Current Weather Conditions

 
Seven Day Forecast for Emporia, Virginia
 

Community Calendar Sponsored By...

 

Roslyn Tyler

Weather Delays and Closings

Schools

All area achools are reported closed on Monday, December 10

Government

City of Emporia - Closed Monday

Greensville/Emporia Courts - Closed Monday

Brunswick County - Closed Monday

State Prisons - Code Yellow Monday

If your destination is not listed here, please call ahead and ensure that they are open.

This list updated from WRIC, WWBT and WTVR at 22:36

 

Career Opportunity

Guidance Counselor

Brunswick Academy is seeking an experienced Guidance Counselor certified in Guidance beginning in the 2018-2019 school year. Brunswick Academy is a PreK-12 independent school located in Lawrenceville, VA.

Requirements: Possession of a Master’s Degree in School Counseling, Guidance Counseling, or School Guidance and Counseling from an accredited college or university; possession of or eligible for a Virginia Department of Education professional teaching certificate with a guidance endorsement and preferred 3 years experience in guidance or related field.

Job duties include but not limited to the following:

  • Provides academic, personal/social, and career counseling • Coordinates comprehensive school counseling program • Communicates with parents and agency representatives • Coordinates teacher and parent conferences as needed • Interprets test data and student records for parents and teachers •  Scheduling of classes • Engaged and on task • Performs other duties as required • Must have a thorough knowledge of the curriculum, instruction and counseling/guidance theory and practice • Communication skills, both oral and written, must be highly developed to meet the diverse needs of the clientele, professional staff and other community agencies • Must be able to organize and carry out student activity programs; or any equivalent combination of experience and training which would provide the required knowledge, skills, and abilities.

Health insurance and 403(b) retirement program available.

Brunswick Academy is an equal opportunity employer and a drug free work place.  Brunswick Academy does not discriminate on the basis of age, color, national origin, race, religion, or sex in employment or education.  Applicants considered for employment must successfully complete the following background investigations/tests: • State Police Criminal History Investigation • Child Protective Services (CPS) Investigation • Tuberculosis Screening/Test.  This position is open until filled.

Please e-mail cover letter and resume to:

Brunswick Academy
Attn:  Kristine Thompson
Guidance Counselor
E-mail:  thompsonk@brunswickacademy.com

Hunting the White Tail Deer and Chronic Wasting Disease

This year, I was one of the legislators to represent Virginia at the Southern Leadership Annual Conference in St. Louis, MI. I attended several workshops on education, economic development, public safety, and sportsmen rights. As a member of the Virginia Sportsmen Caucus and an advocate for hunting/ sportsman rights, I discussed the future of hunting as a sport with John Culclasure, who is the manager of the Congressional Sportsman Foundation at the National Sportsmen caucus meeting. One of the major hunting concerns nationwide that is impacting rural communities, is the spread of chronic wasting disease among the white tail deer population.

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) is a fatal neurological disease that affect deer, elks, and moose. This disease is transmitted to deer through saliva, feces, urine and through water or soil contaminated with an abnormal infectious protein called prion. The signs and symptoms of this disease (CWD) in deer are progressive weight loss, excessive thirst, teeth grinding, excessive salivation and holding the head in a lowered position and drooping ears.

Chronic Wasting Disease was first discovered in Virginia in 2009. The first case was found in November in 2017 in Frederick County.  The Department of Game and Inland Fisheries have tested 16 positive deer with chronic wasting disease during the months of October -November throughout Frederick, Warren, Shenandoah and Clarke County. Although chronic wasting disease poses a very serious threat to the deer population, the effects of the disease have shown to impose no substantial health risks to humans or domestic animals.

As we approach the deer hunting season, please be aware of this infectious disease that is gradually spreading among the white tail deer population. If you identify a deer exhibiting the above listed signs and symptoms, please contact the Game and Inland Fisheries or my office. Please feel free to invite me to your hunt club or church, or civic organization meeting by contacting my office at (434) 336-1710 or email delrtyler@house.virginia.gov.

Banker's Day on Capital Hill

Chris Everett, Will Clements, Delegate Roslyn Tyler, Dena Patrick and Eric Crawford meet at the General Assembly

The Bankers of Southside Virginia Bank visited  Delegate Roslyn Tyler of the 75 th District during Banker's  Day at the Virginia General Assembly. The Virginia Bankers Association has developed the following bills that will strengthen the banking industry.

Bills of importance are:

  • SB 860 Docketing of Judgement Satisfaction - The proposed legislation will allow will allow a designated successor that executes small estates affidavit to endorse checks and other  negotiable instruments made payable to the decedent's Estate.
  • SB 859 and HB 1800 Clarification of Payment Due Date - The Virginia Codes provides that no finance charge can be charged on a credit card debt that is paid in full prior to the next "billing date", Which must be at least 25 days later than the prior "billing date".  There has been confusion about what constitutes the "billing date." In order to clarify, this legislation will change "billing date to payment due date."

ARC Visits General Assembly

The Members of The ARC of Virginia and Partners were visiting the Virginia General Assembly advocating to protect individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities access to needed services and avoiding unnecessary institutionalization.  The members and families visited Delegate Roslyn Tyler regarding increased funding intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) waivers.  She is supportive of additional waivers and this concern is now being discussed in the budget bill (HB 30). If you support additional waivers in Virginia, please contact your legislator.

Susan Coon, Lia Tremblay, Joe Tremblay, (standing in back) Tommy Coon, Shannon Farthing, Delegate Roslyn Tyler, Anita Dommert, President of the Arc South of the James, and Becky Farthing.

STATE DECLINES DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS STUDY

By Eric Luther, Capital News Service

RICHMOND – A resolution allowing government agencies to examine employment conditions of penitentiaries statewide was tabled this week by the General Assembly’s Committee on Rules.  The resolution, proposed by Delegate Roslyn C. Tyler, D- Jarratt, would have directed the Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission to study employee health and safety concerns at the Virginia Department of Corrections. The resolution also would have inspected adequacy of staffing levels and turnover rates at correctional facilities across the Commonwealth.  Tyler says the committee acknowledged the study was needed.  However, JLARC is already three years behind in completing other studies.  “There are 30,000 inmates in prisons that (corrections officers) protect us from each day,” Tyler said. “They deserve the right to be kept safe and compensated as any other law enforcement officer.”

Don Baylor, an organizer for the National Coalition of Public Safety Officers’ Virginia chapter, spent nearly 30 years at the DOC before retiring in 2007. During his time with the department, Baylor worked as a corrections officer and watch commander at facilities throughout the state.  Baylor personally conveyed DOC health and safety concerns to Tyler. He says it is time to address the burden understaffing and budget cuts has placed on frontline correctional officers.  “There are a number of reasons why we need this study,” Baylor said. “The stress on these individuals who provide security and protection in these facilities is widespread and increasing.”

According to Baylor, studies by the U.S. Department of Justice, Criminal Justice Services and other organizations illustrate deteriorating health conditions among DOC personnel.  “We’re talking about a group of employees who are carrying one of the highest suicide rates, divorce rates and mortality rates of any other employees in this nation,” Baylor said. “Studies show that these folks are reaching stress levels of epidemic proportions.”

One such study was presented at the 2011 American Psychological Association’s Annual Convention by Desert Waters Correctional Outreach, a nonprofit organization seeking to improve health and safety of corrections staff through data-driven analysis.  The study sampled more than 3,500 corrections professionals’ from 49 states and three U.S. territories to assess the prevalence of depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and comorbid PTSD/depression among workers.

Desert Waters also explored the relationship between specific disorders and job type, according to official documents. Indices of health and well-being such as doctor visits, work absences and substance use also were measured.  Results show depression and PTSD rates among corrections personnel far exceed those of the general population. Overall, PTSD prevalence was estimated to be about 27 percent, according to the study. More than three times the rate of U.S. adults. 

Additionally, Desert Waters determined corrections officers’ risk of suicide is 39 percent higher than all other professions combined.  Baylor says residents and legislators alike need to be aware of the long-term physical and mental issues DOC working conditions can create.  “We need to take a look at these professionals and understand that if we get to a breaking point -- not only are correctional officers and the (incarcerated) people they are in charge of at risk,” Baylor said. “But the public at large.”

The results highlighted in Desert Waters’ study suggest the need for a comprehensive screening of employee health in corrections.

 According to official documents, system-wide interventions to address elevated levels of depression, PTSD and comorbidity also are necessary.  HJ31 stated all agencies of the commonwealth shall provide assistance to JLARC for this study, upon request. JLARC’s chairman then would submit a summary of its findings and recommendations no later than the first day of the 2015 General Assembly session.

Co-patron Delegate Vivian Watts, D-Annadale, and NCPSO President Richard Hatch did not respond to requests for comments.

Mecklenburg Electric Cooperative Directors Meet with Area Elected Officials in Richmond

Chase City, Va. – Several directors and key staff members of Mecklenburg Electric Cooperative (MEC) traveled to Richmond on January 27, to meet with state legislators at the Virginia General Assembly. They joined more than 200 directors and staff members from 12 other member-owned electric cooperatives across the Commonwealth who converged on the Capital for the Virginia, Maryland & Delaware Association of Electric Cooperative’s (VMDAEC) annual Legislative Day.

Attending from MEC were board members Stan Duffer, Bob Jones, Donnie Moore and John Waller as well as President & CEO John Lee, COO Glen Gillispie and Vice President of Member and Energy Services David Lipscomb. The office visits and reception afforded MEC directors and management an opportunity to meet one-on-one with legislators to talk about this year’s session and to discuss any legislation that might affect the Cooperative and its ability to provide its Membership with reliable, affordable and environmentally responsible electric power.

Cooperative representatives were briefed by VMDAEC staff members and political experts on the 2014 General Assembly before the group traveled to Capitol Square to call on Delegates and Senators representing the nine counties served by the cooperative. MEC representatives distributed a fact-filled handout to help educate newly elected legislators and the new administration about the “cooperative difference.” They also discussed issues pertinent to the Cooperative and invited the legislators and their staff members to the VMDAEC’s annual Legislative Reception planned for that evening.

 “This personal interaction is critical as MEC’s representatives work to develop strong working relationships with our local legislators and state officials,” states Lee, adding, “We must make every effort to educate them on the cooperative business model and ensure that these decision makers, who represent those we serve, are aware of the importance of electric cooperatives in providing energy to Virginia’s homeowners, farmers, businesses and industries. Ultimately, we are there to protect the best interests of our members and rural Virginia because there are few champions for those living in Southside Virginia these days and they are facing tremendous odds with regards to influencing legislation that impacts our rural way of life.”

AboutMecklenburg Electric Cooperative: Headquartered in Chase City with district offices in Emporia, Chase City and Gretna, Mecklenburg Electric Cooperative is a not-for-profit member-owned energy provider that serves more than 31,000 homes, farms and businesses throughout nine Central and Southside Virginia counties. For more information, go to www.meckelec.org.

In the photo: Mecklenburg Electric Cooperative (MEC) representatives meet with Delegate Roslyn Tyler in her office to discuss legislative issues that could have an impact on rural electrification.  More than 200 directors and staff members from 13 member-owned electric cooperatives converged on the Capital to call on delegates and senators for the Virginia, Maryland and Delaware Association of Electric Cooperative’s annual Legislative Day. Seated from left to right are MEC President & CEO John Lee, Jr., COO Glen Gillispie, and board member Donnie Moore.

Bill Aims to Prorate Waste Disposal Fees

By Jackson McMillan, Capital News Service

RICHMOND – A bill allowing Southampton County residents to pay monthly waste disposal fees as part of their electric bills is awaiting a hearing in the Counties, Cities and Towns Committee of the House of Delegates.

House Bill 62, introduced by Delegate Roslyn Tyler, D-Jarratt, would allow Southampton County to enter contractual agreements with light and power companies for the fee collection.  The bill would amend Section 15.2-2159 of the Code of Virginia to give Southampton County the same billing options that Accomack, Augusta, Floyd, Highland, Pittsylvania and Wise counties currently have.   “If the legislation is passed -- and if the county and the light and power companies may enter into contractual agreements -- consumers will pay (the waste disposal) fee in installments as opposed to a one-time annual fee,” Tyler stated in an email.

Only residents who dispose of their solid waste at a county landfill or solid waste collection site would be charged the fee.

Southampton County Board of Supervisors member S. Bruce Phillips, who represents the Capron District, said amending the code is not a hard push to impose any legislation on Southampton’s residents.  “This bill (HB62) is asking the General Assembly for authorization to give Southampton County the ability to enter agreements (with the power companies),” Phillips said. “It allows the board of supervisors to ask the people if they prefer monthly fees to an annual fee.”

If the measure were passed, a monthly waste disposal fee of $16.67 would be added to Southampton County residents’ electric bill in lieu of an annual waste fee of $200.

“The legislation does not obligate or require any light or power company to collect the fee,” Tyler stated. “It only provides that they may.”

Subscribe to RSS - Roslyn Tyler

Emporia News

Stories on Emporianews.com are be searchable, using the box above. All new stories will be tagged with the date (format YYYY-M-D or 2013-1-1) and the names of persons, places, institutions, etc. mentioned in the article. This database feature will make it easier for those people wishing to find and re-read an article.  For anyone wishing to view previous day's pages, you may click on the "Previous Day's Pages" link in the menu at the top of the page, or search by date (YYYY-M-D format) using the box above.

Comment Policy:  When an article or poll is open for comments feel free to leave one.  Please remember to be respectful when you comment (no foul or hateful language, no racial slurs, etc) and keep our comments safe for work and children. .Comments are moderated and comments that contain explicit or hateful words will be deleted.  IP addresses are tracked for comments. 

EmporiaNews.com serves Emporia and Greensville County, Virginia and the surrounding area
and is provided as a community service by the Advertisers and Sponsors.
All material on EmporiaNews.com is copyright 2005-2018
EmporiaNews.com is powered by Drupal and based on the ThemeBrain Sirate Theme.

Submit Your Story!

Emporia News welcomes your submissions!  You may submit articles, announcements, school or sports information using the submission forms found here, or via e-mail on news@emporianews.com.  Currently, photos and advertisements will still be accepted only via e-mail, but if you have photos to go along with your submission, you will receive instructions via e-mail. If you have events to be listed on the Community Calendar, submit them here.

Contact us at news@emporianews.com
 
EmporiaNews.com is hosted as a community Service by Telpage.  Visit their website at www.telpage.net or call (434)634-5100 (NOTICE: Telpage cannot help you with questions about Emporia New nor does Teplage have any input the content of Emporia News.  Please use the e-mail address above if you have any questions, comments or concerns about the content on Emporia News.)