19, 2019

Visitation Services

Thursday, March 28, 2019 at 2:00 P.M.

Main St. United Methodist Church

Thursday, March 28, 2019 at 12:00 noon

Main St. United Methodist Church

 

Marjorie Baird “Margie” King, 76, died Tuesday, March 19, 2019.

Margie was a native of Lawrenceville and lived most of her adult life in Emporia. She was the daughter of the late Hobart Maryland and Blanche Edwards Baird. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by a brother; Leroy Baird and his wife Elaine and three brothers in law; John Hartley, Carter Harris, and George Roberts.

Margie was a longtime active member of Main St. United Methodist Church and the founding Member of Beta Sigma Phi Sorority in Emporia. She loved her family, friends, and her community and always had a gracious smile and hug for everyone she met.

Margie is survived by her husband of 57 years, Malcolm Lee King, Jr., daughter; Michelle King Edmonds and her husband Scott and grandson Ryan Scott Edmonds all of South Hill, brother; Joseph Edgar “J.E” Baird and his wife Cordie of Colonial Heights, sisters; Catherine Hartley of Charlotte, NC and Mary Carter Harris Roberts of Freeman, and many nieces and nephews.

A celebration of her life will be held Thursday, March 28, 2019 at 2:00 P.M. at Main St. United Methodist Church in Emporia with Rev. Tom Durrance officiating. The family will receive friends at the church from Noon until service time.

In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may be made to Beta Sigma Phi Sorority, C/O Barbara Moore, Treasurer, 626 Madison Street, Emporia, VA  23847 or Main Street United Methodist Church, 105 Church Street, Emporia, VA  23847.

Online condolences may be left at echolsfuneralhome.com.

Environmental Groups Glad About Coal Ash Cleanup Law

Sallie Inez Young

August 25, 1932 - March 20, 2019

Wake Celebration of Life

R.E. Pearson & Son Funeral Service, Inc. - Emporia

556 Halifax Street
Emporia, Virginia 23847

Diamond Grove Baptist Church
127 Diamond Grove Road
Emporia, Virginia 23847

Ms. Sallie Inez Young was born to the late Walter Young and Junita Young-Cooke of Greensville County, Virginia on August 25, 1932. She joined Antioch Baptist Church at an early age. Inez truly loved the Lord and this was often witnessed through her spreading the gospel and singing old hymns.   

Inez attended school in Greensville County. She moved to Brooklyn, New York in her early 20’s. She continued serving the Lord by attending church in New York. Also while living there, she was employed with Lloyd and Taylor for over 20 years. She retired with hopes of one day moving back to her hometown of Emporia, Va.

Inez had two daughters, Diane Young and the late Esther Young-Adams. She had one granddaughter, Crystal Adams and a devoted grandson, Craig Young who was a dedicated caregiver to Inez for over 18 years.

Inez was a very caring, strong-willed, tough woman. She always tried to be there for her family before becoming ill. One of her grandson’s most memorable moments was his first year in law school and he was low on money. Inez would call to check on him and send boxes of food to ensure he ate. That is just one way she showered her love of kindness.

Inez was preceded in death by her brothers; Curtis Young, Joe Young, Johnny Ben Young and Cecil Young and sisters; Loretta Young and Rosa Young.

Inez leaves to cherish her memories one daughter, Diane Young who expressed her love, a devoted grandson, Craig Young, granddaughter, Crystal Adams, great-grandson Ze’Marion D. Finnell, great- granddaughter, Zariah D. Finnell; two sisters; Mabiel Coe and Dorothy Newman, one brother, Eddie Young and a host of nieces, nephews, cousins and friends.

www.pearsonandsonfuneralhome.com

Ruby Estell Ferguson Pearson

November 4, 1921-March 18, 2019

Visitation Services

Friday, March 22, 2019, from 1:00 – 2:00

Forest Hill Baptist Church

Friday, March 22, 2019, from 2:00

Forest Hill Baptist Church

Ruby Estell Ferguson Pearson, at the age of 97, went to be with the Lord on March 18, 2019. She was born November 4, 1921, the oldest daughter of the late Joseph Wyatt and Annie Harrell Ferguson of Emporia VA. She was preceded in death by her husband, Major B. Pearson and daughter Virginia P. King, brothers, Kennon Ferguson Sr., C. Wade Ferguson, and H. Clayton Ferguson, sisters, Mamie F. Driver, Erma F. Vincent and Avis F. Frazier.

She is survived by her Son-in-law, Charles P. King, Grandsons, Stacy L. King (Amy Walton) and Stephen E. King. Great-Grandson, Kirby Dale King, sister Betty F. Veliky and brother Melvin L. Ferguson.

She was an active member of Forest Hill Baptist Church until her health started to decline several years ago. She loved her Lord and Savior, family, friends and Church family. She worked at Emporia Garment Factory until she retired. She loved family history and researched and gathered information for picture albums of the Ferguson and Pearson families.

Ruby loved and appreciated the staff at Northampton Nursing Home Complex, Jackson NC. Pauline, the Director of Activities encouraged her to play BINGO, and she did play twice a week up until about two weeks ago. The family thanks Emily Spence for being such a special care giver.

Visitation will be held on Friday, March 22, 2019, from 1:00 – 2:00 at Forest Hill Baptist Church with Funeral Service at 2:00 with Rev. Terry Corder officiating.

In lieu of flowers contributions may be made to: Forest Hill Baptist Church Cemetery Fund 5010 Brink Road, Emporia VA 23847

 

 

Echols Funeral Home of Emporia VA will be in charge of arrangements.

 

 

Online condolence may be made to the family at: www.echolsfuneralhome.com

Trump’s Business Dealings Violate Constitution, Attorneys General Say

Governor Signs Law Slashing Sales Tax on Personal Hygiene Products

Edmond “Bob Jack” Hicks

December 31, 1943 - March 18, 2019

Visitation

Celebration of Life

R.E. Pearson & Son Funeral Service, Inc. - Emporia

556 Halifax Street
Emporia, Virginia 23847

Emmanuel Worship Center
 
4910 East Atlantic Street
Emporia, Virginia 23847

Edmond “Bob Jack” Hicks was born to Napoleon Hicks and Isabelle Arrington Hicks on December 31, 1943 and he returned home to be with the Lord on March 18, 2019 at the VCU Community Memorial Hospital in South Hill, VA.

Bob Jack was a farmer with a fourth grade education for P. I. Rook and G. B. Ligon. Later in life, he worked for the Emporia Foundery as a welder for twenty years.

Bob Jack loved dancing, singing and playing cards. He also loved laughing and telling jokes. His favorite phrase was “I ain’t never lied!” while lying the whole time. He was so   funny and he enjoyed life to the fullest. He will truly be missed.

Bob Jack was preceded in death by eleven siblings, two whom died at birth; Robert “Toboro” Hicks (Dorothy), Junious “Bubba” Hicks (Daisy), Roosevelt “Pap” Hicks (Betty), Willie “Peter” Hicks (Bettie), Archie “Sack” Hicks, Eddie Lewis “Manna” Hicks (Dorris), Rebecca “Sis" Washington (Tommie), Thelma “Duke” Robinson (Albert), and Blanch Barbara “Alene” Hicks (Bufford).

Bob Jack leaves to cherish his memories his wife, Martha Anne Hicks, children; Ricky Mills (Nadine), Aaron Stewart (Qreatha), step-children; Diane, Doreatha and Isabell, grandchildren; Shamila Beslow (Vernon III), Antione Ingram (Cindy), Corey Faulcon, Aaron Stewart, Jr., and Rico Stewart, great grandchildren; Joshua Bane (Defontney), Christopher Maga, III, Kenneth Thompkins, Jr., Antoine Ingram, Jr. and Arianna Ingram, one great great granddaughter, Esma Bane, one sister, Rosa “Missy-Gal” Franklin (George) and a host of nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends.

www.pearsonandsonfuneralhome.com

 

Norman Eugene Kramer

 

Norman Eugene Kramer, 84, of Emporia, Va. passed away peacefully on Sunday, March 17, 2019, at Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center. He was the son of Lester Kramer and Gesina Norman Kramer. Norman was a retired communication specialist with the United States government.

Norman is survived by his loving wife, Mary Frances Derring Kramer of Emporia, Va., daughter, Laura Kramer Rose (Russell) of Vienna, Va., son, Mark Kramer (Gina) of Vienna, Va., Stepsons, Richard H. Short III (Betsy) of Emporia, Va., and John C. Short (Janet) of Bracey, Va., grandchildren, Ryan Rose, Sean Rose, Naomi Kramer, and Angela Kramer, all of Vienna, Va., step grandchildren, Ryan Short (Paula) of Littleton, NC., Alex Short and Allison Short of Emporia, Va., Parker Short of Smithfield, Va., and Nicholas Short of Blacksburg, Va., and a step great granddaughter, Mary Katherine Short of Littleton, NC.

A celebration for Norman Kramer will be held on Sunday, March 31, 2019, at 2:00PM, at Lakeside Lutheran Church, 2427 Eaton Ferry Road, Littleton, NC 27850.

Memorials may be made to: Lakeside Lutheran Church Building Fund.

Online condolences may be sent to the family at: www.echolsfuneralhome.com

Advocate Draws From Personal Experience as Example to Youth

Virginia House of Delegates v. Bethune-Hill

Attorney General Mark R. Herring issued the following statement after oral argument in the U.S. Supreme Court in Virginia House of Delegates v. Bethune-Hill:

“This case has cost Virginians four years of litigation, multiple elections under an unconstitutional map, and probably more than $10 million, mostly spent by House Republicans to defend racial gerrymandering. The trial Court issued 100 pages of factual findings explaining the ways that the plan ‘sorted voters into districts based on the color of their skin’ and reduced the political power of African-Americans. That is wrong. We should all be concerned about this race-based violation of Virginians’ right to vote and should work to fix it as soon as possible. 

“Nothing I heard today changes my belief that it is time to put an end to this case, and to implement fair, constitutional districts.”

In June 2018, a three-judge panel found that eleven House of Delegates districts were unconstitutional. In July 2018, Attorney General Herring announced that the Commonwealth of Virginia would not appeal the decision, citing the seriousness of the constitutional violation, the likelihood of success, and the considerable time and millions in taxpayer money that had already been expended. 

The three-judge panel and Supreme Court have three times denied requests by the House of Delegates to delay implementation of a new redistricting plan that corrects the identified racial gerrymandering.

Virginia Electric Utilities Wiring Rural Areas for Broadband

Occupational Health Services for Area Employers

Let’s build a healthy workforce, together.

South Hill—As you know, your team members are the single most important and valuable resource in your organization. A healthier team member is often a more productive team member. VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital Health and Wellness Services provides team member health services required and needed in today’s world of business and industry. We can help your business reach its goals for a healthier workforce.

A healthier workforce will decrease lost work time, provide more productive and motivated employees, reduce health care and worker’s compensation costs andreduce workplace injuries.

For more than 17 years, the professionals with VCU Health CMH Health & Wellness Services have been responsive to the health needs of the corporate community.  Currently they contract with numerous companies throughout the region to provide such services as:  pre-employment physicals, DOT physicals, rapid drug screens, lab based drug screens (urine, hair follicle), breath alcohol testing, immunizations, OSHA hearing conservation education and testing and much, much more. 

Learn more about how you can make your workforce healthier by visiting our website at vcu-cmh.org and downloading a brochure or calling (434) 774-2541.

Meet the professional staff of VCU Health CMH Occupational Health: (pictured from left to right)  Linda Crump, Office Service Specialist; Donna Overton, LPN, COHC, BAT, SAMI-DOT; Amy Hobbs, FNP-C; DeeAnna Forbes, LPN, COHC, BAT APS-DOT; Jessica Seamster, LPN, BAT, APS-DOT

Institute of Contemporary Art Hosts Queer Film Collective Dirty Looks

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