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May 2019

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VCH Health CMH Nursing Awards

The 2019 Nursing Awards winners this year include (pictured left to right) Margie Bartlett, Certified Surgical Tech, VCU Health CMH’s 2019 Dee McMillian Nurse Partner Award recipient; Tracy Bailey, RN, VCU Health CMH’s 2019 Alice Tudor Professional Nursing Award recipient; Cheryl Newcomb, LPN, VCU Health CMH’s 2019 Carole Love Practical Nurse Award recipient; and Mary Hardin, CNO, VCU Health CMH’s Ursula Butts Leadership Award recipient.

Every year during Nurses Week, VCU Health CMH presents awards to 3 deserving employees. New this year there is the addition of a fourth award for leadership.

The Dee McMillian Nurse Care Partnership award is named after the late Dee McMillian who was a true nurse partner for many nurses and nursing staff at VCU Health CMH.

The Carole Love Licensed Practical Nurse award is named in honor of Carole Love, RN, BSN, for her exemplary contributions to nursing at CMH.

The Alice Tudor Professional Nursing award is named in honor of Alice Tudor, RN, for the dedicated, professional and passionate care she provided to patients at VCU Health CMHfor over 50 years.

The Ursula Butts Leadership award is named for Ursula Butts, MSHA, in appreciation and recognition to an outstanding leader for her visionary guidance and exemplary leadership.

Also during the event, Erin Davis, RN, BSN, was recognized for the first VCU Service Excellence award and Hillary Tackett, RN, was recognized for the VHHA 1st Safety award.

Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center and the Family YMCA of Emporia – Greensville Partner to Provide FREE Health Fair for Community

Emporia, VA – On Tuesday, May 21, Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center (SVRMC) employees will be volunteering their expertise and medical services to the YMCA for a health fair from 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. Nurses and hospital staff will be offering health screenings and have information and refreshments.

The health fair will be inside the YMCA located at 212 Weaver Ave in Emporia in Group Fitness Studio 2. This event is free and open to the public.

Care Advantage Continues to Grow with the acquisition of Capital City Nurses.

Care Advantage expands presence into Maryland, Delaware and Washington D.C.

Richmond, VA – May 13, 2019 – Care Advantage, Inc. (“Care Advantage”), one of the Mid-Atlantic’s largest private owned, homecare servicing companies and a BelHealth Investment Partners, LLC (“BelHealth”) portfolio company, announced the acquisitions of Capital City Nurses and Coastal Home Care today. The award-winning Care Advantage continues to build on the momentum of the last 24 months by growing its presence throughout the Mid-Atlantic. The addition of Capital City Nurses and Coastal Home Care broadens Care Advantage’s footprint into Washington DC, Maryland and Delaware for the first time.

This union of capability and talent, their largest to date, further demonstrates a commitment by Care Advantage, Inc. to their mission by offering exceptional services to its clients, a nurturing environment to their nursing teams and employees, and making a positive contribution to the communities they serve.

Headquartered in Chevy Chase, MD, Capital City Nurses was founded by Sue Rodgers, a nurse, over 40 years ago and currently operates six offices throughout Maryland, Virginia, Delaware and Washington D.C. The company provides personal care services in the home primarily to private pay clients and maintains a staff of over 500 caregivers consisting of RNs, LPNs and CNAs.

Tim Hanold, CEO of Care Advantage, said, “This is an exciting acquisition for Care Advantage, and I am thrilled to welcome the Capital City Nurses team to our home care family. Our businesses complement each other well from a cultural standpoint and both from a geographic and service mix. Capital City Nurses is exactly what we were looking for in a partner. We believe this acquisition positions Care Advantage well for continued growth not only in our stronghold of Virginia but across our Mid-Atlantic footprint. I couldn’t be more excited about the future.”

Brian Rodgers, COO of Capital City Nurses, added, “Ever since my first meeting with Tim and BelHealth, I could tell that I’d be partnering with a like-minded home care company that prioritizes client care and home care leadership. The Capital City Nurses and Coastal Teams are thrilled to be joining the Care Advantage Family and excited to leverage the resources of our larger and collective organization. While, this merger marks a momentous moment in our company’s history. It is important to emphasize that Capital City Nurses and Coastal Home Care remain committed and focused on our clients and referral partners.”

Care Advantage is one of the Mid-Atlantic’s leading privately held home healthcare providers. The Company specializes in “one-on-one” quality nursing care in the home and is a one-stop shop for home healthcare services. Corporate headquarters are in Richmond, and there are 24 branch locations throughout Virginia, Maryland, Delaware and Washington D.C. The Company provides a mix of Medicaid and self-pay nursing and personal care services such as bathing, dressing, and companionship and also provides “skilled” services primarily by licensed nurses and therapists.

Brunswick Academy Graduation

Brunswick Academy will hold its Baccalaureate Service on Sunday, May 19, 2019 at 6:00 PM.  The guest speaker will be Reverend Greg Hand of Pleasant Hill Christian Church in Gasburg, Virginia.  Commencement Exercises will be held in the gymnasium on Friday, May 24, 2019 at 7:00 p.m.  Twenty-nine seniors will be graduating.

 

The valedictorian is Jonathan Davis Paul, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Paul of Emporia, Virginia.   Jonathan will be attending The University of Virginia School of Engineering and Applied Science.

The salutatorian is Courtney Ann Walton, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joey Walton of Lawrenceville, Virginia.  Courtney will be attending North Carolina State University’s College of Engineering.

There will be seven other honor graduates at this year’s graduation. They are, listed below in alphabetical order:

Kyleigh Faye Capps, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Tim Capps of Littleton, North Carolina.  Kyleigh will be attending Halifax Community College.

Taylor Brooke Capps, daughter of Ms. Crystal Capps of Lawrenceville, Virginia. Taylor will be attending The University of Virginia.

Jacob Brady Farmer, son of Brad Farmer of Lawrenceville, Virginia and Heidi Smith of Lawrenceville, Virginia.  Jacob will be attending The Cormier Honors College at Longwood University.

Savannah Paige Greene, daughter of Mr. C.K. Greene of Dolphin, Virginia and Mrs. Tammy Greene of Lawrenceville, Virginia.  Savannah will be attending the Pamplin School of Business at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

Morgan Elizabeth Moore, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Moore of Emporia, Virginia.  Morgan will be attending the Honors College of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

Lucy Holloway Smith, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Smith of South Hill, Virginia. Lucy will be attending Radford University’s School of Nursing and Honors College.  

Hannah Nicole Waller, daughter of Mrs. Jenni Oakley of Brodnax, Virginia.  Hannah will be attending The University of Virginia.

Twelve seniors are children of Brunswick Academy alumni.

Doggie Fashion Show Marks 15th Anniversary of the Emporia Greensville Humane Society

They come every year.

Every May Golden Leaf commons is filled with celebrities – movie stars, rock stars, and super heroes.

Elvis was here one year. Batman and Superman have been here, too.

It’s not an invasion, though, just time for the Doggie Fashion Show. The best part is that there is still time for you go get your tickets.

The Doggie Fashion Show and Luncheon is the premier fund-raiser for the Emporia Greensville Humane Society, and this year marks the 11th time that the show has been presented.  According to Peggy Malone, the money raised by the Doggie Fashion Show “goes to benefit the animals.  The Doggie Show has made it possible to continue to do our work for the animals.”

The other fundraiser for the organization is a Boston Butt Sale each year.

It has been 15 years since the need for additional services for animals in need of rescue and forever homes was addressed. The Emporia Greensville Humane Society started with a cattery for stray cats and moved soon included a shelter for dogs.

Since their founding the Emporia Greensville Humane Society has saved and adopted over 900 dogs and cats and one rabbit. They were the first rescue group in this area. When the group started 15 years ago animals were not saved instead they were euthanized in the shelters. The Emporia Greensville Humane Society is a no-kill shelter, and while some animals are still are euthanized that number is significantly lower than it once was.

The Emporia Greensville Humane Society claims responsibility for having the gas chamber removed from the shelter from animal shelter then shared by the City and County.

From the group’s Facebook page: “I am very proud of the changes that EGHS has brought forward for the animals in our area. We need your support to continue our work.” For information call or to donate or adopt the newest member of your family, call (434)634-3413.

Mortality Rates for Breast Cancer Reflect Health Disparities

"Why"

Why do some call their mother "Ma"
and maybe some use "Mom"
it's because she is so many things
and those two are just some.
 
Yes in early life she nurtured us
and made us quite aware
that in this strange world of growing up
we had somewone to care.
 
She made our meals
and played with us games
yes and at she never put to bed
without kissing us goodnight.
 
Mom took us to practice and the games
and told us to have fun
dad never knew till we got home
whether we lost or won.
 
Each year they have a special day
and this is rightly so
yes when dad is busy or at work
to who else could we go.
 
A mom shouldn't have to wonder
how you feel about her each day
so take the time and tell her
a very small price to pay
 
                         - Roy E. Schepp

Editorial-Food Insecurity in Emporia

food in·se·cu·ri·ty

noun

noun: food insecurity

  1. the state of being without reliable access to a sufficient quantity of affordable, nutritious food.

"more than 800 million people live every day with hunger or food insecurity as their constant companion"

In the article from the Capital News Service that appears below, there is an infographic with the percentage of “food insecure people” in each locality in the Commonwealth of Virginia.

I have added a caption to this graphic that notes the percentage of the residents of the City of Emporia who are “food insecure.”

24.4 percent (1,341 people) of our neighbors are considered to be “food insecure,” meaning that they have no reliable access to nutritious foods, including fresh produce. 16.8 percent (2,832 people) of the citizens of Greensville County are also considered “food insecure.”

What is being done to reduce that number?

It is unclear if Congress will be able to help, but the bill sponsored by our own Representative, Donald McEachin, failed to classify Emporia as a “food desert,” even with the enhancements to that definition. According to the bill in question, any locality with 20% or more of the citizens living in poverty, or where the median household income is 80% or less than the statewide median household income is a “food desert.”

Here in Emporia, 30.9% of the population lives in poverty. That percentage equates to 1,968 people. Nearly 2000 people live below the federal poverty level.  Our median household income of $27,426 is 39.89% of the statewide median household income of $68,756. In Greensville County 17% of the population lives below the poverty level and the median household income of $42,121 is less than 80% of the statewide median income. (Sources https://datausa.io/profile/geo/emporia-va/#economy, https://datausa.io/profile/geo/greensville-county-va)

Given both of those numbers the City of Emporia and Greensville County should be considered “food deserts” under the definition of the Healthy Food Access for all Americans Act (HFAAA).

There was a bill in the Virginia General Assembly that provided $5 million to help attract, build or renovate stores in localities that are underserved. That bill died in the Appropriations Committee of the House of Delegates.

On a local level, it is up to non-government-organizations to fill the gap. The most visible of those in the City is the Samaritan Helping Hands Home on North Main Street where lunch is provided on weekdays. During the summer, Greensville County Public Schools participates in the USDA sponsored summer lunch program. Feedmore, the foodbank for Central Virginia serves three agencies, only one of which is actually in the City.

As an offshoot of the summer feeding program, Main Street United Methodist Church offers a free Community Meal on the fourth Sunday of each month at 5:30 pm. This meal is, in addition an opportunity to help feed neighbors in need, for anyone who shows up. Food is prepared for 50 people, and all are welcome. For full disclosure, I have a leadership role in the Community Meal Ministry at MSUMC. If anyone is interested in starting a similar ministry at their own church on a different Sunday, I will gladly help.

In Greensville County, where 16.8% of the citizens are “food insecure,” there are two locations served by Feedmore: Elnora Jarrell Worship Center and Garden of Prayer, but only El Shaddai Ministry (the former St. James Episcopal Church) is in the City of Emporia.

At Elnora Jarrell Worship Center food is distributed from 3:30 to 4 pm every Tuesday and Thursday and from 9 to 11 am on the second Saturdays.

At Garden of Prayer food is distributed on the first Monday, but no time is given by the Feedmore website.

Here in the City El Shaddai Ministry distributes food from 9 to 11 am on the second and third Saturdays.

For the combined City and County, food is distributed for 10 and one half hours each month. Logistically, 10 ½ hours is not nearly enough time to distribute food for 4,173 people. I have personally approached Feedmore about adding another location. Had they been amenable, I would have presented that to the Church Council, with the hope of adding our parking lot to the list of locations for the Mobile Food Pantry. Feedmore shut me down in quick order, but I am armed with statistics, and will try again.

Here are the days and times for agencies served by Feedmore, copied and pasted directly from their website:

El Shaddai Ministry
609 Halifax Street , Emporia, VA 23847
Phone: 434-594-2680
Thursday, 09:00 AM to 11:00 AM, 2nd & 3rd

Elnora Jarrell Worship Center
490 Liberty Road, Emporia, VA 23847
Phone: 434-336-9990
Tuesday, 03:30 PM to 04:00 PM, WEEKLY
Thursday, 03:30 PM to 04:00 PM, WEEKLY
Saturday, 09:00 AM to 11:00 AM, 3RD

Garden of Prayer
386 Slagles Lake Road, Emporia, VA 23847
Phone: 434-632-1252
Monday, 1st

It is budget season for both the City and County, yet neither budget has any assistance for feeding the hungry.

The proposed city budget includes a 4% increase for water and a 4% increase for sewer, plus a $2 increase for sanitation. That is a $3.63 increase on the minimum-usage monthly water bill (the minimum billing for water/sewer/sanitation was about $30 15 years ago and will now be nearly $100). That $3.63 is got to come from somewhere in the family budget, and given that many people in poverty are already forced to decide between paying the bills and buying food (and medicine) for their families, I would wager that the money will come from the already meager grocery budget.

The lack of nutritional food increases health issues, so it is no wonder that our community is also one of the least healthy of all localities in the Commonwealth, ranking 128 out of 133 in Health Outcomes (http://www.emporianews.com/content/report-shows-geographic-disparities-health-virginia).

Long term, education is the key to getting our community out of this situation. With a well educated populace, we will be better able to attract business and industry. Even if we were to improve our schools, we would likely not see results for a generation, especially given the number of years that the system has been under-funded.

Greensville County has a major Industrial Park in the works, but still refuses to do more that level-fund the Greensville County Public Schools. In fact, the proposed budgets for both the City and the County only level-fund our schools, as opposed to full funding – leaving the schools with more than one-million dollars less than they asked for. What major industry wants to locate in a place where they cannot hire an educated work-force?

Our library has cut hours in the time I have lived here. If our local governments were forward-thinking, the library would also receive increased funding, especially given the lack of broadband internet access in the more rural areas of the county and the economic hardships faced by the poor economy in the area (those living in poverty cannot afford the steep price of high-speed internet from Comcast), and the computers at the library are the only source of high-speed internet access for many.

Greensville County is spending millions of dollars to move Social Services to the County (most of the shared services have been moved out of the city), that money could be better spent elsewhere. In the city, they are apparently still considering spending hundreds of thousands of dollars to tear down the auditorium, which is (once again) money that could be better spent elsewhere. The City’s share of the debt service on the new Social Services building in the County is already more than $100,000, and the building is only in the initial phases of construction. Citizens are also on the hook for the debt service for the addition to the Greensville County Sherriff’s Department of which the City’s share is nearly $40K.

An increase in water service - for water that is not even palatable and leaves black mold-like deposits in pipes and toilets - is only going to continue to hurt the poorest among us. It is high time that both the City and County find new streams of revenue.

In the City, our prepared meals tax is already at the maximum, and revenue from our transient tax is projected to fall now that all of the power plants are finished. City Council is no longer considering a Cigarette Tax. A cigarette tax was proposed in previous budgets and people were very upset. The outcry was enough that the idea was scrapped. It is unclear if it was considered again, but the idea is not in the proposed budget. Nor were any other new sources of revenue.

Unless our City Council and Board of Supervisors drastically change their priorities, large numbers of our friends and neighbors are destined to be poor, hungry, sick and under-educated.

Farms Feed Food Banks to Fight Hunger

Register Your Team for the Reekes Memorial Tournament

The Southside Virginia Community College Foundation presents the Fred “Freddie” Reekes Annual Memorial Golf Classic on Wednesday, June 5, 2019 at the Lake Gaston Golf Club.  Sign up now to participate in this highly anticipated event.  This year, Honorary Tournament Chairs are Shep Moss, Ken Peace, David Talbert and Andy Walker, all of whom were influenced by  Reekes when he taught at Brunswick High School.

The event is a Captain’s Choice Format with three flights awarded, first, second and third.  For more information or to register a team or become a sponsor contact

Donna Worley at 434 939 1008, donna.worley@southside.edu Bobby Wrenn at 434 594 4149 or Mary Elkins at 434 949 1051 or Mary. Elkins@southside.edu

STATE POLICE TO HONOR TROOPER LUCAS B. DOWELL DURING ANNUAL LAW ENFORCEMENT MEMORIAL SERVICE

RICHMOND – In advance of National Police Week, the men and women of the Virginia State Police and their families will gather together Thursday, May 9, 2019, to honor those public safety professionals who have given the ultimate sacrifice in their service to the Commonwealth of Virginia. During the 2019 Virginia State Police Officers’ Memorial Service, special recognition will be given to Trooper Lucas B. Dowell, 28, who lost his life Feb. 4, 2019 in Cumberland County. Virginia Senator Charles W. Carrico Sr., 40th District, will provide the ceremony’s keynote address.

A poignant part of the service will be the unveiling and dedication of Trooper Dowell’s portrait before his family and fellow troopers. Following the ceremony, Trooper Dowell’s portrait will be hung in the Colonel C.W. Woodson Jr. Memorial Gallery located within the Virginia State Police Academy. The gallery already holds the portraits of the state police’s other 65 courageous men and women who died in the line-of-duty while serving the citizens of the Commonwealth.

On Feb. 4, 2019, Trooper Dowell was assisting the Piedmont Regional Drug and Gang Task Force in his capacity as a member of the Virginia State Police Appomattox Division Tactical Team. The Tactical Team was executing a search warrant at a residence in the 1500 block of Cumberland Road/Route 45, just north of the town limits of Farmville. The Tactical Team had made entry into the residence when an adult male inside the residence began firing at the Tactical Team and subsequently shot Trooper Dowell. The Tactical Team members returned fire, fatally wounding the male suspect. Trooper Dowell was transported to Southside Community Hospital in Farmville, where he succumbed to his injuries.

The service will recognize all of the Department’s law enforcement professionals who have died in the line of duty, to include a special tribute to the following 12 troopers in which 2019 marks a significant milestone:                

 5 Years: Sergeant J. Michael Phillippi (2014 – Henry Co.)

20 Years: Trooper Daniel Lee Williams (1999 – Cumberland Co.)

30 Years: Trooper Jerry Lynn Hines (1989 – Rockbridge Co.)

35 Years: Sergeant James LeRoy Biggs (1984 – Alleghany Co.)

35 Years: Trooper Johnny Rush Bowman (1984 – City of Manassas)

45 Years: Trooper James Read Hughes (1974 – Fairfax Co.)

65 Years: Trooper Robert Louis Loder, Jr. (1954 – Hanover Co.)

65 Years: Trooper Robert Fulton Giles (1954 – Wise Co.)

80 Years: Sergeant Clarence Lemuel Maynard (1939 – Washington Co.)

85 Years: Trooper Charles Bazil Bullock (1934 – Fairfax Co.)

90 Years: Inspector Curtis Lee Wood (1929 – James City Co.)

90 Years: Inspector Phillip C. Via (1929 – Waynesboro) *Year & Location of Death

Each tribute includes a single bell toll and an Honor Guard salute.

SVRMC Celebrates National Women’s Health Week

During National Women's Health Week each year, millions of women take steps to improve their health. The week serves as a reminder for women to make their health a priority and build positive health habits for life. The 20th annual National Women's Health Week kicks off on Mother's Day, May 12, and is celebrated through May 18, 2019. Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center (SVRMC) encourages all women to be as healthy as possible.

To improve your physical and mental health, you can:

Anu Akinsanya, M.D., an OB-GYN with Southside Physicians Network (SPN) in Emporia, takes women’s health very seriously. According to the CDC, the number of births in the United States is the lowest it’s been in 30 years. The only age group that is increasing is those over 40. Dr. Akinsanya explains, “We’re seeing increasing incidence of chronic disease prevalence and high-risk pregnancies as our population ages.” She makes it her goal to always listen to her patients to catch any complications and make sure mothers understand the things they can control to have the best outcomes for their deliveries.

She not only takes care of moms but helps women through all stages of life. Services include but are not limited to HPV vaccines, PMS symptoms, contraception, menopause and cancer screenings. Learn more about how Dr. Akinsanya can help you with your pregnancy or ongoing care. Call 434-755-3414 to schedule an appointment. She sees patients at the SPN office located at 511 Belfield Drive, Emporia, VA 23847.

VCU Health CMH Offering Summer Babysitting Course

SOUTH HILL --The Health & Wellness Department of VCU Health Community Memorial Hospital in South Hill will offer the Smartkids 101 Babysitting Training Course this summer.

The Smartkids 101 Babysitting Training Course is especially designed for students 11 to 14 years old.  It teaches essential child care skills needed for responsible babysitters caring for infants, toddlers and older children.

The class will include child and infant safety, poison control, CPR, first aid and basic child care skills.  At the end of the class, students will receive a babysitting certificate and be certified in American Heart-Heart Savers CPR and First Aid.  Students will also be taught to react in an emergency situation and know who to call.  Students will learn about the babysitting business, build self-esteem and learn skills that will last a lifetime.

This one day, 8-hour course will be taught in the VCU Health CMH Education Center (inside the C.A.R.E. Building) at 1755 N. Mecklenburg Avenue in South Hill from 8 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. on the following dates: June 7th, June 20th, June 28th and July 12th.  The class is free but limited to 10 participants. To register for one of these courses, please contact the Health & Wellness department at 434-584-5390. These classes fill up quickly, so call today!

2019 SVCC Diesel Tech Graduates

Southside Virginia Community College's Diesel Technician program celebrated graduates for 2019 recently   They are Front L-R:  Alex Payne (DE Student Powhatan), Paul Elliott (S. Prince George), Cody Lynn (Crewe), Corey Taylor (Charlotte CH), Antonion Uribe (Lawrenceville), Wilson Treese (McKenney) Bryan Lewis (Instructor)

Back L-R:  Billy McGraw (Instructor) Russell Hicks (Instructor), Tyler Pattison (Chesterfield), Malik Gentry (Roseland), Tyler Foore (Amelia Courthouse), Ethan Eggleston (S. Chesterfield) and Jacob Guill (Red Oak)

Southside Virginia Community College Truck Driver Training Graduates from Pickett Park on April 18, 2019

Front: L-R: Zachary Phillips (Kenbridge), Shaun Bragg (Warrenton, NC), Grego Coleman (Chesterfield), Juan Garcia (Alberta), A J Spino (Ebony) Bobby Doyon (instructor)

Back L-R:  Reggie White (Instructor), Doug Kemerer (Instructor), Zach Williams (Clarksville), Tom Jones (Crewe), Jonathon Folz (Rice), Mike Turner (South Hill) Duncan Quicke TDTS Coorinator, Nikki Weaver , ATA Road Team Captain and Driver for Fed Ex Freight.

As Hospitals Monitor Drugs, Opioid Deaths See Decline

SVCC Dual Enrollment Students Collaborate with Microsoft and Schneider Electric

Those who worked on the prototype insulator project are(Left to Right)Desmyn Owens, Tiffany Broadnax-Bacon, Jordan Wesson, Bryana Murphy, Philip Poole,  Ayanna Coleman, Ronnie Boyter, John Mize, Kiman McCarthy, Seita McCarthy, Justin Stansell, Vincent Brown and Scott Edmonds.

Southside Virginia Community College’s dual enrollment program is taking the student learning experience to the next level. Over the past few months,the students have been collaborating with Schneider Electric and Microsoft to rapid prototype an insulator for a DC terminal block. For these Park View High School students, this involvement has been an invaluable real-world experience.

The proposed project idea started when John Mize, Electrical Maintenance Lead for Schneider Electric, a facility management company for Microsoft, could not find an electrical cover for a high voltage electrical junction box at the Boydton datacenter. When nothing fit the specifications, he recommended working with SVCC to 3D print the part. Philip Poole, Schneider’s Critical Facility Manager drafted the design parameters and Justin Stansell, an electrical engineer for Microsoft, worked to ensure all electrical insulating properties were achieved.

The next step was involving the Advanced Manufacturing dual-enrollment students who attend class at SVCC at Lake Country Advanced Knowledge Center (LCAKC) in South Hill. 

Vincent Brown, Professor of Industrial Technologies, presented the challenge to the students.

“Simply put, I asked each student to see how they would write the code for the program and how they would solve this problem” stated Brown.

Each one quickly analyzed and researched how they would design a 3D printed electric cover. Utilizing the Autodesk Inventor program, each student inputted their design. Once this task was complete, the parts were sent to one of the 3D printers housed at the LCAKC.

Students and brothers, Kimani and Seita McCarthy, each described how they tackled the challenge.

“I measured the gap holes and then factored in an extra ½ inch gap, but this left a large gap, which was a safety issue” added Kimani.

“My approach was similar” quotes Seita, “but my overall design had to be tweaked to fit properly.”

Ronnie Boyter, and Brianna Murphy, each contributed but stressed the importance of measuring for accuracy after printing. Our main goal was to make sure our designs were safe, precise and ergonomically compliant for Schneider, they said.  

In a classroom setting producing a realistic workforce project is difficult, but when you have the opportunity to work directly with local companies the classroom training morphs into vibrant work experience. Once the fabricated prototypes were tested and modifications made, the part was approved for installation.

Recently, the students met with  Mize, Poole, and  Stansell, and explained their design methodology. As Stansell listened, he encouraged the teams to learn from each other’s design and collaborate to enhance the overall design.

Both Kimani and Seita have been accepted at Virginia Tech and will pursue degrees in engineering. Murphy has been accepted to Longwood where she is pursuing a Science degree. Boyter plans on attending SVCC in the fall to complete his degree in Industrial Maintenance. This is just a sampling of the outstanding young minds learning and growing with SVCC.

Brown, explains, “The graduates from Southside Virginia’s dual enrollment program, walk away prepared to enter the workforce or to attend four-year university. Many of the former students are now employed with Dominion Energy, Army Corp of Engineers, NASA, Newport News, MC Dean, and Rolls Royce and many local industries.  It’s exciting to be a part of a program that has such a positive impact on the lives of students .”

 “Over the course of a year, we start with students who are unsure of what direction or career path they want to pursue, but after exposure to our programs, teachers and training facility, they finish with a clear picture of the direction they want to follow,” said Tiffany Broadnax-Bacon, LCAK Center Director.

One of the goals of SVCC is to prepare students for the local workforce.  With small classroom sizes and dedicated teachers, these goals are being met. Whether you call it career, vocational, or workforce training, these dual enrollment students are immersed in technologies of the future. And that is Real World!

GOD’S GOUDA: Sisters in Albemarle County Make Cheese

ATTORNEY GENERAL HERRING URGES FCC TO TAKE ACTION AGAINST ROBOCALLS AND SPOOFING

~ Coalition of 42 attorneys general press FCC to act further to reduce spoofed calls and texts ~

RICHMOND (May 6, 2019) – Today, Attorney General Mark R. Herring joined 41 other attorneys general in calling on the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to take further action to stop the growing proliferation of illegal robocalls and spoofing. In formal legal comments, the attorneys general urged the FCC to adopt its proposed rules on enforcement against caller ID spoofing on calls to the United States originating from overseas, while also addressing spoofing in text messaging and alternative voice services. These provisions are included in the FCC's appropriations authorization bill also known as the RAY BAUM’S Act of 2018.

The number of spoofed calls and the consumer financial losses tied to these scams have increased by nearly 50 percent in recent years. 

“Robocalls and spoof phone calls are not only annoying but they are also potentially dangerous and could scam Virginians out of hundreds or thousands of dollars,” said Attorney General Herring. “As Attorney General, it is my job to protect Virginia consumers, which is why I have joined my colleagues today to call on the FCC to take further actions against these obnoxious and illegal scam calls.”

According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), Virginia was the 7th highest state in the nation for Do Not Call Registry complaints with 181,936 complaints in 2018. Additionally, Virginians made more than 118,000 complaints to the FTC about robocalls alone.

Americans received almost 18 billion scam robocalls in 2018 and overall, robocalls increased in the U.S. by 57 percent from 2017 to 2018. The FCC reports that imposter scams have reportedly cost consumers $488 million just in 2018.

Joining Attorney General Herring in sending the comments to the FCC were the attorneys general from Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, Washington, and West Virginia.

“Wake Up Call”

Yesterday I passed a large vacant lot
though I can’t tell you where
you see if the city finds out about this
they’ll want to put a hotel there.
 
Now we’ve already the accommodations
for the tired tourist trade at night
worn down from listening to the whistle blow
and trips to the park to fly their kite.
 
Just drive around our city
and see the presence of decay
they’re opening up small stores everywhere
but few of them will stay.
 
The most won’t show a profit
for the rent is much too high
perhaps the need to compromise
or the willingness to try.
 
The signs all tell the story
and are in our tourist view
for sale, for rent and moving
plus going out of business too.
 
Now some time ago I mentioned
about my friends, Billy Bob and Sally
they stayed one night; then told their friends don’t stop
for they have no bowling alley.

 

 
                         - Roy E. Schepp

Soybean Growers Have Opportunity to Request a Referendum for Soybean Promotion, Research, and Information Program

The Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) announces that soybean producers may request a referendum to determine whether producers want the Secretary to conduct a referendum on the Soybean Promotion and Research Order (Order), as authorized under the Soybean Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Act (Act). Participation in the request for referendum is voluntary.  Producers should participate only if they wish to request a referendum on the program.

If at least 10 percent, not to exceed ⅕ of producers from any 1 State, of the 515,008 eligible producers determined by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) participate in the request for referendum, a referendum will be held within 1 year from that determination. If results of the request for referendum indicate that a referendum is not supported, a referendum will not be conducted. The results of the request for referendum will be published in a notice in the Federal Register.

To Request Referendum:

Soybean producers may request a referendum during the 4-week period beginning May 6, 2019 and ending May 31, 2019.

To be eligible to participate in the request for referendum, producers must certify that they or the producer entity they are authorized to represent paid an assessment at any time between January 1, 2017, and December 31, 2018.

Form LS-51-1, Soybean Promotion and Research Order Request for Referendum, can be obtained from May 6, 2019, to May 31, 2019, by mail, FAX, or in person from Farm Service Agency (FSA) County Offices, or can be downloaded from https://www.ams.usda.gov/rules-regulations/research- promotion/soybean. Completed forms and supporting documentation must be returned to the appropriate FSA County Office:

By FAX or in person no later than COB on May 31, 2019.

By mail postmarked by midnight on May 31, 2019 and must be received in the FSA County Office by COB on June 6, 2019.

Contact

Kenneth R. Payne, Director
Research and Promotion Division
Livestock and Poultry Program
AMS, USDA
Room 2610-S, STOP 0251
1400 Independence Avenue SW.
Washington, DC 20250-0251
Telephone:  (202) 720-1118
FAX:  (202) 720-1125
E-mail: kenneth.payne@usda.gov

 

Rick Pinkston, Field Operations Staff
FSA, USDA

 

Telephone:  (202) 720-1857

 

FAX:  (202) 720-1096

 

E-mail:  rick.pinkston@wdc.usda.gov

 

USDA Extends Deadline to May 17 for Producers to Certify 2018 Crop Production for Market Facilitation Program Payments

WASHINGTON, April 29, 2019 – USDA extended the deadline to May 17 from May 1 for agricultural producers to certify 2018 crop production for payments through the Market Facilitation Program (MFP), which helps producers who have been significantly affected by foreign tariffs, resulting in the loss of traditional exports. USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) extended the deadline because heavy rainfall and snowfall have delayed harvests in many parts of the country, preventing producers from certifying production.

Payments will be issued only if eligible producers certify before the updated May 17 deadline.

The MFP provides payments to producers of corn, cotton, sorghum, soybeans, wheat, dairy, hogs, fresh sweet cherries and shelled almonds. FSA will issue payments based on the producer’s certified total production of the MFP commodity multiplied by the MFP rate for that specific commodity.

“Trade issues, coupled with low commodity prices and recovery from natural disasters, have definitely impacted the bottom line for many agricultural producers,” said FSA Administrator Richard Fordyce. “The MFP payments provide short-term relief from retaliatory tariffs to supplement the traditional farm safety net, helping agricultural producers through these difficult times. Weather conditions this fall, winter and early spring have blocked many producers from completing harvest of their crops, and we want to make sure producers who want to finalize their MFP application have an opportunity.”

Producers can certify production by contacting their local FSA office or through farmers.gov.

About the Market Facilitation Program

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue launched the trade mitigation program to assist farmers suffering from damage because of unjustified trade retaliation by foreign nations. FSA implemented MFP in September 2018 as a relief strategy to protect agricultural producers while the Administration works on free, fair and reciprocal trade deals to open more markets to help American farmers compete globally. To date, more than $8.3 billion has been paid to nearly 600,000 applicants.

The MFP is established under the statutory authority of the Commodity Credit Corporation Charter Act and is administered by FSA.

New Civil War Museum Sheds Light on Untold Stories

Jackson-Feild’s Bible School Benefits Others

Several times a year, Jackson-Feild holds a voluntary Bible School for interested boys and girls. Led by Jackson-Feild’s chaplain The Rev. Dr. Robin Moore, an average of 39 residents and staff participated in the most recent daily Bible School activities.

With the theme “Sharing God,” a key component was for residents to witness and experience how everyone can be in service to others.  Each Bible School session includes a service project in which children do something for others in the community.  In this session, they made 48 pairs of “Silly Socks” for residents of Emporia Manor, a local assisted living facility. Starting with a pair of plain white socks, and an array of paint, the participants decorated the socks with their own unique designs.

Give a kid puffy paints, a pair of socks, and a little time, and something magical happens.  While some children worked individually, others worked in teams. The children’s creativity came alive through their designs, and the men and women of Emporia Manor will surely enjoy keeping their feet warm with a pair of happy “Silly Socks.”

Making Life A Little Sweeter For Area Kids Fighting Cancer with Anthem LemonAid: July 19-21

Anthem LemonAid Registration is Open!

 May 1, 2019, Richmond, VA, - Every week, another child is diagnosed with cancer in Central Virginia. Last year, Madison Martin was one of them. In September, she began treatment for germinoma, a rare form of cancer most commonly found in the brain, at Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU (CHoR).

Madison Martin, age 9. Treated for cancer at Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU.

Since then Madison’s journey has included three spinal taps, a brain biopsy, 40 overnight hospital stays, four rounds of chemotherapy and 20 radiation treatments. Throughout it all, the smile of this spunky 9-year-old continues to light up a room. Earlier this month, Madison and her family received the long-awaited news from doctors that she is “cancer free.” Now she has her sights set on "having a big cancer-free party," returning to the soccer and softball fields and of course, setting up an Anthem LemonAid stand this summer.

Sponsored by Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield, Anthem LemonAid is Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals’ signature summer event and has been helping kids with cancer since 2001. Participants distribute cups of lemonade in exchange for donations and 100% of funds raised benefit the Hematology and Oncology Clinic at CHoR. It’s free to participate in the event and supplies are provided. Every registered participant receives lemonade mix, cups, a pitcher, a banner, stickers and sunglasses. Stands can be set up at an available retail site or at a place of participants’ choosing. 

The event is great for families, businesses and community groups.

Along with Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield, other event sponsors include The Goddard School, Virginia Credit Union, RVA Primrose Schools, Call Federal Credit Union, Express Employment Professionals, Walmart, Kroger, Sweet Frog and Chick Fil-A. Great gratitude goes out to these partners who contribute to the success of Anthem LemonAid year after year.

To register for Anthem LemonAid or to learn more about the event, please visit www.AnthemLemonAid.com or call 804-228-5934.

Tags: 

Marie Doyle Bowen

November 4, 1930-April 29, 2019

Visitation Services

Saturday, May 4, 2019, 3 P.M. to 4 P.M.

Independence United Methodist Church
4438 Independence Church Rd
Emporia, VA 23847
 

Saturday, May 4, 2019, 4 P.M.

Independence United Methodist Church
4438 Independence Church Rd

Emporia, VA 23847

Mrs. Marie Doyle Bowen of Emporia VA, passed away on April 29, 2019 at the age of 88. Mrs. Bowen was born on November 4, 1930 in Greensville County, VA. She was a retired operator for Weldon Mills.

She is preceded in death by her mother and father, Mattie Pair and Younger Doyle, her husband, Johnny Pascal Bowen, brothers, Willie “Baw” Doyle, Elwood Doyle, Jerry Doyle, Jimmy Doyle, and sisters, Mabel Boykin and Elaine Gregory. She is survived by her son, Gary P. Bowen (Lynette) of Bonita Springs, FL, her daughter, Nancy B. Pernell of Emporia, VA, sister, Ann Anglin of Emporia, VA, grandchildren, John Pernell of Charlottesville, VA, and Mathew Pernell of Emporia VA, and several nieces and nephews, along with special friends and caregivers, Rachael Allen and Ella B. Powell.

A visitation will be held on Saturday, May 4, 2019, at Independence United Methodist Church from 3 P.M. to 4 P.M. A funeral service will follow the visitation starting at 4 P.M. with Rev. Jeaux Simmons officiating. Interment will be held at the church cemetery.

In lieu of flowers donations may be made to Independence United Methodist Church Cemetery Fund or Emporia-Greensville Vol. Rescue Squad.

 

 

Online condolences may be made to www.echolsfuneralhome.com

Graduate to deliver SVCC Address May 11

Stephen Franklin has accomplished much in his life and graduation speaker will be added to his resume on May 11, 2019 as he delivers the graduate address at Southside Virginia Community College in Keysville at 9:30 a.m. 

Franklin will graduate from SVCC as a nursing student along with more than 1,200 other eligible students from the Class of 2019.  A native of  Bossier City, Louisiana,  he is an Armed Forces Veteran with over a decade of experience in Navy Special Operations as a Search and Rescue Swimmer/Aircrewman.

He is a proud husband to wife, Celena, and father of two beautiful girls (Ava and Adelyn). He is a volunteer youth Soccer and Volleyball Coach in Halifax County and a member of the American Legion. He has an Associate’s Degree (RN) in Business Management and after completion of the SVCC Associate Degree Nursing Program plans to work in Emergency and Critical Care Medicine while continuing pursuit of advanced nursing education.

Jones Awarded Scholorship

Summer Dawn Jones senior at Greensville County High School and Southside Virginia Community College was selected to receive a scholarship in the amount of $1,000.00 from Mecklenburg Electric Cooperative.

She will be attending Virginia Commonwealth University in the fall to study nursing.

She is the daughter of Melissa and Paul Wozniak.

Could Hemp Join Tobacco as Big Cash Crop in Virginia?

Hate Crimes in Virginia Jump Almost by Half

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