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Career Opportunity

Residential Counselors

(Youth Service Workers)

 

Job#: 2017-10

If you are interested in making a positive impact on the lives of Virginia’s youth, then we want you to become part of our Team!  Rural Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facility located in Jarratt, Virginia seeks positive role models to work directly with adolescent boys and girls in a psychiatric residential treatment program.  The Youth Service Worker is responsible for role-modeling healthy behavior, teaching life skills, administering a trauma informed behavioral support program, and leading youth in and participating in social, cultural, and recreational activities.  This position supervises youth in the residential unit and on off-campus activities and appointments.

Must possess the availability to work weekends, evenings, holidays, and nights.  Supreme flexibility required. 

Seeking candidates with Bachelor’s Degrees in Psychology, Sociology or other Human Services field.   Experience will be considered in lieu of a degree.

Compensation package includes 401(k) retirement plan & employer sponsored health, dental, vision & life insurance.  JBHS is a Drug Free Workplace.  Successful applicants must pass a pre-employment drug screen and criminal background screening.  EOE.  Positions opened until filled.

E-mail cover letter and resume to:

Jackson-Feild Behavioral Health Services
Attn: Chris Thompson
Job # 2017-10
E-mail:careers@jacksonfeild.org

Celebrated Valley Proteins Fellowships Awarded

RICHMOND – The Virginia Foundation for Community College Education is proud to introduce its seventh class of Valley Proteins Fellows.

This year’s scholarship recipients are:

Tewodros “Teddy” Maxson, Central Virginia
Marie Shiraki, Dabney S. Lancaster
Lydia Hodges, Patrick Henry
Samantha Scott, Piedmont Virginia
Mostafa Mohibzadh, Thomas Nelson
Donald Cooper, J. Sargeant Reynolds
Hope Geiger, Southwest Virginia
Madison Goodie, Southwest Virginia
Austin Bryant, Virginia Western
Daniel Feher, Wytheville

Out of the more than 242,000 people Virginia’s Community Colleges serve across the commonwealth each year, only 10 second-year students are selected for the Valley Proteins Fellows Program. The scholarship, combined with professional development, travel, and cultural opportunities has an approximate value of $15,000.

In addition to receiving full tuition, book expenses and fees, the Fellows participate in a unique curriculum of intellectual and cultural activities. The Fellows also volunteer 80 hours of community service during the academic year to strengthen their leadership skills and develop a strong foundation for future success.

The fellows program is made possible thanks to the generous support of Valley Proteins, Inc. The Winchester-based company has been in the rendering business for 68 years and currently operates 15 plants in eight states.

“Valley Proteins is privileged to invest in the future of some of Virginia's most outstanding students,” said Gerald F. (J.J.) Smith, Jr., president of Valley Proteins, Inc. “Helping to remove some of the obstacles that can hinder their success is a priority for us, and it reflects our commitment and support for the community college mission overall.”

The Virginia Foundation for Community College Education, the fundraising arm of Virginia’s Community Colleges, oversees the fellows program, which Valley Proteins has funded for seven consecutive years.

New State Board Chair Focused on Increasing Community College Enrollments

RICHMOND – Eleanor Saslaw begins her yearlong term as the chair of the Virginia State Board for Community College this month, and she is focusing on increasing community college enrollment.

Serving on the board for the last three years – including one year as the Board’s vice chair – represents only a fraction of the experience Saslaw brings to the post. After all, the two-time college graduate has spent her entire career working in education. Her experience ranges from being a teacher, counselor and director of student services in Fairfax County Public Schools, to serving as the president of the Virginia Counselors Association, to serving as a member of and the president of the Virginia Board of Education.

Saslaw says educating an individual may just be the most important thing you can do for them and the community they live in.

“If you don’t educate people, you end up supporting them,” she said. “We want to see Virginians succeeding in the 21st century; that includes new Virginians. More education means a higher standard of living. It means our businesses thrive, and it means our tax base is strong. Our community colleges do a terrific job of helping people get there.”

Saslaw is placing a priority for the coming year on helping Virginia’s Community College serve more people. The colleges are seeking ways to reverse several years of enrollment declines. Saslaw wants the Board to ensure the colleges have the tools and knowledge to turn that around.

“Chancellor DuBois and I have been talking about that and he shares my concerns,” Saslaw said. “We’ve had good luck in the past using the task force model to address big, statewide challenges. It may be time to do that here.”

Saslaw was born in San Francisco and moved to the East Coast when she was eleven. She and her husband, state Senator Dick Saslaw (D-Fairfax County) moved to Virginia after getting married. They have a daughter who works as a lawyer in San Francisco.

“I feel like I gave something back with that one,” Saslaw said.

Saslaw has won numerous awards including the Friend of School Psychologists Award (2011) and Counselor of the Year (1998 and 1994). She has a master’s degree in secondary counseling and a bachelor’s degree in social studies education.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 252,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

New State Board Chair Focused on Increasing Community College Enrollments

RICHMOND – Eleanor Saslaw begins her yearlong term as the chair of the Virginia State Board for Community College this month, and she is focusing on increasing community college enrollment.

Serving on the board for the last three years – including one year as the Board’s vice chair – represents only a fraction of the experience Saslaw brings to the post. After all, the two-time college graduate has spent her entire career working in education. Her experience ranges from being a teacher, counselor and director of student services in Fairfax County Public Schools, to serving as the president of the Virginia Counselors Association, to serving as a member of and the president of the Virginia Board of Education.

Saslaw says educating an individual may just be the most important thing you can do for them and the community they live in.

“If you don’t educate people, you end up supporting them,” she said. “We want to see Virginians succeeding in the 21st century; that includes new Virginians. More education means a higher standard of living. It means our businesses thrive, and it means our tax base is strong. Our community colleges do a terrific job of helping people get there.”

Saslaw is placing a priority for the coming year on helping Virginia’s Community College serve more people. The colleges are seeking ways to reverse several years of enrollment declines. Saslaw wants the Board to ensure the colleges have the tools and knowledge to turn that around.

“Chancellor DuBois and I have been talking about that and he shares my concerns,” Saslaw said. “We’ve had good luck in the past using the task force model to address big, statewide challenges. It may be time to do that here.”

Saslaw was born in San Francisco and moved to the East Coast when she was eleven. She and her husband, state Senator Dick Saslaw (D-Fairfax County) moved to Virginia after getting married. They have a daughter who works as a lawyer in San Francisco.

“I feel like I gave something back with that one,” Saslaw said.

Saslaw has won numerous awards including the Friend of School Psychologists Award (2011) and Counselor of the Year (1998 and 1994). She has a master’s degree in secondary counseling and a bachelor’s degree in social studies education.
 

State Board Sets Tuition for 2017-2018 Academic Year

RICHMOND —The State Board for Community Colleges, by a unanimous vote, established the 2017-2018 academic year in-state tuition and mandatory fees rate at $150.25 per credit hour today at its regular May meeting. Beginning this fall, in-state students will pay an additional $4.00 per credit hour – an increase of 2.7 percent – which means the cost of a typical three-hour class will increase by $12 and the cost of a full-time load of classes for the year will increase by $120.

The new rate keeps community college tuition and mandatory fees at approximately one-third of the comparable costs at Virginia’s public four-year universities.

Virginia’s Community Colleges will use the tuition increase to pay a share of the General Assembly-approved employee pay raise; rising fringe benefit costs; and costs associated with using various Virginia administrative systems. It will also pay for operating costs for new buildings.

“Our State Board remains sensitive to the need to ensure higher education is affordable for Virginia families,” said James Cuthbertson, chair of the Virginia State Board for Community Colleges. “Accordingly, today’s tuition decision strikes a careful balance between that need and our commitment to provide an outstanding and worthy educational experience.”

TUITION DIFFERENTIALS

The State Board also agreed to approve select increases in the tuition differential rates that are in addition to the base tuition. The board approved increasing the differential for Northern Virginia Community College by $1.00 per credit hour. Even with the differential, NVCC’s tuition remains the lowest among comparable colleges in the Washington, D.C. metro area.

Further, the board approved an increase of 50 cents per credit hour to the tuition differential rate for John Tyler Community College in Chesterfield and the Tri-city area.

The tuition differential rates remain unchanged from last year for the following community colleges: Germanna in Fredericksburg; Piedmont Virginia in Charlottesville; Reynolds in Richmond; Tidewater in Hampton Roads; Thomas Nelson on the Virginia Peninsula; and Virginia Western in Roanoke.

OUT-OF-STATE TUITION

The State Board increased the tuition rate for out-of-state students by $4.00 per credit hour to a total of $346.85 per credit hour. As required by law, the Board also approved an increase of $1.00 per credit hour to support the debt service for Virginia’s Higher Education Equipment Trust Fund. Out-of-state students make up approximately five percent of the total enrollment of Virginia’s Community Colleges.

OUT-OF-STATE ACTIVE DUTY MILITARY DISCOUNT

The Board elected to take advantage of a change in state law that allows public institutions to charge reduced tuition and mandatory fees to active duty military members stationed outside Virginia who are enrolled in degree programs associated with their Military Occupational Specialty (MOS).
The Out-of-State Active Duty Military Discount essentially allows the VCCS to charge active service members a reduced tuition rate along with the $1.00 per credit hour capital fee required of all out-of-state students. The discount will save military members more than half of what they would otherwise pay in out-of-state tuition.

Walmart Partners with Local Community Colleges on Workforce Credentials

RICHMOND – The Virginia Foundation for Community College Education (VFCCE) has partnered with one of the nation’s largest retailers to respond to a growing need in the local labor market.

Thanks to a generous $80,000 grant from Walmart, the VFCCE is pledging to help hundreds of Richmond-area community college students pay for their certification exams.

The students targeted for assistance through the Workforce Credential Award initiative have completed their studies in a high-demand field like manufacturing, IT, or healthcare but may not be able to afford the cost of the certification exam (average cost of $200). The lack of certification delays their entry into the workforce.

The target population for the initiative are students at J. Sargeant Reynolds and John Tyler Community Colleges who have completed an industry-recognized and approved credit workforce training program but lack the financial resources to pay for the required certification exam.

Awards will be made on a first-come, first-served basis. The grant is expected to fund certification exams for an estimated 360 students. It is projected that 90% of the students who participate in the program will pass the exam and immediately enter the workforce in the Greater Richmond area.

Dr. Sharon Morrissey, vice chancellor for academic services & research, Dr. Gary Rhodes, president, J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College, Glenn DuBois, chancellor, Peter Johnson, Walmart market manager (north Richmond), Dennis Dickson, Walmart market manager (south Richmond), Robert Davis, Walmart regional general manager, Dr. Ted Raspiller, president, John Tyler Community College.

Virginia State Board for Community Colleges March 2017 Business Meeting to be Held at Reynolds Community College

RICHMOND – The State Board for Community Colleges will convene its regular meeting on Thursday, March 16, 2017 at 9:00 a.m. in the Conference Center Gallery on the campus of J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College at 1651 E. Parham Rd., Richmond, VA 23228.

State Board Committees will meet on Wednesday, March 15, also in the Conference Center Gallery. The Academic, Student Affairs and Workforce Development Committee and the Budget and Finance Committee meet at 1:30 p.m. (Salons 3 and 2 respectively); the Facilities Committee and the Personnel Committee meet at 3 p.m. (Salon 2 and the Executive Board Room respectively); and the Audit Committee meets at 3:45 p.m. in Salon 3. An Executive Committee meeting will take place at the conclusion of all other committee meetings in the Executive Board Room.

Public comment will be received at each regular meeting of the board following the approval of minutes. Persons desiring to comment must notify the Chancellor’s Office in advance as specified by the VCCS Policy Manual.

A complete agenda for the State Board meeting is available at: http://www.boarddocs.com/va/vccs/Board.nsf/Public.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve more than 252,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu.

Dominion Invests in Virginia’s Community Colleges to Train Workers for Emerging Solar/Renewables Industries

~Funds support solar/renewable workforce development at seven community colleges~

Richmond, Va. – Virginia’s Community Colleges are creating and expanding training programs for those seeking careers in renewable energy, thanks in part to a grant of $150,000 from the Dominion Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Dominion Virginia Power.

The grant to the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education, or VFCCE, is helping seven community colleges fund new energy labs and equipment, allowing them to offer solar panel technician training and other renewable energy courses. The community colleges benefitting from the initiative are John Tyler, Northern Virginia, Tidewater, Virginia Highlands, Mountain Empire, Southside Virginia and Central Virginia. 

Virginia aspires to be a leader in solar produced power, but needs to bolster its solar workforce to leverage significant investments being made in the sector. Installing and maintaining solar panels for solar farms, residential communities, commercial developments and other structures will require more skilled workers. 

“Virginia can’t afford to miss out on a growing industry like solar energy because our workforce lacks the training and skills to seize the opportunity,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “We are delighted to work with Dominion to prepare the next generation of solar workers – another big example of our efforts to meet the needs of Virginia’s business community to help grow the Commonwealth’s economy.” 

Virginia currently ranks 30th in the nation for solar energy production, but many companies, including Dominion Virginia Power, are forging ahead to add solar energy to the grid. Dominion is committed to developing 400 megawatts of renewable energy by 2020. It currently has 398 megawatts of large-scale solar facilities (enough to power 95,000 homes) under development or in operation in 12 Virginia localities. In January, the company completed three large-scale solar farms that employed 550 workers during construction. 

“Virginia’s community colleges are uniquely positioned to provide the training for skilled workers in renewable energy fields,” said Hunter A. Applewhite, president of the Dominion Foundation. “We are excited to support these initiatives that will help boost job growth in Virginia.”

This workforce development project started in 2016. It will grow in 2017 to expand the curriculum to all community colleges that offer energy programs. The curriculum will also support expansion of energy programs at high schools through dual enrollment and usage of mobile solar labs.

Foundation Grant Will Enable Paul D. Camp Community College to Respond to Growing Demand for Solar Jobs

RICHMOND — The Virginia Foundation for Community College Education is presenting Paul D. Camp Community College with the 8th Annual Valley Proteins Award for Workforce Development. The $10,000 grant is funded by Valley Proteins, and it will help the college create a Career Studies Certificate (CSC) program in energy technology with a focus on solar energy.

With four large solar farms in various stages of review, approval, and construction within the PDCCC service region, college officials were eager to get the program up and running to accommodate the nearly 500 specially-trained jobs the facilities will require. Paul D. Camp has campuses in both Franklin and Suffolk. 

“This CSC in energy technology will provide both the entry-level and mid-level solar energy training to support the construction, operation, and maintenance of the burgeoning solar industry currently underway in the rural Hampton Roads area,” said VCCS Chancellor Glenn DuBois.

The Valley Proteins Endowment Fund is awarded annually to support workforce development programs at Virginia’s Community Colleges in the areas of environmental science, commercial truck driving, heating and air conditioning, and office technology.

"We are very grateful to have received this Valley Proteins grant. The goal of our program is to provide the community and industry with the best-trained students possible. This generous grant will provide our students job opportunities in the growing field of solar energy in PDCCC’s service region,” observed PDCCC President Dan Lufkin.

The process of earning a certificate in energy technology can be completed in one academic year. PDCCC expects to begin offering the Energy Technology Career Studies Certificate program in the fall of 2017. It is anticipated that the success of the first class of graduates will attract even more students to the program.

This is the second time Paul D. Camp Community College has earned the award. Previous recipients of the annual award include Blue Ridge Community College, Eastern Shore Community College, John Tyler Community College, and Southside Virginia Community College.

Headquartered in Winchester, Valley Proteins, Inc. is committed to supporting the workforce, particularly in the areas in which it has a business presence. The 66-year-old firm operates plants in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas. Its processing facilities recycle food waste materials into usable products and bio fuels for feed and industrial applications.

Virginia’s Community Colleges and the Virginia Space Grant Consortium Breathe New Life into STEM Takes Flight Initiative

RICHMOND — Students pursuing studies in science, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM) fields statewide will continue to have access to some of the best and brightest minds at NASA, thanks to an agreement between Virginia’s Community Colleges and the Virginia Space Grant Consortium (VSGC).

The extended STEM Takes Flight at Virginia’s Community Colleges NASA Research Experience Program will provide a total of 23 students per year for 2017 and 2018, potentially one from each college, with a rigorous research experience at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton or NASA Wallops Flight Facility on Virginia’s Eastern Shore.

Dr. Van Wilson, assistant vice chancellor for academic and student services for Virginia’s Community Colleges, describes the program as competitive and hands-on.

“NASA provides some of the best and brightest of their scientists to work side-by-side with these students. In addition to the technological component, the students also learn the importance of so-called soft skills like teamwork and communication.”

While NASA officials will ultimately determine which students are selected, Wilson says Virginia’s Community Colleges’ responsibility will be to solicit applications from talented and qualified students who are aligned with NASA’s mission and objectives.

Wilson adds that participating students will be involved in the same kind of problem-solving challenges NASA engineers face every day.

“Some of the things that these students are doing, it really is rocket science. It is a level of engagement in STEM that other students just don’t have the opportunity to do.”

TheSTEM Takes Flight at Virginia’s Community Colleges NASA Research Experience Program is designed to foster community college retention in STEM academic tracks through graduation with an associate degree or transfer to a four-year institution. It also embraces the VCCS goals of increasing access to affordable education and training in preparation for workforce success. The program is made possible by joint funding from the VCCS and the VSGC.

STEM Takes Flight at Virginia’s Community Colleges NASA Research Experience Program partners include: the Virginia Community College System (VCCS), the Virginia Space Grant Consortium, the Virginia Community College System (VCCS), NASA Langley Research Center and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center’s Wallops Flight Facility.

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium is part of NASA’s Space Grant College and Fellowship Program. VSGC affiliate members include: Virginia Community College System; College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia, Virginia Tech, NASA Langley Research Center, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center’s Wallops Flight Facility, Science Museum of Virginia, State Council of Higher Education for Virginia, Virginia Department of Education, MathScience Innovation Center, Virginia Air and Space Center, and Virginia’s Center for Innovative Technology.

50th Anniversary Graduating Class Breaks Records for Virginia’s Community Colleges

RICHMOND — Virginia’s Community Colleges are off to a promising start in their quest to triple the number of credentials students earn annually by the year 2021. As the VCCS celebrates its 50th anniversary, the 2016 class was the most successful in history, reaching record numbers for both individual graduates and credentials earned. This past spring’s graduations also represented the end of the first year of the VCCS’s six-year statewide strategic plan, Complete 2021, which established the goal of tripling credentials.

All told, Virginia’s Community Colleges saw a 7.6% increase in degrees, certificates and diplomas earned, from 31,194 to 33,580 – and a 5.2% increase in the number of individual graduates, from 25,562 to 26,899. There were significant increases in certain groups driving those record numbers including:

  • A 14% increase in the number of Hispanic/Latino graduates;
  • An 11.4% increase in the number of so-called traditional-age graduates, those between the ages of 18 and 24; and
  • A 9% increase in the number of graduates who are the first in their family to attend and graduate college – in fact, first generation students earned one out of every five awards earned by the 2016 class.

There was also a smaller, though notable, increase of 6.5% in the number of men graduating. Traditionally, men pursue and complete postsecondary credentials at rates well below that of women. Today, men make up just more than 41% of the total VCCS enrollment.

The graduation numbers above do not include the more than 13,000 industry-certified credentials earned by VCCS students in short-term workforce training programs last year. Those programs operate outside of a traditional academic calendar and are counted separately.

“With a focus on student success, we are helping more individuals overcome the barriers that can prevent them from earning a postsecondary credential, the passport that is essential today to pursuing the American Dream,” said Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s Community Colleges. “Much work remains, however, if we are going to reach that tripling goal of Complete 2021 and truly prepare individuals for the new Virginia economy.”

No one, perhaps, better personifies that pursuit of the American Dream better than Augusto “Gus” Infantas, 22, who became the first in his family to attend and graduate college when he earned his degree last May from Northern Virginia Community College.

Infantas was born in Peru but raised in America. The sometimes-frustrating process of obtaining legal residency, and a lack of resources, delayed his pursuit of a college education. Instead, he began working fulltime to support his family. He wasn’t sure what to think by the time he made it to campus.

“As a very non-traditional student, I was nervous going into college; I was older and working two jobs all through school. But the diversity of people, thoughts and ideas made me comfortable. I was encouraged by faculty and other students to succeed. They motivated me to reach toward my goals,” said Infantas.

Infantas is now studying finance at the University of Virginia. “NVCC really sets students up for success,” he added. “You just have to be willing to work for it.”

Healthcare Leader Takes the Reins as New Board Chair

RICHMOND – With more than 35 years of experience in the healthcare industry, James Cuthbertson is accustomed to making critical decisions that impact entire organizations.

As the former president and chief executive officer of the Texas Heart Institute – the world’s largest cardiovascular treatment center- he is an acknowledged authority on complex medical organizations, their governance, and the strategies that have allowed them to achieve their prominence. These attributes make him ideally suited to assume his new role, that of chairman of the State Board for Community Colleges.

Cuthbertson feels the biggest challenge now facing Virginia’s Community Colleges is demonstrating to prospective students and their families that a community college education represents a solid return on their investment.

“Through our system of community colleges, we can help students build foundations upon which they need to launch and sustain successful careers in a world that is quickly and constantly changing,” Cuthbertson said.

Cuthbertson says the explosive demand for a credentialed workforce is the most pressing need in higher education today.

“Our assets position us to provide individuals with the training they need to earn the workforce credentials that matter most to businesses in every corner of the commonwealth,” he observed. “Our colleges are not only geographically distributed in such a way as to permit easy access to all Virginians, but they remain constantly engaged with their business communities to ensure that the workforce credential training programs we offer are tuned to the current demands of the regional economies our colleges serve.”

Cuthbertson describes his leadership style as one of participative guidance and inclusion. He adds that he’s honored to have been selected as board chair.

“I am encouraged by the challenges that we as a board face and confident that we will succeed in supporting the mission of our system and the strategic goals, including Complete 2021, that Chancellor DuBois has established.”

Also taking on a new role on the board is Eleanor Saslaw. She becomes the board’s vice chair, the title previously held by Cuthbertson.

A licensed professional counselor, Saslaw began her career as a teacher in the Fairfax County school system. She has won numerous awards including the Friend of School Psychologists Award (2011) and Counselor of the Year (1998 and 1994).

Saslaw was appointed to the State Board for Community Colleges in 2014 by Gov. Terry McAuliffe and currently serves as liaison to both Rappahannock and Patrick Henry Community Colleges.

About Virginia’s Community Colleges: Since 1966, Virginia’s Community Colleges have given everyone the opportunity to learn and develop the right skills so lives and communities are strengthened. By making higher education and workforce training available in every part of Virginia, we elevate all of Virginia. Together, Virginia’s Community Colleges serve approximately 400,000 students each year. For more information, please visit www.vccs.edu. To share a story about how community colleges change lives, visit 50.vccs.edu.

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